News:

This discussion group is best enjoyed using Google Chrome, Firefox or Safari.


Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
The Hollows Of HUNTERCOMBE: 2017-18 Winter Tour New
« on: November 25, 2007, 05:11:23 PM »
Huntercombe, along with Willie Park Jr’s other ground breaking masterpiece, Sunningdale, opened in 1901 (incidentally his Notts design also opened in 1901) and helped spark a revolution in inland golf design.  Walter Travis commented “I consider that Huntercombe is easily the best laid course that I have ever played over anywhere”. Harold Hilton agreed, “In links architecture his two great creations have been Sunningdale and Huntercombe and of the two I am distinctly inclined to look upon Huntercombe as the greater effort of the two”. Bernard Darwin was greatly impressed with the course and wrote “Although Huntercombe is still a comparatively young course, there is an agreeable quality about the golf that, for want of a better word, may be called, very respectfully, old-fashioned.  At any rate, the golf of Huntercombe has a very engaging character of its own; it is good without being too strenuous for the reasonably light-hearted player. Yet this cheerful person must not imagine the disaster cannot overtake him.”

See the link for the full Golf Magazine article that Travis wrote concerning his 1901 trip to Britain.
https://walterjtravissociety.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/1901-impressions-of-british-golf-from-golf-mag118.pdf

Like most early 20th century designs, trees have invaded what was originally open land, though Park Jr would certainly recognize much of his handiwork if he were to walk the course today.  As one would expect from an older course which has had few revisions, Huntercombe is on the short side at approximately 6300 yards. However, originally the course was much longer; several holes have lost yardage (according to old scorecards and maps), but in some cases the reasons for the loss of yardage aren't clear.  It should be mentioned that Sunningdale's Old Course was also considered to be very long.  Indeed, Bernard Darwin thought the introduction of the Haskell was a great benefit to the course.  Whatever the reasons for the yardage changes, they seem to have happened quite early in the evolution of Huntercombe and that it is likely Park Jr carried out the work. 

1946 Aerial


Huntercombe stands nearly 700 feet above sea level, one of the highest points in the Chilterns and it is easy to imagine how wind would have played a significant role in stiffening the challenge.  The 13 remaining bunkers (many have been converted to hollows) are in the main placed to offer the golfer a choice of playing heroically or safely.  In addition to bunkers there are hollows dotted about the course which greatly effect the decision making of golfers.  Although, some of these hollows originally contained sand. Not unusually, a road, The Ridgeway, one of the oldest roadways in Europe, divides the course.  Unfortunately, the increase in traffic in recent years has precipitated the club to alter the 6th by planting trees down the right and filling in one of the hollows on the left side of the fairway.

Despite the critical success of the design, due to financial difficulties caused by the failure of the planned real estate development, Park lost a substantial amount of money.  However, high profile work continued to come Park’s way.  His talents were further utilized for many more marquee designs; amongst which were Formby, West Hill and Worplesdon.  With the exception of the loss of a handful of key bunkers, ironically, the early financial difficulties Huntercombe suffered may be the very reason the course is fairly well preserved.  Unlike Sunningdale, Huntercombe is just far enough removed from London to have effectively become an historical footnote in golf architecture.  Despite two holes which are All England candidates (#s 2 & 3), Huntercombe fails to make any modern best of lists.  More is the pity because Huntercombe exemplifies concepts which were previously the domain of links golf.  Variety, use of natural and man made landforms and strategic merit are features which made the course justly famous over 100 years ago and continue to delight members and visitors alike today.





When the 1st was originally designed (as the 6th) the tee was meant to be where the shoe cleaner is on the far side of the clubhouse.  When looking at the green this tee location makes sense as play would have been between hollows to a green moving in a reverse wave as seen on other holes at Huntercombe.  Alas, at the time Park didn't own the land (perhaps he thought it was included in the purshase) which now contains the house and putting green.  Today the hole is still very good if quite a bit shorter and playing over a hollow.  Below is Mr Sheehy and the tricky green running away from play. 


#2!!  Originally the depression and mounding was the left boundary of the hole until the club rented and eventually purchased the left side of fairway corridor.  This may not be an original green as it may be the case that the green was much further down the hill, well behind the 3rd tee.  Although, the gulley feeding into the hard front to back sloping green is a stroke of genius.




#3!!  Boony on the left.


4th - zowie!


There is an area of short grass between the hollow and left side of the green which I reckon should be part of the putting surface. 


It isn't until the 5th that we come across a bunker!  This hole was also part of the yardage contraction.  The club has recently built a tee a bit further behind the main tee to recapture some of the original length. Half the holes on the course are bereft of sand and only one hole has more than two bunkers.  While the hollows are important features, many of the lost centreline bunkers were fairly large and would have made for a more thrilling experience than what is in the ground today.  Incidentally, the map also shows how trees have encroached on the property. See the link to the excellent site created by Mark Bourgeois.

http://golfcoursehistories.com/HC.html

We can see the narrowing effect which the trees on the right create for the 6th.  For the most part this is a necessary evil to protect the road flanking the hole.  IMO, the road would be better protected if the hole were turned into a dogleg right.  This would necessitate tree removal up the left and at least a partial shared fairway with the 18th. 


The hollows were once filled with sand. 


The 7th is a mess on the tee with trees pointlessly encroaching and casting shadows from the left.  Also, behind the green half the trees could be cleared out to increase sunlight.  For all the tree problems, this is an excellent longish short hole. 


Extending the green forward 15 yards between the mounds would add quite a bit of zest to this hole. 


One of Huntercombe's few long, testing 4s, the 8th is marked for its creative two-tier green which rises in a rounded fashion rather than the abrupt levels often seen.  It is thought Park Jr modelled this hole after Musselburgh's famous Pandy (Pandemonium Bunker) hole; which he would have known very well as it was Park Jr's home green.  Orginally there was a large cross bunker to be carried in front of the tee, presumably this was the Pandy.  Just shy of the green is a shallow hollow which once housed two centreline bunkers.


The back tier not long after opening.


9 is a canny, shortish two-shotter legging hard left. Very reminiscent of Simpson, a large hollow is shy of the green.  Pictured is Mr Moore of Maine parts.


The 10th is yet another fine par 3 with a sole fronting bunker and a runaway green for defense.  The cross bunkers on the 11th come into play for bigger hitters, but this hole is really more about accuracy. 


12 is a excellent par 4 whose green is protected much like the 10th with a lone centreline bunker.  This photo of the 13th is a good representation of the many seamless fairway to green transitions which make depth perception difficult to calculate.


The ever-present hollows are often the main talking point of the Willie Park Jr's design, but it is the compelling greens which are the real star of the show.  Due to the greens being at grade level (except for 17!) it is beyond my powers to capture the brilliant subtleties. 


The 14th would have been a very difficult starting hole when William Morris was the owner of Huntercombe.  The old clubhouse was across the A 4130 (Oxford to Henley on Thames road) and is now a National Trust and shrine to William Morris. 


The house was replaced by the current house in 1963.  Obviously, the new house necessitated a change in the hole numbering and it is at this time I think the current par 3 first was altered to make way for the house.  In recent years, OOB stakes were placed along the right side of the 14th fairway to protect the house which is in range of flat bellies.  Below is a photo when there weren't trees on the left!


15 is a lovely par 3 played to a bowl green.  The final par 5, #16 turns aggressively right along the property boundary and for the ambitious, a large hollow awaits for the second shot. 




The dimunitive 17th, but its 266 yards is not the reason this hole stands out!


An  old photo of the waste area short of 18 green, when many of the hollows contained sand.


Most will disagree with me, but I believe Huntercombe is a strong candidate for an English first tier course. The only drawback of the course is the over-abundance of trees which try their best to transform Huntercombe into a routine parkland course.  Indeed, the presence of so many oaks is thought to be due to Lady Nuffield refusing to allow seedlings to be uprooted.  In recent years there has been traction within the club to clear out some trees; the first and 17th being great examples of the tree work.  There are still a ton of trees which can be removed, but despite the over-abundance of lumber I am immensely impressed with how this fairly flat piece of property manages to hold my attention for the entire round. Between front to back and a few crazy greens and the relationship between the hollows in the fairways and the slopes around the greens, there is a lot to ponder. Every hole has something about it which requires a bit of thought even if its an afterthought. 2017

There has been some suggestion that Willie Park Jr's Huntercombe design didn't have a great impact on the world of golf design.  Yes, Huntercombe quickly became a backwater due to the financial failure of the project and eventual purchase of the property by Lord Nuffield.  However, it can be no accident that within five years of the club's foundation that five would be well known architects became members. Stuart Paton was a member when he initiated the famous changes at Woking with J Low. CK Hutchison later became a well known figure in the business as a partner with Guy Campbell (was also an early member) and SV Hotchkin; incidentally, both Paton and Hutchison were among the first club captains.  Hugh Alison was a long time partner of HS Colt and creator of many courses on his own in Japan and the US. JF Abercromby, creator and benevolent dictator of Addington would later join forces with A Croome, Fowler and T Simpson with Liphook being Croome's only solo effort.  Indeed, HS Colt himself became a member in 1924! The direct and indirect links between these architects reads like a whos who of original inland strategic design!  In later years Ken Cotton (partner with Frank Pennink and later Donald Steel) was a member and it is likely that he had some input when the new clubhouse was built.  It is also known that CB Macdonald visited Huntercombe on 9 May 1906 as a guest of CK Hutchison. He signed his name and Garden City, USA, which is interesting for fans of W Travis.


If one finds himself in the London/Oxford area strongly consider following in the footsteps of the famous lady magician and one-club golfer, Gloria Minoprio.  She started her golfing career at Huntercombe by taking lessons from then professional Jim Morris and for anyone thinking of touring the inland courses of England I can think of few better places to start than Huntercombe.  2017

Ms Minoprio teeing off on Burnham & Berrow's 1st.


See Ran's Review.
http://golfclubatlas.com/courses-by-country/england/huntercombe-golf-club/

Ciao
« Last Edit: March 24, 2022, 03:13:49 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies, Meadowbrook, Dunes Club & Crystal Downs

Tommy Williamsen

  • Karma: +0/-0
Sean, Huntercombe is won of those courses that I think about playing every time I get to England.  Looks like I'll have to get it done the next time.  Thanks, as always, for the pictures.
Tom Williamsen
Where there is no love, put love; there you will find love.
St. John of the Cross

Michael Whitaker

  • Karma: +0/-0
Sean - The thing that struck me about Huntercombe is how almost the entire course could be replicated on just about any decent piece of property. There are so many unique features on the course that could be incorporated into a modern day endeavor... but, the features are not really site specific. Most of the ridges, hollows, and troughs could be recreated just about anywhere. It is an extremely interesting course and tons of fun. I think the course could be a model for how to create an interesting test of golf that will stand the test of time. Fantastic!
"Solving the paradox of proportionality is the heart of golf architecture."  - Tom Doak (11/20/05)

PPallotta

  • Karma: +0/-0
Sean
yet again, my thanks for the pictures and commentary.  

Micheal - that's a good point, about it being 'replicated'. If only they'd replicate the almost complete lack of bunkers too. I like bunkers well enough, but isn't it interesting how you don't seem to need/miss bunkers on courses that don't have bunkers?

Peter

Jason McNamara

Great pics, Sean.

Just to get a better idea of what you mean, how big (for you) is England's 1st tier?

And does it include Kington?   ;)

Rich Goodale

Sean

I think it is incumbent on you and Philip to organise a mini-BUDA at Huntercombe, ideally in the early Autumn.
Conisder the ball in your court.

I agree fully with Mike on the apparent true minimalism of the course, and it reminds me a lot of the one Park Jr. course I know well in its understatement and economical use of what natural features there are on the property.  Another big plus, of course, is the virtual absence of bunkers.

I also wonder as does Jason what you consider the English "top tier."  I'll guess that Sandwich, Birkdale, Lytham, Rye, Hoylake would be included.  wWho else?

Slainte

Rich

Philip Gawith

  • Karma: +0/-0
I was wondering how you enjoyed your visit Sean. Glad you got some sunshine, albeit of the burr variety! I was there yesterday on a fine day and the course was playing well.

I agree with you re the tree on 3 which is really just a manky little bush. Less persuaded re the one on 5. Isn't that just analogous to some of the more cussed bunkers around the Old Course? You know they are there so you must miss them?

Hole 17 remains a great matchplay hole, coming where it does in the round - you think a 3 should be on, but so often end up with more. The little pitch ends up in a chunk into the front bunkers etc. You really have to make a decision about where to leave your drive - and then your heart is in your mouth executing the second, so I am not sure it deserves your censure!

The 8th remains a brute - I hit a fantastic drive yesterday which left me with a 6 iron second, which I hit pretty well, but landed half-way into the tier/bank - and walked away with a six. Grrrrrr!

Glad to that you have started to enjoy the 13th green!

I am sorry I wasn't able to join you - the steward told me that something like 100 people went through the course on Friday which is a huge amount for a wintry Friday!

Tony_Muldoon

  • Karma: +0/-0
this is all a bit vague so excuse me while I ramble.

I read somewhere that the 8th at Huntercombe was based upon a green at Mussleburgh Old which I believe to be the 6th?



on 29th May I am riding 100 Miles to help raise funds for Dementia Research. All donations are welcome.
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ridelondon-tonymuldoon

Mark Pearce

  • Karma: +0/-0
I love Huntercombe.  It was the first really good golf course I ever played and one I play more than others.  However, I don't think it quite makes the top tier.  Courses which I have played and which, in my book at least, are in a tier above Huntercombe include (in no specific order), Hoylake, Woodhall Spa, Ganton, Alwoodley, Hollinwell, Saunton, Burnham & Berrow, Silloth, both Berkshire courses and Swinley Forest.

Why does Huntercombe fall (just) short of that level?  One or two week holes - Sean has previously drawn attention to the 5th, the 9th isn't that strong, 11 is a funny short par 4 and 18 is a slightly disappointing end to the round.  On the other hand I like 17, though I've never played it well, 3 and 4 are great green complexes, 8 is as tough a hole as you'll play, particularly when the pin is (as it always seems to be) on that shallow top shelf.  15 is a fun par 3 green, where my 10 year old son had his first ever birdie on a proper course last year, 14 is a good strong par 4.

I agree with Rich, a GCA get together at Huntercombe next Autumn would be a great idea.
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
« Last Edit: August 17, 2009, 05:31:46 AM by Sean Arble »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies, Meadowbrook, Dunes Club & Crystal Downs

Ed Tilley

  • Karma: +0/-0
I don't quite get Huntercombe - it's a nice course but I can't understand anyone saying it's a top tier course. I've probably played there 15-20 times, although this summer was the first time for 10 years or so. When I finally am able to play enough, as family and cricket commitments lessen, I will apply to be a member at Frilford Heath rather than Huntercombe. Logistically they are not much different - while I live 10 mins closer to Frilford, I work less than 10 mins from Huntercombe.

I find Huntercombe a bit too claustrophobic. Maybe it's just my erratic driving but I'm never very comfortable there. I would play both the Red and Green courses at Frilford over Huntercombe any day. Add the fact that, at Frilford, you can walk on as a 2 ball at 9am on a Saturday morning and be round in just over 3 hours then the question of where you would be a member is the archetypal 'no brainer'.

Philip Gawith

  • Karma: +0/-0
Mark - I think you are wrong about 5 - a good hole, with or without the tree, with the difficulty lying in judging the distance of the second. It is very easy to three putt this green if you are any distance away. For the same reason, I think you are wrong about 9 which is a "sleeper", but more difficult than it looks. The green slopes away, and it has a great natural hazard in the form of the dip in front of the green which presents challenges, especially in summer when you can't fly the green with your approach. I agree re 11 - the weakest hole on the course, albeit i take 5 more often than I care!


Ed - each to his own (you are right re claustrophobia - the trees could certainly do with more cutting back) but what you describe re arriving at 9am on Saturday, without booking, and playing in three hours, is of course what all Huntercombe members enjoy and expect.

Sean - re 5 and 17. You are probably right that the waste-type rough bunkers on 5 are enough of an obstacle. The most competitive player in the club famously hates the tree!

Re 17 - the same player who is good rather than long-hitting always tries to drive the 17th green, in the belief that 20% of the time he will fluke it through the bunkers, but confidentt he other 80% of the time that he may get his birdie from the bunker. He beat me in a match by driving the 17th to birdie it!

To Rich's suggestion - I would be delighted to host such an event. If we get the timing right we might even get GMBF to turn up on his autumn trip!

In terms of where the course ranks - it does not have the same majesty as some other top sites that have been mentioned, because it is not an exceptional piece of land. Any maybe it lacks the memorable holes that are often said to warrant elevation to the first rank. Perhaps it is a bit like Simpson/Wethered's comment on Woking that while only the 2nd is world class, there is no course they would rather play.

From another angle: given that 16 of the holes are flat, WP Jr did a wonderful job of creating golfing interest which endures to this day. And the interest remains despite lack of length, few bunkers and no water.

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
In terms of where the course ranks - it does not have the same majesty as some other top sites that have been mentioned, because it is not an exceptional piece of land. Any maybe it lacks the memorable holes that are often said to warrant elevation to the first rank. Perhaps it is a bit like Simpson/Wethered's comment on Woking that while only the 2nd is world class, there is no course they would rather play.

Philip

I am usually much more taken by interesting properties which can support entertaining golf without the obvious intervention of heavy handed archies.  Huntercombe doesn't enjoy the  advantage of varied terrain though the land is well drained.  I am bewildered (honestly, liking a course like Huntercombe is not consistent with my usual favourites) as to how Huntercombe so successfully offers interesting golf hole after hole seemingly with few features (and these are man made and quite obviously so) which easily lend themselves to creative golf.  In this way, I don't think I have ever experienced such a crafty course which is so varied despite the obvious drawbacks of the land.  If I lived in the north or west area of The Smoke Huntercombe is certainly one of the clubs I would target to join.  

Ciao

« Last Edit: November 26, 2007, 09:32:02 AM by Sean Arble »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies, Meadowbrook, Dunes Club & Crystal Downs

Brent Hutto

I am bewildered (honestly, liking a course like Huntercombe is not consistent with my usual favourites) as to how Huntercombe so successfully offers interesting golf hole after hole seemingly with few features (and these are man made and quite obviously so) which easily lend themselves to creative golf.  In this way, I don't think I have ever experienced such a crafty course which is so varied despite the obvious drawbacks of the land.  If I lived in the north or west area of The Smoke Huntercombe is certainly one of the clubs I would target to join.

Amen. I came away from my day at Huntercombe with two impressions. One was there wasn't really much to it. Aside from the stirring view from the second tee it's in lovely but fairly unexceptional surroundings. The other takeaway was that I absolutely loved playing there and can't wait to return. Apparently, it doesn't take much in the way of flash or WOW to provide me my little golf game with all the challenge and variety I crave.

Like Mike Whitaker, it makes me wonder how other courses in at least as favorable a setting can be so boring. It sure doesn't seem be a course that can't be duplicated. Yet it was in the best 20 or so courses I've ever played. Fascinating question.

Mark Pearce

  • Karma: +0/-0
I think one of the great skills of the Golden Age architects was to do a good or great job on fairly plain land.  Huntercombe isn't a great bit of land but Park gets something out of every feature on it (putting 3 on the side of the hill to give that great green site, the 4th green, the 8th green, the fall away green on 13, 15 green).  It think this is something that Colt, Mackenzie and Braid were also good at.  Perhaps in an age where moving and shaping the landform is easier this is a less well developed skill.
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

Philip Gawith

  • Karma: +0/-0
Tony I forgot to reply to your point - I think you are right about Willie Park jr getting the idea for the 8th at Huntercombe from Musselburgh. My initial feeling was that the green was so hard as to be gimicky, but now that I have grown up I value it for its eccentricity! With the pin on the top (as it is 95% of the time), it is a fiendishly difficult hole. Maybe 1 in 25 times you will get onto the top tier in two; maybe 1 in a dozen times you will two-putt from the bottom tier (and you have to hit two good shots to get there). If you miss the green or lay up, you will get up and down maybe 1 in 15 times. All in all, a tough par 4!

Michael Whitaker

  • Karma: +0/-0
I think one of the great skills of the Golden Age architects was to do a good or great job on fairly plain land.  Huntercombe isn't a great bit of land but Park gets something out of every feature on it (putting 3 on the side of the hill to give that great green site, the 4th green, the 8th green, the fall away green on 13, 15 green).  It think this is something that Colt, Mackenzie and Braid were also good at.  Perhaps in an age where moving and shaping the landform is easier this is a less well developed skill.

Mark - I was under the impression that most of the ridges, gulleys, and depressions found on Huntercombe were man-made. Perhaps Philip could address this question.
"Solving the paradox of proportionality is the heart of golf architecture."  - Tom Doak (11/20/05)

Jason McNamara

No, Kington falls a bit short of star status, but it is highly recommended none the less.

Sorry, Sean - just teasing a bit.... I know that despite for love for Kington you don't have it in your top tier.

Back to Huntercombe:  Maybe not in your top ten, but in with say Worplesdon and Woking?

Mark Pearce

  • Karma: +0/-0
I think one of the great skills of the Golden Age architects was to do a good or great job on fairly plain land.  Huntercombe isn't a great bit of land but Park gets something out of every feature on it (putting 3 on the side of the hill to give that great green site, the 4th green, the 8th green, the fall away green on 13, 15 green).  It think this is something that Colt, Mackenzie and Braid were also good at.  Perhaps in an age where moving and shaping the landform is easier this is a less well developed skill.

Mark - I was under the impression that most of the ridges, gulleys, and depressions found on Huntercombe were man-made. Perhaps Philip could address this question.
Michael,

there are a lot of man-made obstacles at Huntercombe.  I assume that the mounds and depressions (almost grass bunkers) throughout the course are artificial (the gully daiagonally siding 2 fairway, the depressions and mounds on 6, mounds on 7, mounds fronting 10, mounds on 11 etc).  However, by modern standards not a lot of earth was moved manufacturing these.  This was originally a very plain piece of land.  What I meant to say is that where there was any interesting natural movement Park got the very best of it.
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: HUNTERCOMBE: A 1st Tier Course?
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2009, 05:24:05 AM »
Take a look at the updated thread.  I had yet another wonderful day Huntercombe and I am sure James enjoyed the course.  Perhaps he has some pix to add.

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies, Meadowbrook, Dunes Club & Crystal Downs

Chris Buie

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: HUNTERCOMBE: A 1st Tier Course?
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2009, 07:28:00 AM »
Sean, I enjoyed your photos and commentary.  I must admit I do not recall hearing about Huntercombe.  I don't know if it is first tier but it is very appealing from what I can see.  It seems like one of those courses you wouldn't ever get tired of playing.
Hearing about and seeing the great little, less celebrated tracks is one of the things I particularly like about this forum.

Bill_McBride

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: HUNTERCOMBE: A 1st Tier Course?
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2009, 09:29:38 AM »
I'm looking forward to a round at Huntercombe on our arrival day for the Buda Cup.  This looks like a very charming course with a lot of quirky almost antique features, all those mounds and little gullies.   It's a very appealing look and I like the grade level greens.  That's a forgotten thing on most American courses these days.

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: HUNTERCOMBE: A 1st Tier Course?
« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2009, 06:07:21 PM »
I'm looking forward to a round at Huntercombe on our arrival day for the Buda Cup.  This looks like a very charming course with a lot of quirky almost antique features, all those mounds and little gullies.   It's a very appealing look and I like the grade level greens.  That's a forgotten thing on most American courses these days.

Ace

I wonder when grade level geens started to fall by the wayside.  Like many things with modern architecture, I suspect Colt's name should be mentioned.  The more I really look at Colt's work the more I realize how influential he was.

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies, Meadowbrook, Dunes Club & Crystal Downs

Michael Whitaker

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: HUNTERCOMBE: A 1st Tier Course?
« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2009, 09:58:04 PM »
Sean - Reviewing this thread makes me once again wish more golfers and architects were familiar with Huntercombe. It is an excellent model for how an outstanding course can be constructed on an average piece of property. I can think of dozens of local courses that could use a dose of "Huntercombe-ization."
"Solving the paradox of proportionality is the heart of golf architecture."  - Tom Doak (11/20/05)

Bill_McBride

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: HUNTERCOMBE: A 1st Tier Course?
« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2009, 10:19:12 PM »
Very disappointed.  I got out my Bernard Darwin "Golf Courses of the British Isles" to check out the Kent links courses we'll be playing in the Buda Cup, plus Rye and Littlestone (all 4 lovingly described, Sandwich and Deal plus Rye and Deal).  While there I checked for Huntercombe and was disappointed to see that Darwin mentions the course on three separate pages, all in very positive terms, but didn't include a full write up as he does for Sunningdale, Woking, etc from that era around London.

So Sean, your pictorial tour is the pre-round research I'll be able to do.  Luckily you did a really nice job!  Thanks for that.

Tags:
Tags:

An Error Has Occurred!

Call to undefined function theme_linktree()
Back