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Mike Sweeney

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Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #125 on: June 15, 2019, 06:37:13 AM »
Also, 120+ posts in this thread on "private golf at a crossroads" without a mention of women golfers, millennial or otherwise.


My wife does Qualitative Research for BIG American brands, and it is very rare that those brands care about anything other than "Head of Household" research. That is code for women, and it is they who make the decisions. My personal view is there are:
  • Country Clubs with golf
  • Private Golf Clubs
  • Every other type of golf that pulls people away from the above
If I ran a Country Club, I would really only care what the woman wanted...
"One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we’ve been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us."

Dr. Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

corey miller

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Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #126 on: June 15, 2019, 08:37:05 AM »



Throwing out the use of the euphemism "head of household"...I am sure the "decision maker" in the country club and golf club universe is quite different than the population at large and certainly different than that which you would use for large american brands.


Very faulty assumption in the golf world but I guess that is why the Mcmahon Group is on speed dial for a lot of clubs. 

Mike Bodo

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Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #127 on: June 15, 2019, 08:45:52 AM »
Wow, I was away for business this past week and come home to see this topic has taken on a life of its own. I haven't even made it past the first page yet, but I am glad to see the discussion that's ensued. Hopefully no blood has been drawn in the process.  ;) Thanks for everyone's contributions!
"90% of all putts left short are missed." - Yogi Berra

SB

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Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #128 on: June 15, 2019, 10:12:11 AM »



Throwing out the use of the euphemism "head of household"...I am sure the "decision maker" in the country club and golf club universe is quite different than the population at large and certainly different than that which you would use for large american brands. 

Very faulty assumption in the golf world but I guess that is why the Mcmahon Group is on speed dial for a lot of clubs.


We did a study many years ago and came up with the figure that, in 80% of the cases, the woman was the decision maker.  It was about 20 years ago so couldn't tell you what the question was, but it was clear at the time that moms were the ones pulling the trigger.  This was a survey of new members and was done at country clubs, not golf only clubs. 
« Last Edit: June 15, 2019, 10:16:09 AM by SBusch »

Mike Bodo

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #129 on: June 15, 2019, 12:19:31 PM »
WHEW! Finally caught up. Some excellent comments and ideas discussed throughout this thread and great hearing from our Millennial contributors. I found many the talking points raised by SBusch relatable and spot-on. To add to what's already been shared and discussed, let me offer my own personal mico-case example to add to the mix.


Up until this year, I had been a member at a private SE Michigan club the past three years. I loved and still love the course, the historic clubhouse we had, the men's locker and grill, our gorgeous dining hall, swimming pool, staff, but most of all, the membership. Having caddied at two private clubs growing up - one of which being Oakland Hills - I saw first-hand how pretentious and high-falutin much of the membership at each was. Don't get me wrong, there were plenty of humble, generous, kind, funny and respectful members at both clubs, but there were enough of the former personality types to know that if I ever attained that type of wealth I probably wouldn't mix well with that group. Fast-forward 30 years and the club I eventually joined was closer in mindset and spirit to my college fraternity than it was the stuffy, elitist clubs I worked at as a kid. I felt right at home and my family and I enjoyed our time together there.


Regrettably and tragically, our iconic clubhouse (built in 1926) caught fire and burned down last June to the shock and dismay of everyone. While virtually everything inside the building was lost, we all pulled our boot-straps up and did our best to make the best of a difficult and unpleasant situation. Sadly, when it came time to renew my membership for 2019, I had a lot of tough decisions to make. For starters, I had no choice but to become a Class A member this year, which meant an increase in monthly dues in exchange for equity, whatever that really means in today's day and time. In addition, where I was previously assessed at 50% of the assessable amount, I would now pay 100%. To offset some of some of these costs I had hoped the club would reduce our annual fees seeing that a number of amenities we were paying for, i.e. private locker, sauna/showers, men's grill, patio, etc. were lost in the fire. While the club rented temporary lockers following the fire, which they placed in a separate building unaffected by it, you couldn't keep anything in them overnight, thus it was a poor substitute to having a personal private locker. In short, the club was losing it's cost-to-value proposition, as I would now be paying much more than I previously had in return for less in the form of amenities and services.

What sealed the deal for me leaving this club was the season walking pass offered by Washtenaw Golf Club (aka Washtenaw Country Club) a once private now daily fee course which was 15 min. closer to my home and every bit as good, if not arguably a better course than my private club. For less than $2k I receive unlimited golf, unlimited use of the driving range/practice facilities and a full-size private locker - including use of the locker room facilities. Having formerly been a private club, Washtenaw had all the amenities of my private club minus the swimming pool (which they shuttered two years ago) and tennis courts, which our club allowed to fall into disrepair and become an eye-sore. Do the math, I was paying over $12k annually at a second-tier private (including food/beverage) and would now pay a fraction of that at my new club, even with food and beverage thrown in. In addition, I could carry my bag or walk with a trolley whenever I wanted, which I couldn't do at our private club until after 3 PM. It was either get charged to use a cart or caddie if you were teeing off prior to that.

Having gone the daily fee route last year boosted Washtenaw's revenues. So much so that the owner who was operating it and the Polo Fields of Ann Arbor (a private golf club), sold the latter late last summer, which should tell you something. There are a lot of Millennials I see on the course at Washtenaw - especially on the weekends. That generation is very visible and well-represented, which bodes well for the game. In fact, at 54, I feel like one of the old guys now whereas at my former private club I was the median age. The one thing I don't receive with my pass (they refer to it as a membership) is preferred tee times, which isn't that big of a deal to me. Whether the club is making money or not is another question, but given how many weddings, banquets and events it hosts throughout the week and weekends, I have to believe they're doing okay.

After Washtenaw's clubhouse burnt down in 1981, the membership at the time had to borrow money to the tune of $1,000,000.00 to finish construction of its new clubhouse. Unfortunately, they could not pay the debt note off when it came due and when the great recession hit they ended up being sold to the Polo Fields group, where they continued operating as a private club for several years prior to going the semi-private and ultimately daily fee route. That said, a lot of former members still play there and, like me, are annual season pass holders.

I've heard through the grapevine that my former private club will have to borrow money to complete construction of its new clubhouse, which they haven't even begun building. In the meantime, revenues there are decreasing mainly due to attrition in the membership ranks (social and golfing), which as a byproduct affects golfing rounds, food/beverage purchases, pro shop purchases, etc. while expenses remain high as a result of the clubs decision to erect, maintain and operate a temporary clubhouse/dining room, kitchen and bathrooms. I suspect some of you can guess how this story will end, as in many ways it mirror's Washtenaw. However, I bring this up because it is an interesting contrast and case study of two diametrically opposed business models. Without seeing financial statements from either entity it's hard to know which is working and which isn't. All I know is that as a consumer, I prefer Washtenaw's model given the attractive cost-to-value proposition. In fact, other once private and semi-private clubs in my area such as Radrick Farms (Dye) and University of Michigan (MacKenzie) have adopted this same business model and now offer season golfing passes to the public at a greatly reduced rate to what a private membership would cost.

I'd be curious to hear of other once former private clubs having gone this route and to what degrees of success or failure they are having? In many respects, the creation of the annual golf pass mirrors that adopted by the ski industry years ago. Nearly every ski resort and operator in the U.S. offers some type of discounted annual pass. You'd be hard-pressed to find one that doesn't. A lot of these operators also belong to national/international ski pass networks, such as Epic (Vail Resorts), Ikon and Mountain Collective giving access to these resorts and destinations to non-locals. Perhaps we'll see a similar multi-pronged business and marketing approach adopted by private, semi-private and daily fee golf clubs whereby consumers have access to them on a local level, in addition to regionally, nationally and internationally via a mix of membership networks and holding companies (Club Corp.)? All I know is that nothing remains static forever and I suspect we're in the early phases of a major transformation taking place in the golf industry, which hopefully brings with it more affordability, accessibility and flexibility. Only time will tell.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2019, 12:56:47 PM by Mike Bodo »
"90% of all putts left short are missed." - Yogi Berra

Mike_Young

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #130 on: June 15, 2019, 12:38:47 PM »
Mike,Interesting take you have on Washtenaw. It's a tough deal and will be interesting to watch...
"just standing on a corner in Winslow Arizona"

Duncan Cheslett

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #131 on: June 16, 2019, 02:20:54 AM »
Mike,


From your story clubhouse fires don't seem to be as profitable in the US as they have been over the years for many clubs in the UK!


 ;)



Thomas Dai

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #132 on: June 16, 2019, 05:20:42 AM »
Regrettably Clubhouses catching fire have, amongst many other unpleasant aspects, caused the loss of much golfing memorabilia and historical etc records. A great shame.
A good reason for Clubs to photograph as much of their records etc as they can which of course is a lot easier these days with digital cameras etc and storage on memory sticks and Clouds and the likes.
Atb

BCrosby

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #133 on: June 16, 2019, 10:17:59 AM »
Great post Tim. You nailed it. My kids are your age; you capture their thinking quite well.


You are also right that there is no going back. In a couple of decades most golf clubs will be different animals or they will have ceased to exist.


Bob 
« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 10:19:57 AM by BCrosby »

Mike_Young

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #134 on: June 16, 2019, 11:03:13 AM »
Regrettably Clubhouses catching fire have, amongst many other unpleasant aspects, caused the loss of much golfing memorabilia and historical etc records. A great shame.
A good reason for Clubs to photograph as much of their records etc as they can which of course is a lot easier these days with digital cameras etc and storage on memory sticks and Clouds and the likes.
Atb


BUT . many clubhouse fires have saved clubs also...so don't forget that....
"just standing on a corner in Winslow Arizona"

corey miller

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #135 on: June 16, 2019, 11:07:32 AM »



Mike Bodo


isn't the real "tell" here what the decision making process would have been for you had your original club not had a fire?  At 55 your dues would have doubled?

Mike Bodo

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #136 on: June 17, 2019, 01:47:42 AM »



Mike Bodo


isn't the real "tell" here what the decision making process would have been for you had your original club not had a fire?  At 55 your dues would have doubled?
I actually had every intention of re-upping and becoming a Class A member had the clubhouse not burned down, despite the 12% increase in monthly dues and having to pay 100% of any assessment amount. It was still worth it to me, as I loved the membership and all the amenities and history that came with our original clubhouse. It no longer was a good enough deal for me to remain at the club and pay more only to get less in return. It was a very difficult decision to arrive at given everything I had invested in the club financially and emotionally, but in hindsight I'm glad I made the move, as I have a great new home club and the reduced financial obligation has freed me up to play a lot more courses outside of my home club, which I am grateful for.
"90% of all putts left short are missed." - Yogi Berra

Jeff Schley

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #137 on: June 18, 2019, 10:41:17 AM »



Mike Bodo


isn't the real "tell" here what the decision making process would have been for you had your original club not had a fire?  At 55 your dues would have doubled?
I actually had every intention of re-upping and becoming a Class A member had the clubhouse not burned down, despite the 12% increase in monthly dues and having to pay 100% of any assessment amount. It was still worth it to me, as I loved the membership and all the amenities and history that came with our original clubhouse. It no longer was a good enough deal for me to remain at the club and pay more only to get less in return. It was a very difficult decision to arrive at given everything I had invested in the club financially and emotionally, but in hindsight I'm glad I made the move, as I have a great new home club and the reduced financial obligation has freed me up to play a lot more courses outside of my home club, which I am grateful for.
Mike wonderful perspective on making the most of every situation, you sound like a guy who makes any club better because of your positive attitude. Happiness most of the time is a choice.
"To give anything less than your best, is to sacrifice your gifts."
- Steve Prefontaine

Wayne_Kozun

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #138 on: June 18, 2019, 01:56:43 PM »
Travel teams kill the Country Club!


Agree 100%
Not so much in Canada as the travel teams are in hockey and the hockey and golf seasons don't overlap very much.

V_Halyard

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #139 on: June 23, 2019, 02:20:28 PM »
Also, 120+ posts in this thread on "private golf at a crossroads" without a mention of women golfers, millennial or otherwise.

My wife does Qualitative Research for BIG American brands, and it is very rare that those brands care about anything other than "Head of Household" research. That is code for women, and it is they who make the decisions. My personal view is there are:
  • Country Clubs with golf
  • Private Golf Clubs
  • Every other type of golf that pulls people away from the above
If I ran a Country Club, I would really only care what the woman wanted...
Why would you care about golf's largest potential growth demographic?  ;)

"It's a tiny little ball that doesn't even move... how hard could it be?"  I will walk and carry 'til I can't... or look (really) stupid.

V_Halyard

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #140 on: June 23, 2019, 03:08:54 PM »
Enjoying catching up on this excellently complex private club thread. I am reminded of a (theoretical) project that chose to sell $Millions of Real estate lots, then build $Multi-Million Clubhouse, then invest in $xxx,000 in a putting area,  then as a last step, spend money on a feasibility study to understand if the existing and obviously f****d up golf course was in need of un-f****ing. I bet many here can cut and paste this scenario.

Demographics and Geography seem to play a big part in each scenario. NYC is different than Wisconsin. I especially enjoyed learning how clubhouse fires serve as restoration and membership tools.  :)
I think Mike Young delivered an MVP Line:
"Private clubs are at a crossroads but the big issue is going to be clubhouses more than the courses when it comes to surviving..."

It also seems that there are two things that can accelerate the demise of a club:
1: Asset Mismanagement
2: Cultural Mismanagement.
"It's a tiny little ball that doesn't even move... how hard could it be?"  I will walk and carry 'til I can't... or look (really) stupid.

V_Halyard

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #141 on: June 23, 2019, 03:12:58 PM »
WHEW! Finally caught up. Some excellent comments and ideas discussed throughout this thread and great hearing from our Millennial contributors. I found many the talking points raised by SBusch relatable and spot-on. To add to what's already been shared and discussed, let me offer my own personal mico-case example to add to the mix.


Up until this year, I had been a member at a private SE Michigan club the past three years. I loved and still love the course, the historic clubhouse we had, the men's locker and grill, our gorgeous dining hall, swimming pool, staff, but most of all, the membership. Having caddied at two private clubs growing up - one of which being Oakland Hills - I saw first-hand how pretentious and high-falutin much of the membership at each was. Don't get me wrong, there were plenty of humble, generous, kind, funny and respectful members at both clubs, but there were enough of the former personality types to know that if I ever attained that type of wealth I probably wouldn't mix well with that group. Fast-forward 30 years and the club I eventually joined was closer in mindset and spirit to my college fraternity than it was the stuffy, elitist clubs I worked at as a kid. I felt right at home and my family and I enjoyed our time together there.


Regrettably and tragically, our iconic clubhouse (built in 1926) caught fire and burned down last June to the shock and dismay of everyone. While virtually everything inside the building was lost, we all pulled our boot-straps up and did our best to make the best of a difficult and unpleasant situation. Sadly, when it came time to renew my membership for 2019, I had a lot of tough decisions to make. For starters, I had no choice but to become a Class A member this year, which meant an increase in monthly dues in exchange for equity, whatever that really means in today's day and time. In addition, where I was previously assessed at 50% of the assessable amount, I would now pay 100%. To offset some of some of these costs I had hoped the club would reduce our annual fees seeing that a number of amenities we were paying for, i.e. private locker, sauna/showers, men's grill, patio, etc. were lost in the fire. While the club rented temporary lockers following the fire, which they placed in a separate building unaffected by it, you couldn't keep anything in them overnight, thus it was a poor substitute to having a personal private locker. In short, the club was losing it's cost-to-value proposition, as I would now be paying much more than I previously had in return for less in the form of amenities and services.

What sealed the deal for me leaving this club was the season walking pass offered by Washtenaw Golf Club (aka Washtenaw Country Club) a once private now daily fee course which was 15 min. closer to my home and every bit as good, if not arguably a better course than my private club. For less than $2k I receive unlimited golf, unlimited use of the driving range/practice facilities and a full-size private locker - including use of the locker room facilities. Having formerly been a private club, Washtenaw had all the amenities of my private club minus the swimming pool (which they shuttered two years ago) and tennis courts, which our club allowed to fall into disrepair and become an eye-sore. Do the math, I was paying over $12k annually at a second-tier private (including food/beverage) and would now pay a fraction of that at my new club, even with food and beverage thrown in. In addition, I could carry my bag or walk with a trolley whenever I wanted, which I couldn't do at our private club until after 3 PM. It was either get charged to use a cart or caddie if you were teeing off prior to that.

Having gone the daily fee route last year boosted Washtenaw's revenues. So much so that the owner who was operating it and the Polo Fields of Ann Arbor (a private golf club), sold the latter late last summer, which should tell you something. There are a lot of Millennials I see on the course at Washtenaw - especially on the weekends. That generation is very visible and well-represented, which bodes well for the game. In fact, at 54, I feel like one of the old guys now whereas at my former private club I was the median age. The one thing I don't receive with my pass (they refer to it as a membership) is preferred tee times, which isn't that big of a deal to me. Whether the club is making money or not is another question, but given how many weddings, banquets and events it hosts throughout the week and weekends, I have to believe they're doing okay.

After Washtenaw's clubhouse burnt down in 1981, the membership at the time had to borrow money to the tune of $1,000,000.00 to finish construction of its new clubhouse. Unfortunately, they could not pay the debt note off when it came due and when the great recession hit they ended up being sold to the Polo Fields group, where they continued operating as a private club for several years prior to going the semi-private and ultimately daily fee route. That said, a lot of former members still play there and, like me, are annual season pass holders.

I've heard through the grapevine that my former private club will have to borrow money to complete construction of its new clubhouse, which they haven't even begun building. In the meantime, revenues there are decreasing mainly due to attrition in the membership ranks (social and golfing), which as a byproduct affects golfing rounds, food/beverage purchases, pro shop purchases, etc. while expenses remain high as a result of the clubs decision to erect, maintain and operate a temporary clubhouse/dining room, kitchen and bathrooms. I suspect some of you can guess how this story will end, as in many ways it mirror's Washtenaw. However, I bring this up because it is an interesting contrast and case study of two diametrically opposed business models. Without seeing financial statements from either entity it's hard to know which is working and which isn't. All I know is that as a consumer, I prefer Washtenaw's model given the attractive cost-to-value proposition. In fact, other once private and semi-private clubs in my area such as Radrick Farms (Dye) and University of Michigan (MacKenzie) have adopted this same business model and now offer season golfing passes to the public at a greatly reduced rate to what a private membership would cost.

I'd be curious to hear of other once former private clubs having gone this route and to what degrees of success or failure they are having? In many respects, the creation of the annual golf pass mirrors that adopted by the ski industry years ago. Nearly every ski resort and operator in the U.S. offers some type of discounted annual pass. You'd be hard-pressed to find one that doesn't. A lot of these operators also belong to national/international ski pass networks, such as Epic (Vail Resorts), Ikon and Mountain Collective giving access to these resorts and destinations to non-locals. Perhaps we'll see a similar multi-pronged business and marketing approach adopted by private, semi-private and daily fee golf clubs whereby consumers have access to them on a local level, in addition to regionally, nationally and internationally via a mix of membership networks and holding companies (Club Corp.)? All I know is that nothing remains static forever and I suspect we're in the early phases of a major transformation taking place in the golf industry, which hopefully brings with it more affordability, accessibility and flexibility. Only time will tell.
Interesting thoughts. The ski model is interesting but is driven by a consolidation of big dogs and Crown Jewels. The difference is that we would not be able to buy an EPIC pass to play unlimited rounds at Pebble, NGLA , etc but would be interesting to own a Kemper/Keiser Pass. (Remember where you saw this idea) lol
Dormie Network will be interesting to watch although the collection of courses will appeal to individual tastes.
"It's a tiny little ball that doesn't even move... how hard could it be?"  I will walk and carry 'til I can't... or look (really) stupid.

V_Halyard

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #142 on: June 23, 2019, 03:37:23 PM »
The article at the link below ties in nicely with the subject being discussed in a separate topic regarding golf membership networks and their potential impact on both how and where the game is played.
https://www.city-journal.org/country-clubs


The comment section of the actual article is insightful.
"It's a tiny little ball that doesn't even move... how hard could it be?"  I will walk and carry 'til I can't... or look (really) stupid.

Mike Sweeney

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #143 on: June 23, 2019, 09:10:49 PM »

The comment section of the actual article is insightful.


Just had a long car ride, so I took a look.


This makes me appreciate what Ran had created. Sure there are few rules here, but most of us post with our real names. I genuinely appreciate that.
"One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we’ve been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us."

Dr. Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

Chris Hughes

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #144 on: November 02, 2023, 08:11:52 AM »
Chicago has a huge concentration of golf courses - both private and public.


Most private courses are nervous, but also in denial. Clubs that had 300 full members in 2005 now have 250.
They hire "consultants" who all deliver pages out of the same playbook to desperate committees seeking the "silver bullet" to pitch to their memberships.


"Spend, spend, spend" is the matra. Add a gym, a daycare, a candy store, "grab n go" food", new dress codes, casual this, relaxed that...


Most clubs have boards of "big company guys" who love hiring consultants to solve their problems. When, in reality, most clubs are like $5-7M small businesses that should be nimble and flexible.


Not once do these clubs look at demographic trends and discuss reducing overhead to adjust to the changing landscape and the new realities.


What they usually miss:


1. Clubs with the best golf courses do not have membership issues.
2. Clubs that invest silly sums of money in their clubhouses to chase the new "millennial member" are setting themselves up for disappointment. "Build it and they will come" never works. "Hope is not a strategy."


3. Why would the "new Millennial" pay a huge country club downstroke and monthly dues just to eat dinner and splash in a pool? Plus, there are clubs that do that already. In Chicago, the Saddle and Cycle Club kicks ass at just that, for half the price of "country club dues".


The bifurcation will continue and the list of casualties and "body bags" is sure to grow.
The US created a monster and now has to pay for it.


"There will be blood."


Very astute analysis & commentary. 🫵

Kalen Braley

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #145 on: November 02, 2023, 11:29:37 AM »
Chicago has a huge concentration of golf courses - both private and public.


Most private courses are nervous, but also in denial. Clubs that had 300 full members in 2005 now have 250.
They hire "consultants" who all deliver pages out of the same playbook to desperate committees seeking the "silver bullet" to pitch to their memberships.


"Spend, spend, spend" is the matra. Add a gym, a daycare, a candy store, "grab n go" food", new dress codes, casual this, relaxed that...


Most clubs have boards of "big company guys" who love hiring consultants to solve their problems. When, in reality, most clubs are like $5-7M small businesses that should be nimble and flexible.


Not once do these clubs look at demographic trends and discuss reducing overhead to adjust to the changing landscape and the nw realities.

What they usually miss:

1. Clubs with the best golf courses do not have membership issues.
2. Clubs that invest silly sums of money in their clubhouses to chase the new "millennial member" are setting themselves up for disappointment. "Build it and they will come" never works. "Hope is not a strategy."

3. Why would the "new Millennial" pay a huge country club downstroke and monthly dues just to eat dinner and splash in a pool? Plus, there are clubs that do that already. In Chicago, the Saddle and Cycle Club kicks ass at just that, for half the price of "country club dues".

The bifurcation will continue and the list of casualties and "body bags" is sure to grow.
The US created a monster and now has to pay for it.

"There will be blood."

Very astute analysis & commentary. 🫵


Chris,

4.5 years later and post-pandemic, I wonder if this is still true?  I'd bet most of the "struggling" clubs Ian referenced are back to full health and perhaps even have a wait list.

P.S.  Love the "There will be blood" reference, one of my all time fave movies!

Rob Marshall

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #146 on: November 02, 2023, 11:44:43 AM »
Private clubs have never been healthier

If life gives you limes, make margaritas.” Jimmy Buffett

Brian Finn

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #147 on: November 02, 2023, 12:20:59 PM »
Private clubs have never been healthier
This seems to be almost universally true.  What do the best run clubs do (or not do) now to ensure they remain healthy for years to come? 
New for 2023:  Cheraw SP, Grandfather, Clyne, Tenby, Pennard, Langland Bay, Southerndown, Pyle & Kenfig, Royal Porthcawl, Ashburnham, Rolls of Monmouth, Old Barnwell...

Tim Martin

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #148 on: November 02, 2023, 01:14:21 PM »
Private clubs have never been healthier
This seems to be almost universally true.  What do the best run clubs do (or not do) now to ensure they remain healthy for years to come?


Effectively manage debt in a high interest rate environment.

Daryl David

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Private Clubs at a Crossroads
« Reply #149 on: November 02, 2023, 11:42:28 PM »
Private clubs have never been healthier
This seems to be almost universally true.  What do the best run clubs do (or not do) now to ensure they remain healthy for years to come?


Effectively manage debt in a high interest rate environment.


Hopefully they were able to retire the debt during the recent boom years. I would be very concerned if a club I belonged to was taking on debt right now.   :(

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