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Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2018, 11:26:29 PM »
The May 1911 edition of American Golfer noted Ross' ongoing work at Essex County, as well as his recent trip to the UK and an increased focus on design work.




A Nov. 1911 American Golfer advertisement noting the dual professional role Ross maintained.  A little while back I read an article discussing the small fortunes a few pros were making that noted one professional had amassed over a million dollars from his teaching, club sales and course designs.  I don't believe the pro was named, but it would be hard to believe they were referring to anyone but Ross.  If I can find it, I'll post it here.

« Last Edit: February 25, 2018, 10:45:40 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2018, 11:07:54 AM »
1912

Brae Burn Country Club (West Newton, MA) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1912, 2 Holes, Remodel in 1927, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - 1927 2 Hole Remodel date changed to 1928

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 27 Holes.

I don't have anything that definitively links Ross to Brae Burn in 1912, but the timing matches up.

May 1913 American Golfer -




As for the later work, the 1926 article below details changes suggested by Ross in anticipation of the upcoming US Amateur.  Looking at the 1928 Plan of the Course, you can infer that some of the changes were made.

Nov. 20, 1926 Boston Globe -





Plan of the Course, Aug. 26, 1928 Brooklyn Daily Eagle -



Update:  Adding in this April 14, 1928 Boston Globe article which notes changes were made pursuant to the plans of Ross to 8 holes.






White Bear Yacht Club (White Bear Lake, MN) - 9 Holes, New in 1912, 9 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - 9 Holes New in 1912 and in 1917, 9 Holes Remodel in 1912 and 1914

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

I'm going to leave the discussion on this one alone for now.  There has been plenty of supposition as to whether White Bear is a Ross, a William Watson, a Vardon or some combination thereof.  Whatever the case, there's enough information out there to suggest the listing isn't entirely accurate.

Edit:  Adding in the best description of what happened at White Bear I've found to date.  The article is from 1925, and was written by a Teugega member who was on a rail tour of western states and golf courses that was put on by Golfers Magazine.  Although certainly non-contemporaneous, the description of original plans being done by Watson with Ross and Vardon offering advice seems to fit all of the evidence we've gathered to date.

Aug. 1925 Rome Sentinel -



Second Edit:  See the Sept. 1, 1916 Minnesota Tribune article on Minikahda in the 1917 listing noting Ross was to visit the course with a view for rearranging the layout.

An undated Map of the Golf Links -




Fairview Country Club (Elmsford, NY) - 18 Holes, New in 1912, NLE in 1968

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

I'm not so sure on the timing for this one.  Around 1908 the club moved from Tuckahoe to Elmsford, with George Low being given credit for laying out an 18 hole course.

May 1908 Golfers' Magazine -



Ross does show up around 1918 to remodel the course.

March 23, 1919 New York Tribune -




North Fork Country Club (Cuthogue, NY) - 9 Holes, New in 1912, 9 Holes, New in 1922?, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

In addition to the 1912 article below, there is a 1937 article discussing Ross doing the first 9 with Emmet coming in later to add 9 additional holes.


July 1, 1912 Brooklyn Times Union -





Aug. 5, 1937 The Watchman -




Pinehurst Country Club #4 (Pinehurst, NC) - 18 Holes, New in 1912-1937, NLE in 1938

2018 DRS Update - Date changed to 1910-1937

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 72 Holes.

Another addition to the Pinehurst collection. Clearing work for the 4th course started in 1910, with the first 6 holes opening in 1912.  The full 18 would open some time before 1919.

Dec. 9, 1911 Pinehurst Outlook -



Dec. 1912 Golf Magazine -








Memphis Country Club (Memphis, TN) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1912, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Date changed to 1910-12

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

The only reports of work on the course from 1912 involve the addition of 60 bunkers with no architect being named.  The 1916 Annual Guide listing for Memphis CC contains a notation that the course was being remodeled by Donald Ross.  It is possible this work started as early as 1912, but it is more likely that the 1916 date is a bit more accurate.

Update:  As the Feb. 1920 American Golfer article below notes, Ross worked here after the Western Open, which was held in 1913.

See also the Jan. 8, 1916 Pinehurst Outlook article in post #47 below noting Ross doing a new course in Memphis.

Feb. 1920 American Golfer -





July 1920 Golfers Magazine -




Additions:


Tedesco Country Club (Marblehead, MA)

2018 DRS Update - Now just reads 18 Holes New in 1912

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

The DRS lists Ross as being responsible for 18 new holes with a date of 1937.  Ross was here in 1911/12 reworking the existing 9 hole course and adding 9 new ones.  In addition to the 1937 date, Brad Tufts has informed me that the club has Ross' notes made in 1931 on suggestions for the course, several of which were carried out.

Feb. 1912 American Golfer -



July 8, 1912 Christian Science Monitor -




Wyckoff Country Club (o/k/a Mount Tom GC) (Holyoke, MA)

2018 DRS Update - Now reads 18 Holes New in 1912

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

The listing has this as a new 18 hole course in 1923. It fails to mention his activities in 1912 and 1914.  In addition to designing and remodeling the new course, Ross served as Chairman of the Green Committee here.

Jan. 1912 American Golfer -



Jan. 1914 American Golfer -



Dec. 1914 American Golfer -

« Last Edit: June 22, 2019, 08:09:53 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2018, 10:41:57 AM »
A 1913 image of Ross' swing -



If you look back at the first decade or so of Ross' career, you can lump the projects into two different categories. 

(a)  Courses where he was engaged essentially full time - Oakley, Pinehurst, Essex County; and

(b)  Courses where he had more of a traditional architect's role.

You can pretty much track the various connections that lead Ross to the projects in group (b).  Southern Pines and Overhills are obvious, as is all of the Massachusetts work.  Just about everything else came about from the clients' familiarity with Ross himself and the work he was doing at Pinehurst.  Lurking in the background of all of this is Walter Travis.  Although I don't have anything concrete describing any promotion Travis might have put forth for his friend, Travis would later write about his appreciation for the style of work Ross was putting forth.  It isn't hard to imagine Travis not only encouraging Ross to pursue his design career, but also encouraging clients like Walter Harban to utilize Ross' talents.

By 1913, even with a body of work that would only represent a good year for the likes of Tom Bendelow or Alex Findlay, Ross was considered one of the pre-eminent course designers in the country.

The following two articles ran in early 1913, the first being the original piece and the second being one of a number of reprints that ran in other papers.  Both are included to note the subtle change in the lead in, with Ross now being considered "long a National authority on golf course architecture and construction."

Feb. 8, 1913 Pinehurst Outlook -



Feb. 16, 1913 Wilmington Morning Star -



The titles of these two articles is also of note.  A new era of golf course design had been ushered in with the opening of NGLA, and clubs throughout the country were no longer satisfied with an adequate playing field.  Courses needed to be "ideal."

The era after NGLA marked the second great boom in American golf course construction.  In the 15 or so years since golf had become part of our vernacular, the game itself had changed dramatically.  New equipment and balls made many of the older courses outdated.  More interest and money made the projects larger.  Simple courses built on available land with functional hazards were no longer acceptable.  Courses now had to be scientific, with sites selected because they offered land fit for the game, and if it wasn't there was plenty of money and man-power available to make it so.  Courses were no longer being built in locations determined by their proximity to the nearest train depot, the automobile now made it possible to build in locations that would have been unreachable mere years prior.

It isn't any coincidence that many of the greats we think of today saw their design practices take off in the early teens.  There was plenty of work to go around, and with a brief hiccup for World War I, that work would continue right up until the great depression.

Donald Ross was perfectly posed to make the most of the opportunity.  With bases in New England and North Carolina, he could cover a large territory, and with Pinehurst the great names in golf had been coming to him for nearly a decade.  Whether he was or wasn't America's authority on design at this point, the mantle stuck and was repeated not only in the papers, but by Ross himself.

April 27, 1913 Pittsburgh Press -



May 1913 American Golfer -


« Last Edit: February 27, 2018, 01:04:21 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2018, 12:03:48 PM »
Tucked within those early 1913 articles above are a number of projects Ross had underway.  They include:

Old Elm
The Balsams
Shennecossett
Rhode Island CC - noted in the 1911 list above
Kansas City - new course
Glen Falls, NY - new course
Charlotte - new course
Rochester, NY - remodel
Glen View CC - remodel
Winchester CC - remodel
Cohasset CC - remodel
Tedesco CC - remodel, noted in the 1912 list above
Tatnuck CC - remodel
Essex County - continuing work
Pinehurst - continuing work

This list contains an interesting snapshot of the development of Ross' career.  The number of New England courses is of no surprise, but we start to see him branch out to more remote locations with upstate New York, Kansas City and Chicago.

1913 marks a bit of a benchmark, as his momentum would lead to the creation of a more formalized design business and the addition of his crew of associates in the years to come. 


« Last Edit: February 04, 2018, 03:01:41 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Cal Seifert

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2018, 12:45:51 PM »
I believe North Fork was declared the only Ross course on Long Island.  Pretty amazing he didn't do more work there.

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #30 on: February 04, 2018, 01:28:57 PM »
1913

East Lake Golf Club #1 (Atlanta, GA) - 18 Holes, New and Remodel in 1913, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 36 Holes.

The Tom Bendelow designed East Lake opened in 1906, and became one of the first courses to be "softened" after its initial design.  George Adair would bring in a slew of experts over the subsequent years to offer their advice on the project, including H. H. Barker, Findlay, Travis and a number of professional players.  Ross didn't arrive on the scene until 1913, and was responsible for designing a system of traps.  He probably had a hand in the rearrangement of the course from the original design as well, but so did a few other folks.

July 1913 American Golfer -



Sept. 1914 American Golfer -




Hinsdale Golf Club (Clarendon Hills, IL) - 18 Holes, New in 1913, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Hinsdale is another mystery.  The club built a new course on adjoining land around 1908.  From 1914 - 1916 extensive changes were made.  But there is no mention of a new course around 1913, nor any Donald Ross involvement. 


Old Elm Club (Highland Park, IL) - 18 Holes, New in 1913, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Changed to 18 Holes Remodel in 1913

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

Whether this was purely a Colt design with Ross doing the construction or more of a collaboration remains subject to debate.  Suffice it to say that the thought that Ross was the untested rookie in the equation doesn't hold water.  There is no doubt Colt was the senior statesman, but Ross was already a known commodity.  It is interesting to note in Darwin's article below that he pays no heed to the resident American architect, despite the fact that Ross had been engaged on the project longer than Colt.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 below.

Sept. 28, 1913 Chicago Tribune -



May 24, 1914 Chicago Tribune -



May 1913 Golfers Magazine course plan -




Poland Spring Golf Course (Poland Spring, ME) - 9 Holes, New in 1913, 9 Holes, Remodel in 1913, Still in Existence

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Poland Spring did have an 18 hole course by 1916, but I can find no record of any Ross involvement.  Travis and Fenn made a number of improvements around 1916, including building 6 new greens.  If this was a Ross in 1913, it is hard to understand why this work would have taken place.


Island Country Club (Martha's Vineyard, MA) - 18 Holes, New in 1913, NLE?

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Another one I'd like to see some confirmation on.  Timing and location make sense.


Tatnuck Country Club (Worcester, MA) - 9 Holes, Remodel in 1913, Still in Existence

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Ross work noted in the Feb. 9 and Feb. 13, 1916 articles posted above.


Wianno Golf Club (Osterville, MA) - 9 Holes, Remodel in 1913, 9 Holes, New in 1920, Still in Existence

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

I have yet to find any confirming information on Wianno.


Echo Lake Country Club (Westfield, NJ) - 18 Holes, New in 1913, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Other sources credit the original course, which was known as Cranford GC and for a while was called Union County CC, to George Low.  The club did bring Ross in to do the bunkers, but I have no other evidence of his involvement or if this work was completed.  There is a Ross course plan, but there is no date and I can't make out a date on it.

Oct. 14, 1914 New York Times -



Ross Plan -




CC of Rochester (Rochester, NY) - 18 Holes, New in 1913, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes Remodelled.

Ross work noted in the Feb. 9 and Feb. 13, 1916 articles posted above.

July 6, 1913 Cincinnati Enquirer -




Wanango Golf Club (Reno, PA) - 9 Holes, New in 1913, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Date changed to 1912

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Although it was reported in April of 1913 (see the April 27, 1913 article above) that Ross was to visit Oil City to lay out a course, Wanango is not a Ross.




Additions:

Druid Hills GC (Atlanta, Ga)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

See the July 1913 American Golfer above under East Lake.


Glen View Club (Golf, IL)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

See the Feb. 8 and Feb. 18, 1913 articles above.  Ross and Colt, during part of the time they were in Chicago together working on Old Elm, stopped by Glen View to offer up advice.  The timing of the earlier 1913 articles suggests that Ross may have had additional input prior to Colt showing up.

March 1914 American Golfer -





Cohasset GC (Quincy, MA)

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

2018 DRS Update - Changed to 9 Holes New in 1909 and 9 Holes New in 1913

Ross would return in the '20's to rework the course, but he was here in 1913 remodeling the existing layout (see the Feb. 8 and 18, 1913 article above).


Charlotte CC (o/k/a Mecklenburg CC)

2018 DRS Update - Changed to 9 Holes New and 9 Holes Remodel in 1913-15 and 2 Holes Remodel in 1945

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

In addition to the notation in the Feb. 8 and Feb. 18, 1913 articles, Ross' work here in 1913 was heavily covered.  The DRS listing notes his later remodeling work in 1925 and 1942, but does not cover his remodeling of the existing 9 hole course and the addition of 9 new holes.

Jan. 28, 1913 Evening Chronicle -



June 18, 1913 Evening Chronicle



Sept. 12, 1913 The Evening Chronicle -



Oct. 26, 1916 Charlotte Observer -




Glens Falls CC (Glens Falls, NY)

2018 DRS Update - Changed to 9 Holes New in 1912 and 9 Holes New in 1921

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

The listing notes a new 18 hole course in 1923.  From the Feb. 8 and 16, 1913 articles posted above, it is evident he laid out a new course here around 1913.  A Sept. 27, 1924 Burlington Free Press article notes this as a course that had been laid out previously by Donald Ross and Walter Hatch.  If they did work together here in 1913, this is the first mention I've seen of Hatch's involvement.

The idea of the expansion of the course to 18 holes started as early as 1917, with Ross having mapped out the additional 9.  This work wouldn't take place until 1921 as covered later in the thread.

June 30, 1917 The Post-Star -



Dec. 31, 1917 The Post-Star -




Wanakah CC (Buffalo, NY)

2018 DRS Listing - Added to the Listing with 9 Holes New and 9 Holes Remodel in 1913

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

May 29, 1913 The Buffalo Commercial -



May 29, 1913 Buffalo Enquirer -



June 29, 1913 Buffalo Courier -



See also the July 6, 1913 Cincinnati Enquirer article above.


Westmoreland CC (Pittsburgh, PA)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

May 1913 American Golfer noted the addition of 9 holes on newly acquired land.  See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 below.

April 27, 1913 Pittsburgh Press -

« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 01:59:57 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #31 on: February 04, 2018, 01:29:30 PM »
I believe North Fork was declared the only Ross course on Long Island.  Pretty amazing he didn't do more work there.


That declaration would be wrong.
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Cal Seifert

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #32 on: February 04, 2018, 02:25:04 PM »
I believe North Fork was declared the only Ross course on Long Island.  Pretty amazing he didn't do more work there.


That declaration would be wrong.


What courses there are Ross?

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #33 on: February 04, 2018, 02:33:35 PM »
Cal:


This is a chronology.  We're not there yet and I'm trying to keep all of these posts on point.


In the meantime, you can check out Chris Buie's article covering Ross in New York - https://www.nysga.org/communications-news/ross-in-new-york


Sven
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Bret Lawrence

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #34 on: February 04, 2018, 03:25:21 PM »
Sven,


Hinsdale-
I have an article from The New York Times dated March 23, 1924 titled "Ross Creator of 10 Courses to Stage Major Events".
The article starts:  "By a curious coincidence, at least ten of the courses on which major golf championships will be played this year are creations of the same architect, Donald Ross, superintendent of the Pinehurst Country Club. Ross designed all five of the Pinehurst courses, on two of which the three North and South tournaments will be held."


The other courses listed include:
Oakland Hills Golf Club-US Open
Worcester CC and Oak Park CC-Sectional qualifiers for the US Open
Rhode Island CC-US Women's Open
French Lick-PGA Championship
Calumet-Western Open
Hinsdale CC-Western Amateur


I realize this article is from a few years later, but it seems to suggest Ross did some work at Hinsdale.


Bret


Tom Bagley

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2018, 01:30:16 PM »
Sven:
Really great thread.

Tucked into the aforementioned 1913 articles is a mention by Ross of perhaps working on both Worcester Country Club and Tatnuck Country Club, Worcester.  His wording is a bit odd, but he references "Country Club, Tatnuck Country Club at Worcester, Mass."  Based on his earlier reference for "Country Club, Cohassett, Mass," it seems to me that Ross is implying that "Country Club" AND "Tatnuck Country Club" are two different courses. 

The mention of Worcester CC in that time-frame would make sense, based on my understanding as to when the course opened.

Thanks again for the clarification on much of the DRS data.  Their information is 100% inaccurate regarding my home course Oak Hill CC, Fitchburg, but my past attempts to correct the record have been unsuccessful.  The correct information is that Ross added 9 holes in 1927 (construction 1925-26, opened for play 1927) and remodeled the original 9 in 1928, opening for play in 1929. 

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #36 on: February 05, 2018, 04:58:47 PM »
1914

Hartford Golf Club (Hartford, CT) - 14 Holes, Remodel in 1914, 14 Holes, New in 1946, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Now 18 Holes New in 1914, 4, Holes New in 1946, 14 Holes Remodel in 1946

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

The course was reworked in 1914, but it was a few years later when the newspapers note Ross being involved in adding 9 new holes to the course.  Ross would return here in 1946 to add 14 new holes and remodel the course.

Jan. 1914 American Golfer -



May 1914 Golf Magazine -





Feb. 14, 1917 Hartford Courant -





1946 Ross/McGovern Plan -




Shennecossett Municipal GC (o/k/a Shennecossett GC) (Groton, CT) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, 3 Holes, Remodel in 1916-19, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

July 11, 1914 The Day -




July 19, 1914 The Sun -



Oct. 1915 Golf Magazine -



1919 Course Rendering -



Undated Course Plan -




Exmoor Country Club (Highland Park, IL) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1914, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Now 9 Holes New in 1914, 9 Holes Remodel in 1914

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes Remodeled.

Exmoor has been covered before around here - http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,61011.msg1449242.html#msg1449242


I don't have much to add to what you can find in that thread, other than to note that the course gets described as a "Ross" by quite a few folks around here.  As Dan Moore noted in that thread, there was much more to the story.

See also the Jan. 9, 1916 Pinehurst Outlook article in post #47 below.


Indian Hill Club (Winnetka, IL) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1914?, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - The "?" was removed

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes Remodeled.

There are varying accounts as to who exactly laid out the course in 1912.  Colt was certainly involved, and differing reports have either Barker or Ross also playing a role.  Ross would revisit the course prior to its opening to rework the original design.

Nov. 14, 1912 Lake Shore News -




Dec. 1913 American Golfer -



April 1914 American Golfer -



May 2, 1915 Chicago Tribune -



Dec. 18, 1918 Chicago Tribune




Oak Park Country Club (Oak Park, IL) - 18 Holes, New in 1914-16, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Added in 18 Hole Remodel in 1921

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Ross was engaged to lay out the new course in 1914.  He would return here in 1921 to inspect the course.

Jan. 1915 Golfers Magazine -









Bass River Golf Course (South Yarmouth, MA) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Bass River is another mystery.  The course supposedly got its start in 1900, but the first listing I can find for it is on the 1915 Hodgeman's Map of New England golf courses.  It is noted in the 1916 Annual Guide which doesn't list any details, and the next appearance in the guides is in 1922 where it is noted as having 9 holes.  It wouldn't be until the 1925 Annual Guide that the listing notes 18 holes.


Kernwood Country Club (Salem, MA) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

First 9 holes in 1914 and second 9 opened in 1918.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 below.

May 1915 American Golfer -







March 5, 1918 The Evening World -



Aug. 27, 1920 Boston Post -




Worcester Country Club (Worcester, MA) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

April 1914 American Golfer -




Nov. 1914 American Golfer -







June 1925 Golf Illustrated -






Detroit Golf Club - North (Detroit, MI) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, 18 Holes, Remodel in 1936, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Remodel date changed to 1926

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 36 holes.

Even though the plan for the two courses copied below is dated 1916, from the account below, it would appear that preliminary plans were drawn up in 1914, which would be interesting to see.  Ross returned here in 1926 to rework a number of holes, as evidenced by his notes.

1915 Spalding Official Golf Guide - 




Dec. 1919 American Golfer -



1916 Ross Plan -




Detroit Golf Club - South (Detroit, MI) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, 18 Holes, Remodel in 1934, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 36 holes.

See the North course info above.


Maplewood Country Club (Bethlehem, NH) - 9 Holes, New in 1914, 9 Holes, Remodel in 1914, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Remodel date changed to "1914 & 1928"

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Although Maplewood started as a 9 hole course, it had 18 holes by 1907.  There was a flurry of activity here in 1910 with Alex Smith, Willie Maguire, Alex Findlay and George Merritt contributing, and the course was lengthened in 1911.  But I can find no mention of Ross doing any work here, and the notation of 9 new holes doesn't jive with the already existing 18.


Knickerbocker Country Club (Tenably, NJ) - 9 Holes, New in 1914, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 holes.

April 1915 Golf Magazine -




Dec. 19, 1915 New York Tribune -




Siwanoy Country Club (Bronxville, NY) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

March 28, 1914 Rye Chronicle -



Feb. 20, 1915 Evening Telegram -





Columbus Country Club (Columbus, OH) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, Remodel in 1914, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Now reads 18 Holes, New in 1915, 18 Holes, Remodel in 1935-40

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

The Walnut Creek course for the Columbus Country club was built by Tom Bendelow in 1915.  Ross may have come in later to rework the course (some sources attribute his work to 1920) but he was not here in 1914.  I have not found anything that confirms his subsequent activity.


Flourtown Country Club (o/k/a Sunnybrook CC) (Flourtown, PA) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

March 1914 American Golfer -




July 24, 1915 Evening Public Ledger -




Philadelphia Cricket Club - Flourtown (Philadelphia, PA) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1914, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Seeing as the Flourtown course of the Philadlephia Cricket Club wasn't built until the early 1920's, this is either a mistaken reference to the work Ross did at the club's St. Martins course (see the 1914 Additions post below) or to Sunnybrook CC in Flourtown.


Wannamoisett Country Club (Rumford, RI) - 18 Holes, New in 1914, 18 Holes, Remodel in 1926, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

Ross first visited in 1909 to look over the ground for an 18 hole course.

Nov. 7, 1909 Boston Globe -



In 1914 Ross expanded the existing 9 hole course to 18 holes.




Jan. 1915 Golf Magazine -

« Last Edit: April 07, 2019, 05:44:41 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Colin Macqueen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #37 on: February 06, 2018, 04:38:45 AM »
Sven,


This is simply a labour of love and a wonderful piece of work it is too.
I am entranced by the early photographs and am astonished at how many women golfers and spectators figure in the images. And the hazards are whopping hazards!
I was amused by Ross's declaration upon returning from the prodigal son's visit/return to study British courses where he claims that visiting Americans would find " .... no rabble at Royal Dornoch"!


My how times have changed!  I've been there and what about that rabble rouser Rich Goodale eh?!


Great work by you,  Cheers Colin
"Golf, thou art a gentle sprite, I owe thee much"
The Hielander

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #38 on: February 06, 2018, 10:17:25 AM »
1914 (cont.)

Additions:

Midlothian CC (Midlothian, IL)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Ross was sent in to inspect the course prior to the US Open.  Although I haven't found anything that explicitly notes the changes were the result of his suggestions, its hard to imagine he didn't have some say.

April 30, 1914 Chicago Tribune -



May 10, 1914 Oregon Daily Journal -



Nov. 1915 Golfers Magazine -





CC of Detroit (Detroit, MI)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

CC of Detroit is a Colt design, but Ross did contribute.

July 1915 Golfers Magazine -












Aug. 22, 1915 Chicago Tribune -






Plainfield CC (f/k/a Hillside G&TC) (Plainfield, NJ)

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

June 27, 1914 Evening Post -





Raritan Valley CC (o/k/a Somerville CC) (Somerville, NJ)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Oct. 9, 1914 New Jersey Home News -




Westchester Hills GC (f/k/a Gedney Farms CC) (White Plains, NY)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

June 1915 Golf Magazine -





Allegheny CC (Pittsburgh, PA)

2018 DRS Update - Now reads 18 Holes, Remodel in 1911-1924

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes Remodeled.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 below.

Jan. 1914 American Golfer -



March 30, 1915 Boston Globe -



June 1915 American Golfer -




Philadelphia Cricket Club (St. Martins) (Philadelphia, PA)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Nov. 16, 1914 Evening Public Ledger -


« Last Edit: April 01, 2019, 02:24:07 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2018, 07:55:01 PM »
The Donald Ross Web Library (http://givenmemoriallibrary.net/vex/vex1/toc.htm) contains a wealth of information, included quite a few course maps and hole drawings. 


Unsurprisingly, there is less information available for Ross' early courses.  Of the courses covered so far in this thread (prior to 1914), only the following ones have a listing:


Oakley CC
Pinehurst #2
Southern Pines
Belmont
Jekyll Island
Overhills
Rhode Island CC
White Bear Yacht Club
Wyckoff (but only covering his later work)
East Lake
Old Elm
Poland Springs
Echo Lake
Charlotte (but only covering his later work)
Glens Falls (but only covering his later work)


By my count that is less than half of his output.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 12:37:08 AM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #40 on: February 07, 2018, 12:05:01 PM »
1914 was a benchmark year for Ross in the design business.  As noted in the article below, Ross had decided to forego his northern activity as a club professional (he would maintain that position at Pinehurst throughout the winter).  It was in 1914 that Ross would hire Eric Nelson as his Travel Secretary, Business Manager and Accountant.  Although it doesn't appear that he had much input into the actual design and construction of courses, Nelson remains today as the most unheralded member of the Ross team.

March 7, 1914 Eugene Guard -




Jan. 26, 1915 Brooklyn Times Union -





1914 also denotes a marked expansion in the scope of Ross' work.  Following on the success of Old Elm, Ross capitalized with a number of projects in Chicago and Detroit, locations that would remain strong outposts for his work throughout his career, and areas he would repeatedly return to for additional work and inspections of past projects.  With his New England work still taking off, he was also highly sought after in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.  Just about the only area he hadn't made significant inroads at this point was the South.

We also see the beginnings of the enterprise that would become Donald Ross & Associates.  He was just starting to work with Walter Hatch, and J. B. McGovern wasn't too far behind in joining the team.  Even before taking on "foremen," Ross' courses required the employment of hundreds of workers.  It is during this period that the formulation of the Ross work teams began as his network of field workers and those who could supervise them began to grow.

It is hard to quantify exactly how much time Ross spent on a given project.  Cases like Oakley, Pinehurst and Essex County are easy, as are more publicized courses like Old Elm and Overhills.  Quite a few of the courses listed above were more like consulting arrangements, where Ross was brought in to provide ideas of modernization (often new bunkering schemes) that would be implemented by the club itself.  With the amount of work that was building up in his portfolio by 1914, it isn't hard to imagine Ross telling a club he would have the time for a visit and to formulate a plan of improvement, but that he was stretched too thin for anything else.  It also isn't hard to imagine his desire to be in multiple places at once, a desire that fueled the plans to expand his business model.

I am struck by the seemingly meteoric rise to fame that took place between 1899 and 1914.  In his first years in America, he wouldn't have been viewed any differently than the hundreds of other club professionals plying their trade on these shores.  But in due course he was being lauded in the press as "the authority," "the preeminent expert" and "the famous golf course architect."  There were other highly sought after architects working at this time, including Barker, Bendelow, Findlay, the MacRaynor team and others, but Ross had seemingly attained the top of the list ranking, even becoming the go to guy for the USGA to call on to improve the courses that would host our national tournaments. 

It is hard to deny that there was a bit of luck involved with his success.  Having fallen into the Pinehurst job created a network of national connections that would be familiar with his work.  Being in the right place at the right time helped, but it would be hard to deny the impact seeing his work had on his future employers.  He wasn't hired at Essex County because of his name, he was hired because George Willet knew his work at Oakley.  That same story was repeated many times over.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2021, 04:30:46 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

BCowan

Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2018, 12:37:07 PM »
In regards to CC of Detroit, it opened in 1927 as new Alison course with new land.  Those Ross features I believe do NOT exist.  I believe Tony is out of town but this is his response from a prior thread regarding CCD.  Tony Gholz is a C&H expert. 


''I'm currently updating a list of C&A courses in North America that I've been working on for the past couple years.  I'm not ready for a gca post quite yet, but it's clear to me that the Alison course designed for the CCD in 1926 and opened in 1927 is a totally new course.  True, part of the Alison course is on property that included some of the area of Colt's course, that lying between the clubhouse (both former and current) and Provencal and between Kercheval and Chalfonte, the former Black Marsh Ditch.  The Alison course also includes all the area from the clubhouse to Moross Road that was not part of the club's property in 1913 thru 1925.   I recently overlaid the NY Sun layout for the 1915 AM (prior GCA post) with today's Google Earth and none of the hole corridors or green sites align, with the possible exception that the current practice green may be the site of the original Colt 18th green. Colt's holes 6 thru 13 were either in the area west of Black Marsh Ditch, today's Chalfonte, or crossed the ditch into the area of the houses now existing at the Chalfonte end of the course.  That's 8 holes from Colt gone.  The area between the clubhouse (today's ch and the "golf pavilion" in 1913") and Moross Road include all or parts of the current Alison holes 6 thru 12 and 14 and 15.  That's 9 holes on property that Colt didn't have to work with.  It appears that today's 1 thru 5, 13, and 16 thru 18 are actually on property that was part of both courses.  Again the best I can tell, there is no complete hole routing or green site from both courses that overlaps, only parts of certain fairways and those are from different playing angles. I am currently reading a "History of the CCD" manuscript (probably written c.1960) that I found at the USGA Library last week and interestingly to me it says that the "Colt & Allison (sic) plans approved by the BOD April 1926" noted that "plans for a nine-hole course inside the new 18-hole layout were also approvedů"  Tom would know, but could you put 9 holes in the area of the tennis course, polo field, and maintenance shed and woods?  Or maybe RTJ SR found the right solution.  Additionally, in partial answer to a question from a previous question as to why the CCD thru out a 6400 yard plus Colt course worthy of a National Championship for a new course by his partner:  the history I'm reading suggests that the Wayne County Road Commission was considering a road thru the course either in line with the Black marsh Ditch (Chalfonte) or, even worse, Charlevoix which would have cut thru the property where the tennis course are now.  So the club was also looking to ward off a potential future problem that did occur on the mid 20s.  At Port Huron Golf Club (see my IMO post) we lost two Alison holes to the St Clair County Road commission in 1950.  Not quite as bad as the CCD could have been.As I continue researching this interesting situation where Colt and Alison did separate courses for the same club at different times, I'll keep looking for clues of this Ross tidbit.  So far I've seen nothing except what Sven just posted.''Anthony





Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #42 on: February 07, 2018, 12:43:48 PM »
Before moving on to the 1915 listing, I wanted to post these three articles from that year as they each touch on aspects of the last post or earlier information from the thread.

First, a description of his activity in 1914 and 1915 and the expansive growth of his practice.  If the numbers in the article are accurate, we're still missing records of more than a few of those projects.

Feb. 14, 1915 Oregon Daily Journal -



Second, a project on Long Island that was to be built on a fairly large scale.  The New York papers would cover the evolution of the plan, including the proposal to purchase around 500 acres of land near Massapequa and form the Massapequa Golf Inc. Company.  Freeman was a Dyker Meadow guy (along with a few other metro area clubs) who spent time at Pinehurst, so it isn't hard to understand why Ross was his initial selection here.

At the very least, we know that Ross didn't have any hesitancy at this point in his career in working in an area that we commonly associate with Emmet, MacRaynor, Travis and others.  Perhaps it was this project that prompted the alluded to gentlemen's agreement on turf between Emmet and Ross.

April 14, 1915 The Courier-News -



By the end of 1915 Ross' count would be at 73 courses laid out and constructed.  (Just to compare, by early 1916 Bendelow was reported as having laid out over 600 courses).  I have a count of 95 through 1915, but a large number of those involved remodeling work, so it would appear that there are still a good number of courses that we have yet to identify.

Dec. 3, 1915 Washington Herald -

"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2018, 12:52:15 PM »
In regards to CC of Detroit, it opened in 1927 as new Alison course with new land.  Those Ross features I believe do NOT exist.  I believe Tony is out of town but this is his response from a prior thread regarding CCD.  Tony Gholz is a C&H expert. 



Ben:


Thanks for chiming in.  I'm fully aware of what happened at CC of Detroit, but for this exercise I am trying to identify all of the work Ross did do, and CC of D fits the bill.  There are a number of courses on this list where his work has been altered, replaced entirely or the course has gone away.  Unfortunately, time and space would make it prohibitive to list the entire history of every Ross project.  I suppose it would be possible, but I'm looking to wrap this thread up by the time the Masters starts.


Sven
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

MCirba

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #44 on: February 07, 2018, 03:44:26 PM »
Sven,

My you've been busy...great work!   :D

I'm hoping this is helpful regarding Bass River.   It's from a 1993 publication by Paul Harber titled, "The Complete Guide to Golf on Cape Cod, Nantucket, and Martha's Vineyard".



"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent" - Calvin Coolidge

https://cobbscreek.org/

Anthony Gholz

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2018, 01:06:14 PM »
Sven:


Kudos for attempting the (almost) impossible in this thread.  I think you should write the new book on Ross as your asides are very astute and go well with the layers of information presented.  I also appreciate Ben trying to stick a fork in the Colt course, but you and I have reviewed that before and I think we're in agreement there.  Happily what I wrote 3 years ago isn't totally out of date today.


A couple points, first re The CCD: 


Although the article you put forward was published in July of 1915 as a lead up to the US AM, the changes described were from Colt's final trip to the US in 1914.  Clearly Ross and Colt knew each other in a working relationship from his first trip in 1911 and the follow up visit in 1913.  The course is clearly Colt's design although the local historian at The CCD would give much credit to Archie Simpson who had come over to be the head pro.   In fact Colt and Simpson played golf together during that first visit in 1911 on the CCD's downtown GP course by Bert Way.  So the plot thickened right from the get go.  Simpson and Colt would have had common architectural references to discuss from GB&I.


The Ross references come first from your article by Howard lee a local CCD player of scratch abilities who played in national tournament sea wrote about golf occasionally.  If he says Ross was there, I'd take his word for it.  The key player though at this time in Detroit golf was John Sweeney, also mentioned by Lee.  He knew everyone locally and also nationally and put course founders and architects together almost at will.  He personally designed the Lochmoor Course and was involved at the CCD and DGC and others in the Detroit District through the 1920s.  I have no doubt if Ross was in town at the same time as Colt that Sweeney knew about it and brought them to whatever project he was working on at the time.  Walter Travis at loch moor is a good example where Travis "consulted" though more of gave his blessing to Sweeney;'s efforts. 


I go on about this only to suggest that Sweeney was a "natural" at bringing architects both of the professional and amateur variety, all with distinguished pedigree.  IMO Ross waved his hand over the course at Sweeney's request and perhaps made a few suggestions.  Colt was on-site for 2 weeks (albeit 2 and maybe 3 times), Ross for one day, and Simpson was there 24/7.  And he probably had more influence than anyone other than Colt on the course's details, dare I say re most of the bunkering detail work.


Regarding Detroit Golf Club:


I have been following the DGC history for many years having played (poorly) the DGC in USGA Jr qualifying rounds as a kid and more recently trading information with John King their historian regarding their first Highland Park course probably being a Bendelow 1900 design (although NOT for certain) and following along thru the Way years as designer, contractor, and as part of his professional family.  Ross was clearly in Detroit in 1914, however, I don't believe that the first plan for the 36 hole DGC layout, on additional and overlapping new land northwest of the Way course, was by Ross.  I have read three articles which lame to believe that 1) Colt revised the bunkering on Way;s course with his agreement in 1913 and did the first plan for 36 holes on the "new" property.  This include a plan where "One will be a full length course while the other ... may be shorter the laid out an bunkered as to render [it] as difficult as the other."  Sound familiar?


So maybe Colt did the new DGC 2-course Master Plan and Ross followed up on it in 1915/16 as Colt was involved in a WW and never came back to North America.  Mystery's abound!


[size=78%]Thanks for your efforts and I'm particularly following all the instances where Colt and Ross and later Alison intersected.[/size]
Anthony








Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #46 on: February 08, 2018, 09:23:17 PM »
1915

Belleair Country Club - #1 West (Belleair, FL) - 9 Holes, New in 1915, 9 Holes, Remodel in 1915, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 36 Holes.

March 14, 1914 Tampa Times -



March 27, 1914 Tampa Tribune -



Dec. 1914 Golf Magazine -









Dec. 1914 Golfers Magazine -



Jan. 1915 Golf Magazine -



Dec. 1915 Golf Magazine -






Belleaire Country Club - #2 East (Belleair, FL) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 36 Holes.

See articles above.


Cedar Rapids Country Club (Cedar Rapids, IA) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

Cedar Rapids has been the subject of a lot of conversation on this site of late.  It would have been quite the excursion for Ross, tacking on some extra miles beyond Chicago.  It is of interest to note the bit of hyperbole Ross included at the end of the second article, something that more than a few architects were guilty of.

April 1915 American Golfer -



July 7, 1917 Des Moines Register -



Plan of Course as designed by Ross -




Ravisloe Country Club (Homewood, IL) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1915, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Listing - Date changed to 1916-24

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes, Remodeled.

I'm not sure where the 1915 date comes from here, nor the number of holes.  The course had been recently renovated in 1910 according to suggestions made by William Watson.  Ross showed up in 1918, but the scope of his changes didn't extend beyond a few holes.

May 17, 1918 Chicago Tribune -



May 18, 1918 Chicago Tribune -




Skokie Country Club (Glencoe, IL) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1915, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Date changed to 1914

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes, Remodeled.

On the other hand, Skokie was pretty much a full reworking of the existing course, and Ross probably should get credit for new holes here as much of today's course is due to his handiwork.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 below.

May 21, 1914 Lake Shore News -



May 7, 1915 Lake Shore News -





Bendelow Layout -



Ross Layout -



Langford Layout -




Shawnee Country Club (Topeka, KS) - 18 Holes, New in 1915 1921, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

For a while the story at Shawnee was that Ross never set foot on property, and designed the course from topos.  He was there in 1915, and came up with plans for an 18 hole course that matches what is on the ground today.  The course has an interesting history in two regards.  First, the construction of the full 18 holes was delayed until 1921 with Robert Fullerton laying out a temporary 9 hole course for the membership to use in the interim.  Second, the original plan was for the CC of Topeka to move to the Shawnee property in due course, taking over the course that was designed by Ross.  Those plans were scrapped when the CCoT decided to expand their existing course and the Shawnee club purchased its land.

See also the Jan. 8, 1916 The Pinehurst Outlook and June 17, 1916 The Evening Post articles in post #47 below.

May 8, 1915 Topeka State Journal -




Sept. 1, 1915 Topeka State Journal -



Sept. 3, 1915 Topeka State Journal -



May 17, 1919 Topeka State Journal -




April 29, 1921 Topeka State Journal -



April 30, 1921 Topeka State Journal -




Concord Country Club (Concord, MA) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Now reads 9/9 Holes, New in 1914 & 1930

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

As the article below, Ross was brought in to design 9 holes in 1915.  Ross returned in the late '20's to add 9 additional holes.

Dec. 1915 American Golfer -






Nov. 12, 1925 Ross Letter -



Oct. 6, 1930 Boston Globe -




Balsams Grand Resort Hotel: Panorama Course (Dixville Notch, NH) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 holes.

Ross' work here started as early as 1913 (see the two articles in post #27 above).  See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 below.

Dec. 13, 1913 Pinehurst Outlook -



July 1914 Northward Ho Magazine -



Aug. 1914 Golf Magazine -



1912 Ross Plan -



June 1922 Golf Illustrated -




Mount Washington Golf Course (o/k/a Bretton Woods) (Bretton Woods, NH) - 9 Holes, New in 1915, 18 Holes, Remodel in 1815, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Listing - 1815 changed to 1915

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 27 holes.

Obviously the 1815 date in the listing is wrong.   The thought is that Ross remodeled the existing 18 hole course and added 9 new ones making 27 in total.  The Annual Guides first note the additional new 9 hole course in 1921.  I have found nothing describing Ross' work here.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 below.

As an aside, many of the northern resort courses were considered health retreats, much like the Greenbrier or the Hot Springs in Arkansas.  There's a great article penned by Alexa Stirling in one of the magazine that dispels her imminent death and any other bodily ailments after news of a short visit to Rutland, VT was released.  She was simply there to play golf.

Aug. 1914 Golf Magazine -



June 1927 Golf Illustrated -




Deal Golf & Country Club (Deal, NJ) - 3 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Listing - changed to 3 Holes, Remodel in 1915

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Ross was here in 1918 and suggested a number of changes.




Seaview Resort (Bay Course) (Absecon, NJ) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

If you hunt around in the back pages of this site, there are a number of threads dealing with the history of Seaview.  The short story is that the original Bay Course was done by Hugh Wilson a few years prior to 1915, with Ross being brought in to bunker the course.  Ross left detailed plans, but not all of his suggestions were carried out.

May 1915 American Golfer -




Glenburnie Golf Course (Lake George, NY) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Another mystery.  The course dates to 1909, and was laid out by Alex Findlay.  Other sources note Ross was here in 1915 and remodeled the course and added a few holes, but I've seen no press accounts to verify this.


Chillicothe Country Club (Chillicothe, OH) - 9 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Ross did the original lay out for the club, which was replaced a few years later by a new course.

May 29, 1922 Chillicothe Gazette -






Oakwood Club (Cleveland, OH) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1915, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Listing - NLE - 2011 added

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes Remodeled.

Something doesn't jive between the two reports below and a July 1921 Golf Illustrated notation that Ross laid out the course 8 years ago.  Oakwood was reported as a remodel in the Jan. 8, 1915 Pinehurst Outlook article in post #47 below.

1914 Spalding Official Golf Guide -



Cleveland Area Golf book -




Shaker Heights Country Club (Shaker Heights, OH) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

The date here should be earlier.  Shaker Heights was formed around 1913 as a reorganization of the Euclid Club.  The Oct. 1913 edition of American Golfer noted a new course had been started under the direction of Ross.

April 1915 Golfers Magazine -








1932 Map of the Course -




Newport Country Club (Newport, RI) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1915, Still in Existence

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Another one with no press accounts for verification.  The location and timing certainly make sense (although I don't believe Ross had yet set up his summer quarters in Rhode Island).


Washington Golf & Country Club (Arlington, VA) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Date changed to 1922

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

I have no evidence of Ross doing any work here.  I'll let the 1922 article below speak for itself as to the state of the course up until that time and whether it seems likely that he had.

Oct. 29, 1922 The Sunday Star -






Oconomowoc Golf Club (Oconomowoc, WI) - 18 Holes, New in 1915, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

In addition to the notations in the Jan. 8, 1916 Pinehurst Outlook and June 17, 1916 The Evening Post articles in post #47 below, there is a course plan that notes it was laid out by him in 1915.  There was also an interesting article that covered the use of peat in the construction of the new course.

Jan. 1916 American Golfer -



1915 Ross Plan -




Additions:

Somerset Hills CC (Bernardsville, NJ)

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

When Somerset decided to build a new course on new land, Ross was the first architect they called on.  The commission eventually went to Tillinghast, and it would be interesting to know why this switch was made and if Ross ever visited the site and/or offered up preliminary plans.

Dec. 4, 1915 Central New Jersey Home News -




Pittsburgh Field Club (Pittsburgh, PA)

2018 DRS Update - Added to the listing as 5 Holes, Remodel c. 1916

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

The club's history notes that after Alex Findlay submitted his design for the new 18 hole course, Ross or an associate submitted their own plans to revise holes 2-6, plans that were carried out in 1917.  I have not seen anything concrete that backs up this assertion.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 04:15:42 PM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #47 on: February 09, 2018, 08:45:32 PM »
1916 and the start of World War I marked a slow down in the design business across the country.  However, you wouldn't know it by looking at Ross' output.  Although his numbers would be a bit down in 1918, 1916 and 1917 were banner years.  Before we dive into the actual courses, here a number of articles from 1916 dealing with his work in general.

First up, a Jan. 8, 1916 Pinehurst Outlook article.  This article presents a fascinating look into not only the demands on Ross, half of the requests for new courses and half to modernize earlier efforts, but also his methods once hired (as an aside, I'd love to know what the "hopeless" course and the Connecticut $12,000 mistake were as well as the summer resort course which he bid out at $100,000).  No where in the article, nor in any discussion of the courses we've covered so far, does it sound like Ross "mailed it in."  The article does cover the thought that Ross would leave a club with detailed plans to be implemented by others, but it also makes the point that he had a particular genius for creating plans that could be easily followed and which resulted in a superior final product.







April 1916 Golf Illustrated -



I've previously posted the following article which was forwarded to me by Jim Kennedy and that thread has a bit of conversation on some of its details.

http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,58323.msg1367778.html#msg1367778

The major takeaway for this thread are the demands on Ross' time that were created by the sheer volume of work he was requested to take on.  Combine that with Tucker's comments in the article about the difficulties of finding good workmen to translate the ideas to the ground, and you can understand why Ross not only needed but held on to the associates he worked with.  Why would a J. B. McGovern or a Walter Hatch want to put out their own shingle when staying with Ross meant they'd have all of the work they could ever want? 





One last quick note from 1916.  There are a few mentions of Walter Fovargue moving to California that have the same comment about his understudy role with Ross as noted below.  I'm not sure what kind of business relationship they had, if any, but it would be interesting to know if Fovargue and Ross were sharing ideas, or if there was some kind of teacher/student arrangement between the two.  Ross and Fovargue certainly would have known each other from Skokie.

Dec. 15, 1916 Hartford Courant -

« Last Edit: February 27, 2018, 11:33:55 AM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Sven Nilsen

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Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #48 on: February 11, 2018, 11:04:15 AM »
1916

Lakewood Golf Club (Lakewood, CO) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1916, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Another Bendelow course that Ross supposedly reworked.  What is interesting in this case is that Bendelow returned in 1921, casting a bit of doubt on Ross being there in the interim, although the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 above noting Frank Woodward's request for Ross to remodel a course in Denver.

Fort Myers Golf & Country Club (Fort Myers, FL) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

One of the first Ross/McGovern combinations.  The course of the private club would be purchased by the city in 1927 and operated as a municipal course.

Oct. 23, 1916 Tampa Tribune -



Dec. 6, 1916 Fort Myers News-Press -



Dec. 13, 1916 Fort Myers News-Press -



Nov. 30, 1933 Fot Myers News-Press -



Plan of the Course -




Ponce de Leon Resort & Country Club (St. Augustine, FL) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, NLE

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 36 Holes.

This was originally the St. Augustine Links - North course.  Ross laid out both the North and South courses in 1916, with the South course opening first.



Ross Plan -




St. Augustine Links - South (St. Augustine, FL) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, NLE

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 36 Holes.

See also the Jan. 8, 1916 Pinehurst Outlook and June 17, 1916 articles in post #47 above.

Aug. 20, 1915 Orlando Sentinel -



Dec. 28, 1916 Brooklyn Daily Eagle -




Bob O'Link Golf Club (Highland Park, IL) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Bob O'Link would be reworked by Alison about a decade later, but the first effort was Ross.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 above.

May 25, 1916 Chicago Tribune -



May 27, 1916 Chicago Tribune -




1916 Ross Plan -




Cohasse Country Club (Southbridge, MA) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, 4 Holes, Remodel in 1930, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Changed to "9 Holes, New in 1918, 4 Holes, Remodel in 1927"

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Pinehurst Outlook article in post #47 above discussing Ross doing a new course in Southbridge.

The plan below was prepared in the late 1920's.




Pocasset Golf Club (Pocasset, MA) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

The first article below notes the course was expanded from its original 9 holes to 18 in 1924, with Ross as architect.  I have found nothing that details who did the original 9 hole course.

Aug. 17, 1924 Boston Globe -





Aug. 30, 1934 Boston Globe -




Weston Golf Club (Weston, MA) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, 9 Holes, New in 1923, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

Sept. 1916 American Golfer -





Sept. 2, 1917 Boston Globe -



The Ross Plan copied below from 1923 shows the full 18 hole course.

1923 Ross Plan -



I don't have a date on this image of Weston, but wanted to include it as it is one of my favorite early golf course photos and really shows off the rolling New England countryside and the glacial deposits the early pioneers (in golf and other matters) had to work with.




Winchester Country Club (Winchester, MA) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, 18 Holes, Remodel in 1928, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

Ross' first work here started as early as 1909 as described below and later in 1913, as noted in the Feb. 16, 1913 Wilmington Morning Star article posted earlier in the thread.  As noted below, his later remodel work took place in 1921 and 1924, as well as in 1928.

Aug. 24, 1909 Boston Globe -





Jan. 26, 1921 Boston Globe -



April 18, 1925 Boston Globe -



Jan. 8, 1930 Boston Globe -






Augusta Country Club (Manchester, ME) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

I don't have anything on Ross here.


Northeast Harbor Golf Club (Northeast Harbor, ME) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not noted in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

The club's website lists Arthur Longwood as responsible for the 9 hole course built in 1916.  I haven't seen anything to confirm or contradict this or Ross' involvement.


Shadow Ridge Golf Club (o/k/a Ionia CC) (Ionia, MI) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

One of the least discussed Ross courses on this site, and one where you can probably find his work pretty much untouched (Joe Hancock has been quietly offering up Shadow Ridge for a while).

See also the Jan. 8, 1916 Pinehurst Outlook article in post #47 above noting a new course in Detroit.

Sept. 22, 1915 Detroit Free Press -



Nov. 1916 American Golfer -






Tryon Country Club (Tryon, NC) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

The Givens site has the map copied below, which doesn't explicitly note Ross.  Perhaps the fine print does, but the version on their site is too small to make it out.




Lake Tarleton Club (Pike, NH) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, NLE

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

I have no evidence of Ross' involvement here.


Englewood Country Club (Englewood, NJ) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1916, NLE in 1976

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 holes.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 above.

April 1916 Golf Magazine -



May 1916 Golf Illustrated -



June 1916 Golf Illustrated -




Ridgewood Country Club (Ridgewood, NJ) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1916, NLE

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

Ross' work here was in 1915.

March 3, 1915 Paterson Morning Call -



Jan. 24, 1917 Brooklyn Daily Eagle -




Riverton Country Club (Riverton, NJ) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1916, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Date changed to 1915-17

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 holes.

This was a R9/A9, as there were only 9 existing holes prior to Ross.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 above.

Oct. 4, 1917 Evening Public Ledger -



Jan. 10, 1918 The Sun -




Hudson River Country Club (Yonkers, NY) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, NLE in 1966

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 holes.

In 1915 the Saegkill CC decided to update its course by rearranging its present links.  The club eventually changed its name in 1916, and brought Will MacFarlane in for the renovation.  Two years later their were reports of Willie Tucker remodeling and extending the course.  The only mention I have of Ross is his being brought in 1919 to rework the greens.

Sept. 14, 1919 The Sun -




Irondequoit Country Club (Rochester, NY) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 9 Holes.

The following Oct. 10, 1917 Democrat and Chronicle article suggests this work may have taken place in 1917.



Ross and McGovern would return around 1945 to design an additional 9 holes that would be built after Ross' death.

July 3, 1952 Rochester Democrat and Chronicle -



1945 Ross/McGovern Plan -



Course Plan -




Scioto Country Club (Columbus, OH) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

Surprisingly quiet in the press on this on, but undoubtedly all Ross.

May 25, 1919 Cincinnati Enquirer -







May 1926 USGA Green Section Record -










Conewango Valley Country Club (Warren, PA) - 9 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

In addition to the article below, see the Ross Letters and Notes included in post #175 in this thread and the notation of a new course in Warren in the Jan. 8, 1916 Pinehurst Outlook article in post #47 above.

April 28, 1928 Warren Tribune -




Gulph Mills Country Club (King of Prussia, PA) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

July 8, 1916 New York Times -



July 1, 1918 Evening Public Ledger -



July 15, 1918 Evening Public Ledger -




Kahkwa Club (Erie, PA) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Changed to 18 Holes, New in 1916-19, 18 Holes, Remodel in 1927

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

According to the March 1922 edition of Golfers Magazine, the Ross course was completed in 1918, not sure when Ross' involvement started.

See also the June 17, 1916 The Evening Post article in post #47 above discussing a remodel for the Erie CC.

March 1922 Golfers Magazine -



Ross Plan -




Homestead Old Course, The (o/k/a Virginia Hot Springs) (Hot Springs, VA) - 18 Holes, Remodel in 1916, Still in Existence

Not included in the 1930 Ross Booklet.

I have nothing to confirm Ross at any time at Hot Springs other than the course map copied below which can be found on the Givens site.  We touched on the history of the course earlier this year in another thread -

http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,64670.msg1541424.html#msg1541424.

Ross Plan -




Woodlands Golf Course (f/k/a Hampton Roads GC o/k/a Hampton GC) (Hampton, VA) - 18 Holes, New in 1916, Still in Existence

2018 DRS Update - Changed to 18 Holes, Remodel in 1928

The 1930 Ross Booklet notes 18 Holes.

I don't have anything addressing Ross here in 1916, and the Annual Guides don't note an 18 hole course until 1923.  Ross did submit plans to rework the course in 1929.

Jan. 30, 1929 Daily Press -



Oct. 6, 1935 Daily Press -



Nov. 18, 1935 Daily Press -



« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 10:10:41 AM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

MCirba

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Reunderstanding Ross
« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2018, 02:03:51 PM »
Sven,

Ross incorporated a pretty significant portion of the original John Reid/George Coale 9 hole course at Riverton when he brought the course to 18 holes.    Even some of the old cross bunkers are still in evidence today, thanks.

The following Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger article from 1918 gives more information about the extent of Ross's work.

« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 02:15:03 PM by MCirba »
"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent" - Calvin Coolidge

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