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Phil McDade

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Ozaukee Country Club

The logo of the Ozaukee Country Club, one of the most distinctive in Wisconsin, comes from this bronze sculpture near the front entrance of the clubhouse.

Golf architect William Langford and his construction partner Theodore Moreau are credited with four course designs in Wisconsin – the well-known Lawsonia Links outside Green Lake, Spring Valley near the Illinois border, West Bend’s front nine, and Ozaukee Country Club in the northern Milwaukee suburb of Mequon.

Of the four, Ozaukee is perhaps the most incongruous. Its routing – save for one interesting variation – remains exactly as Langford drew it up in 1921. Like Lawsonia, Langford made very good use of the rolling terrain at Ozaukee to create some holes with blindness and uncertainty. The greens themselves have some wonderful contouring – not (with one notable exception again) the exaggerated contouring you find at Lawsonia or West Bend, but of a more subtle kind (similar in some respects to the green surfaces at Spring Valley.) It takes its design heritage seriously, and descendants of Moreau are members of the club.

Yet Langford drew up designs for the course that would have included some of the boldest bunkering of any Langford course still in existence; sadly, the original plans were never fully realized. Langford/Moreau fans looking for the pair’s trademark mounding and clean lines, evident throughout their work at Lawsonia, won’t find much of it here, and will likely be disappointed in the mish-mash of bunkering styles at Ozaukee. The course, originally built on a largely treeless plain similar to his work at Lawsonia and West Bend, now sports a traditional parkland look, with trees defining all hole corridors. Nearly every hole on the course would be better served by selective – occasionally wholesale – tree removal.

Still, Ozaukee – built nine years before the duo’s seminal work at Lawsonia -- remains a course worthy of study in the Langford/Moreau portfolio. I first played it a few years ago, as part of a GCA-organized tour of the pair’s Wisconsin courses, and had a chance to revisit it recently when the club hosted local qualifying for the U.S. Open. I came away more impressed with the course than when I played it, and in particular was quite impressed on a return visit with its outstanding greens, and solid routing. Fully half the greens on the course are first-rate – the equal, or nearly so, of some of the best at Lawsonia.

Course details: The course from the tips plays to 6,718 yards (although some new tees push that a bit beyond the yardage listed on the card) with a par of 70 (72.7 rating/129 slope).  The course also features white (6,358 yds), gold (5,806 yds) and forward (5,460 yds) tees. In keeping with Langford’s 18-hole Wisconsin courses, Ozaukee features five par 3s (and three par 5s). Yardages listed for each hole are from the tips and white tees.

1st hole (par 4, 438/412)
The course starts off with a downhill-ish par 4 over rolling terrain – OB lines the far right side of the entire hole, while thick woods lie close to the left edge of the fairway. A tough opener – it played as the second-hardest hole on the course during the U.S. Open qualifying round.


The greens at Ozaukee are large, mostly tipped from back to front, with bunkers dug into the sides.


2nd hole (par 5, 505/491)
A gentle dogleg to the left, this par 5 can be reached in two for many golfers; the target is a ridge line in the distance. Anything short of the ridge line will leave a blind approach.


The second-shot approach to the 2nd is downhill; the green – wide but shallow -- is heavily bunkered.


3rd hole (par 4, 392/376)
A gentle dog-leg left, this par 4 features containment mounds on the right side – a jarring look on a Langford/Moreau course. They are not part of the original course construction.


These sharp-edged, flashed-up bunkers bear a striking resemblance to the bunkering at Ozaukee’s better-known neighbor a few miles to the south -- Milwaukee Country Club.


Milwaukee Country Club (Alison) bunkers, par 4 11th hole.


4th hole (par 3, 173/155)
A solid uphill par 3; getting rid of the pine trees that frame the backside of the hole would add to the uncertainty of the tee shot.


Although the green location follows the natural uphill flow of the land, you can tell the hand of Langford and Moreau is evident in this severely built-up green; the fall off on the right-back portion of the green is at least 10 feet.


5th hole (par 5, 548/535)
Looking back toward the tee of this par 5, Langford routed this hole over some beautiful rolling land.


The fairway ends about 100 yards short of the green, with the land diving into a small valley where the heavily trapped green can be found.


6th hole (par 3, 209/184)
For my tastes, Ozaukee really starts to take off here – a downhill par 3 which begins a run of several outstanding greens.  Even from nearly 200 yards away, the observant golfer notices the sharp back-to-front tilt of the green.


A closer look at the green, and the high lip of the fronting bunker that adds to the intimidation factor on the tee.


This unlucky golfer (left, in the blue polo and white hat) found himself in the unfortunate position of being at the very rear edge of the green with a flag placed in the front third of the green. Photos do little justice to just how sharply tilted this green is.


7th hole (par 4, 416/391)
A dogleg to the left whose primary virtue is its outstanding green – not exactly a punchbowl, but a green with high spots on the left and right sides, another one rear-left, a false front (troublesome for a green that sits above the fairway), and lots of subtle contours. Here’s a look at it.


8th hole (par 4, 442/425)
A terrific hole, maybe the best that Ozaukee has to offer, and the toughest for those at the recent U.S. Open qualifying round, playing nearly a full stroke above par. From a slightly elevated tee, the player must cross a creek to reach a fairway that swings right and uphill. From the tips, the carry across the creek is nearly 200 yards.


The gentle folds of the land don’t necessarily assure the player of a level lie for his second shot. The green of the 8th – one of the best in the entire Langford/Moreau canon? – looms to the right (you can see it amongst the trees).


The green is sited among some of the largest trees at Ozaukee – one of only two groves of hardwood trees on the land when the course was built. The green – 40 yards deep – has three distinct tiers. With a back pin, and a long, uphill second for his approach, the golfer may have to take two additional clubs for his shot into this green.


The green is so large, it’s hard to capture adequately in photos. But note in this photo the two players left, who are walking off the lowest portion of the green, and contrast that to the rear of the green where the pin is located. It’s a substantial tilt. A terrific hole that features not a single bunker, and really doesn’t need one.


9th hole (par 3, 158/140 – a new tee pushes the yardage to 188 yds)
The front nine ends with this uphill par 3, with an enormous bunker menacing the front entrance.


Looking back on the hole from behind the green. The triangular-shaped green offers many pin positions; this one is particularly devilish, as putts past the hole risk zooming off the right side into the fringe.


(Back nine to follow)

Phil McDade

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2010, 12:13:55 PM »

Ozaukee CC cont'd...

10th hole (par 4, 435/424)
The fairway on this dogleg left sweeps past bunkers to leave this downhill approach, with a large bunker and pond looming right. The large green here is another good one, with considerable contouring providing for many pin positions.


11th hole (par 4, 411/392)
The 11th runs in the opposite direction of the 10th, and allowed Langford to use his trademark fondness for blind shots. I’ve always thought Langford designed terrific uphill holes, because he wasn’t afraid to leave the golfer with some uncertainty about the outcome of his shot. The play is to the ridge line in the distance; past it lies a broad plain of fairway.


The short player who leaves his tee shot on the upper tier of the fairway will be left with a long approach into the green, which is offset slightly from the fairway to the left.


The longer player may find his tee shot in this depression in the fairway, leaving a totally blind shot into the green. The aiming point is just to the right of Old Glory, not straight ahead.


The green at the 11th – another large target full of contouring.


12th hole (par 4, 446/429)
This par 4 sweeps dramatically to the left around a large and long fairway bunker; the approach will likely be off a downhill lie.


The 12th features one of the truly fun greens on the course – it’s one of the smallest, but full of bold contouring.


From not far behind where I took this picture, a player at the qualifying tournament punched a low runner out of the woods. It hit well before the green, turned left, took a look at the pin, ran up the back bank, turned back toward the pin, then was carried off to the left fringe by a subtle slope in the green. The shot may have taken nearly 10 seconds to unfold; witnessing it, I immediately thought of GCA contributor John Kirk’s theory about the joys of watching shots slowly unfold.


Another look at the high right side of the green, and the broad fairway of the 12th. Despite being overly treed, Ozaukee seems for the most part to have done a good job of maintaining the traditionally wide fairway corridors that Langford designed.


13th hole (par 4, 449/425)

Another bunkerless hole, the 13th offers a dramatic speed slot for the golfer willing (or able) to play a draw off a sharply contoured fairway.


A closer look at the speed slot right; the golfer executing the shot correctly can add another 50 yards to their drive.


Another terrific (and not that big) green; note in the second photo the trademark built-up green that often defines the look of a Langford/Moreau course.



14th hole (par 3, 171/154 – a new tee pushes the yardage back to 207 yds)
An uphill par 3 that recently added a new back tree, stretching it out to more than 200 yards (and creating an even longer walkback from the 13th green).


Two looks at the wonderful contouring of the 14th green. Although the par 3s at Ozaukee are all solid, and feature terrific contouring on the greens, their overall design leaves them a bit less impressive, in my estimation, than Langford and Moreau’s par 3s at Lawsonia or even Spring Valley.



15th hole (par 5, 497/475)
One of the few places at Ozaukee where Langford demands the golfer play a precisely fitted tee shot; the hole requires a shot toward a ridge line slotted between two fairway bunkers. Easily the narrowest fairway target on the course.  (The pinching bunkers are part of Langford’s original design scheme for this hole).


The player failing to find the fairway has to decide whether he wants to take on the creek with his second shot. The creek cuts through the fairway at an angle from left to right.


The star of the 15h hole is its green, and notably this elephant buried underneath the right side. At the Langford course tour a few years ago, GCA poster Evan Fleischer – just off the green, and stymied behind the hump with a pin set just beyond it – played a beautiful little running chip up and over to within tap-in distance.


Two more looks at this green and its wonderful feature; pins set to the left and front on this green seem like pins set in the front half of a Biarritz green – what fun is that?



16th hole (par 3, 188/150)
A one-shotter over a small pond that shows off some of the work of Ron Forse, who has done consulting work for Ozaukee. Forse, known for his faithful treatment of Langford courses, dug these bunkers deeper into the sides of the green here, extended the left bunker toward the back of the green, and worked to keep the sand largely level with the land, rather than “flashed-up” – much more in keeping with the trademark Langford/Moreau bunker look.


17th hole (par 4, 404/382)
This par four over flat terrain gently doglegs to the left, and is distinguished by a green with a substantial spine running at a diagonal through its middle.


18th hole (par 4, 436/418)
A rousing closer; the tee shot is uphill to one of the widest fairways at Ozaukee.


The rollicking fairway dives into a valley, then climbs back up to the green.


Players opting for the right side of the fairway may get more run-out on their drives, but they’ll be left with a tougher approach shot to a green where OB looms quite close to the right.


A look at the 18th green – another large target with some subtle contouring.


Quite serendipitously, during the U.S. Open qualifying tournament, I ran into Mike McGuire, a GCA contributor and steward of all things Langford/Moreau at his home West Bend Country Club.  McGuire knew Ozaukee had an old map of the original Langford/Moreau, and we set off to find it in the clubhouse. Here’s what we found.


The routing is the same, save for one interesting change (for reference, hole #1 runs along the right side of the frame; #18 runs along the bottom of the frame). Here’s the one change in the routing – the original tee for the par 3 6th hole was to the right of the 5th hole green, with another tee left of that. The current #6 tee is in the far northeastern corner of the course property, above the area marked “compost/vegetable garden” on the original map.


Note the elaborate bunkering in the large-scale map, and on the close-ups of holes  #6 and #1 (bunkers are represented by enclosed forms with small dots).


In some cases, the bunkers are nearly as large – or larger – than some of the greens. They were also more numerous – on #18 (lower portion of the large map), two enormous bunkers tighten the landing area of the fairway, and another large fairway bunker looms some 50 yards short of the green left. Several of the bunkers are designed with muscular mounds behind them, ala what the golfer finds repeatedly at Lawsonia.

Here are some old aerials (courtesy of GCA contributor Dan Moore) of Acacia CC, a NLE Langford in Chicago built three years after Ozaukee with similar elaborate bunkering that Langford originally designed for Ozaukee.



An old aerial of Ozaukee (date unknown, probably more than 50 years ago), with only a smattering of trees.  The 6th hole (bottom right of aerial) appears to be playing from its original tee, instead of the current tee, now located near two buildings in the lower right-hand corner of the aerial.


Jeff Shelman

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2010, 12:37:29 PM »
Phil,

Thanks for the work on this. These are the kind of things that I love about this site.

Here is a question that I have (though I'm sure you don't have the answer): I would love to know the motivation for lengthening the two par 3s. Because from the surface it seems like simply a yardage play that takes away from the flow of the course.

Previously the back tee yardage was 173-209-158-171-188. I don't the direction that these holes all run, but there is at least a little bit of variety.

Now the lengths are 173-209-188-207-188. So instead of having essentially four different yardages for par 3s like before, they now only have three. And after you get through the first one, you have two yardages for four holes. I know hole locations can play a factor in club selection and true yardage, but this makes me scratch my head.

My former club truly got into the quest for yardage game when the most recent work was done. When completed, the second hole and seventh hole (which run in exactly the same direction) ended up with basically the same yardage from the back tees and on a lot of days it was the same club on both holes. I thought it took away some of the interest of the golf course.

All that said, Ozaukee looks like it would be a super fun place to play. And Milwaukee seems to be similar to Minneapolis in that there are a number of clubs that have strong courses that many haven't heard of.

Eric Smith

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2010, 01:32:09 PM »
Thanks for the photo tour Phil.  Love the high lip on the front bunker at the 6th, which if I'm understanding your post correctly, wasn't designed to be a carry bunker at all, but a greenside bunker?

Have you been down to Tennessee yet to see Morristown?  Why don't you come down sometime and let's go see... :)
« Last Edit: May 26, 2010, 01:43:45 PM by Eric Smith »

Dale Jackson

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2010, 01:44:35 PM »
Phil, outstanding tour, I love the contour of the greens.  Threads like this are what make this DG so useful.
I've seen an architecture, something new, that has been in my mind for years and I am glad to see a man with A.V. Macan's ability to bring it out. - Gene Sarazen

Phil McDade

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2010, 01:58:16 PM »
Jeff:

The par 3s at Ozaukee run directionally:

#4 -- North northeast (not quite due north) -- 173/155 yds (somewhat uphill, perhaps a club's worth)
#6 -- Straight south (this is the one that used to run southeast) -- 209/184 yds (quite downhill, at least a club less, maybe two clubs less)
#9 -- Almost due south, a little bit southeasterly -- was 158/140 yds, now with a back tee that can go 180 (slightly uphill; I can see some players adding a club here)
#14 -- Straight north -- was 171/154, now with a back tee that can go 210 (it was 207 for the qualifying tourney; very similar look to #4 in a similar part of the course, most players probably add a club here.)
#16 -- North/northwest -- 188/150 (the most level tee shot among the par 3s, but the pond and reworked, very deep bunkers maybe puts the golfer in the mind of adding a club just to avoid the front-of-the-green trouble).

The prevailing wind in this area, particularly late spring/summer, tends to be out of the west on a typical day, out of the south/southwest with weather approaching, and out of the north after a weather system moves through. It's not that far from Lake Michigan (a few miles as the crow flies) although I'd be hard-pressed to say the big lake has much of an effect on the wind.

I'm not the biggest fan of the lengthening, and in particular the added length at #14 creates a very awkward walkback from the 13th green on a course that already has some awkward transitions between holes (the back tee at #14 is not that far from the fairway landing area of the nearby 13th hole). I will say holes #6 and #14 likely played at least one, perhaps two or three, clubs difference on the day I was there -- although about the same length, they play in opposite directions and the wind that day was hard out of the north. (Guys were playing hybrids and some fairway woods at #14.) Holes #4 and 16 probably played at a similar club length for many players, as #16's slight length advantage was negated by #4's uphill nature.

The lengthening at #9 seemed to fit better -- it doesn't really add much in the walk from the 8th green -- but it also left the course without a truly short par 3 from the tips.

Langford was known for designing very solid par 3s, and in particular in providing great variety (length, direction, downhill vs. uphill) within a course's par 3s. Lawsonia is a pretty great example of this, but if you ever get a chance to visit Spring Valley, that's another course with great variety and strength in its par 3s. While Ozaukee's are solid, and the greens themselves quite good, I thought this set of par 3s was of a lesser caliber than I've seen on other Langford courses.

This aerial provides some additional perspective on the hole locations and directions:

http://wsga.bluegolf.com/bluegolf/wsga10/event/wsga102/course/ozaukeecc/aerial.htm?next=%2Fbluegolf%2Fwsga10%2Fevent%2Fwsga102%2Findex.htm#hole=1




Phil McDade

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2010, 02:09:08 PM »
Thanks for the photo tour Phil.  Love the high lip on the front bunker at the 6th, which if I'm understanding your post correctly, wasn't designed to be a carry bunker at all, but a greenside bunker?

Have you been down to Tennessee yet to see Morristown?  Why don't you come down sometime and let's go see... :)

Eric:

I've heard some really interesting things about Morristown. Would love to get down there sometime. I assume you've played it?

Yes, the bunker at #6 was not originally a fronting bunker -- although I'm not entirely sure whether that lip is original to that bunker (the bunker position is, however...). I've been told Killian and Nugent did some work on Ozaukee in the 1970s or 80s.


Jud_T

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2010, 02:35:35 PM »
Phil,

Great coverage of a couple of still underrated GCA's, although not perhaps here. You should check out Butterfield C.C. if you get the chance...Interesting writeup from Ozaukee's website (hope springs eternal!):

The Ozaukee Country Club Golf Course was originally designed links-style in 1922, with open fairways and plenty of visibility. Over the years however, the course has evolved and grown into a mature, traditional-style course and is a “must play” experience.

Golf is a game. We play it. Somewhere along the way we took the fun out of it and charged a premium to be punished.- - Ron Sirak

Eric Smith

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2010, 02:51:02 PM »
Thanks for the photo tour Phil.  Love the high lip on the front bunker at the 6th, which if I'm understanding your post correctly, wasn't designed to be a carry bunker at all, but a greenside bunker?

Have you been down to Tennessee yet to see Morristown?  Why don't you come down sometime and let's go see... :)

Eric:

I've heard some really interesting things about Morristown. Would love to get down there sometime. I assume you've played it?


I have played there, though it was almost 25 years ago in a high school tournament.  I don't remember a whole lot about the gc, but I do remember three putting quite a few times as the greens were slick,slick,slick.  It's simply known as The Country Club (hey Brookline!) where they have a gem of a PGA professional there in Bobby Bray.  It is only about 40 minutes from Holston Hills so we could play there too if you decided to come down. 

Phil McDade

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2010, 02:54:38 PM »
Jud:

How much Langford is there at Butterfield? I hear conflicting reports...

Ozaukee is a nice, solid, parkland course -- I think it's a notch or two below Milwaukee CC for the Milwaukee-area Golden Age courses, and I'm hoping to get two a few others (notably Blue Mound and Tripoli) this year for additional comparisons/write-ups. Ozaukee's also not quite in the same league as Lawsonia among the Langfords I've seen, but it's a solid test of golf, and the greens are the stars. No question Ozaukee could stand to lose a few (hundred?) trees -- having seen some before-and-after pics of courses that have undertaken such efforts (Flossmoor comes immediately to mind), I think it would benefit the course alot.


Jud_T

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2010, 03:00:26 PM »
Not sure, but there are some pretty bold rolling hills there, particularly by Illinois standards.  Smyers did the renovation with the Langford philosophy in mind:

http://www.cybergolf.com/golf_news/smyers_to_update_butterfield_cc

Golf is a game. We play it. Somewhere along the way we took the fun out of it and charged a premium to be punished.- - Ron Sirak

SL_Solow

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2010, 03:23:14 PM »
Have you seen Butterfield?  I only saw plans but it looked like a nearly complete remake with significant routing changes.  The existing layout had little left of L & M after multiple revisions.  I expect the new Butterfield to be quite good as Smyers work is almost always quite interesting but it is unlikely that it will be a L & M course.

Jud_T

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2010, 03:29:04 PM »
SL_Played it once just prior to the renovation...You may well be right about how much original work is still there... Great piece of property to work with...I thought the original genesis of the work had to do with the water table issues and the creek, and it expanded out from there :

"Bringing back Langford's traditional landing areas is the most important factor," Smyers said. "We have the original routing and aerial photos from the 1930s, '50s and '60s, and you can easily see the landing areas he meant to have on the ridges, hillsides and little plateaus."

Smyers will also restore the original bunker patterns and greens contours, while increasing the 18-hole course's current 6,600-yard distance from the back tees to 7,200 yards. The property sits on 195 acres, so finding the extra distance caused no problems.
Golf is a game. We play it. Somewhere along the way we took the fun out of it and charged a premium to be punished.- - Ron Sirak

Keith Buntrock

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #13 on: May 26, 2010, 03:41:48 PM »
I was a caddy in this US Open local qualifier that day and I see I was able to elude all of Phil's photos here.

Phil sums it up pretty well.

The superintendent did a great job getting the greens smooth and slick, as it has been tough Spring in this area. Winter left many greens near Lake Michigan without a lot of grass.  

PThomas

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #14 on: May 26, 2010, 03:45:49 PM »
fwiw, someone told me Butterfield is reopening this weekend...
198 played, only 2 to go!!

Phil McDade

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2010, 04:19:32 PM »
I was a caddy in this US Open local qualifier that day and I see I was able to elude all of Phil's photos here.

Phil sums it up pretty well.

The superintendent did a great job getting the greens smooth and slick, as it has been tough Spring in this area. Winter left many greens near Lake Michigan without a lot of grass.  


Keith:

I was trolling through some golf comments board (might have been the Milwaukee paper) where there were some comments about the greens of courses near Lake Michigan having some real difficulty this year -- apparently the winter warming of the lake left some of the courses with no snow cover, then a hard rain and freeze really set them back. Different than courses even a few miles inland -- here in the Madison area, most folks say golf courses have never looked better, and McGuire said his West Bend CC is running really fast and firm. I thought the greens at Ozaukee were in very good shape, given the winter conditions. I hear they have a new superintendent from a fairly high profile course-- maybe Congressional?

That struck me as a tough day at the qualifying tourney -- very tough winds. I think one player out of 70-some broke par. Some tough pins that day, too. ;)


Keith Buntrock

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Re: Ozaukee Country Club -- 1921 Langford/Moreau (pictorial essay)
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2010, 12:21:51 AM »
Phil:

That's pretty consistent with what I have heard from people. Brown Deer Park I was told had no grass on 14 of the 18 greens. Similar story with the Ross designed Kenosha CC. Although the private club I work at in Racine came through the winter okay and it is just 2 miles from the lake.

The Ozaukee greens were in pristine condition considering the winter. I had never seen Ozaukee and with the way the course was set up, I'm glad I was a caddy instead of a player. The pins were all tucked and the greens were very slick for the amount of internal green contours. I didn't think that there were many more pin-able locations on 8 with the greens at that speed. The two guys who were pin high and right of the hole on 12 putted it off the green. I have no ambition to be embarrassed in that manor. My guy had played the course a bunch and still shot 80.

Glad to hear that West Bend is in excellent playing condition. I get to make a visit there for a tournament in June. I did get to play the Langford 9 in high school once there, but back then (3 years) I didn't know what I was looking at. I'm looking forward to going back. Next week I get to play Lawsonia for the first time as well. Which completes the tour of Langford courses in WI for me. I have been to Spring Valley a few times, but have only played there during the winter as it stays open pretty much year round.

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