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Paul Gray

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #50 on: August 08, 2015, 04:05:29 PM »
I think you mean Brits. The rest of Europe drives on the right and is broadly aware of the sun
And Brits, at least of the English sort, are increasing hostile towards their Euro brethren.


Hmm, speak for yourself. Tis a bit more complicated than that.


Quite right Adam.


Clearly Adam has a brain and is therefore not likelly to be caught patrolling the White Cliffs of Dover, unlike some of our fellow Brits!  ;D


The Euro is a different issue, created largely through idiotic idealism, rather than sound economics. Being a good centre-left Keynesian, I could and did predict it's inevitable failure in nations such as Greece. If however Germany, France and a few other economically convergent northern European nations want to share a currency, that's fine and dandy in the multi-tier Europe we have always needed but has long been denounced by the tories. I believe it was John Major as Prime Minister who dismissed the notion out of hand when Paddy Ashdown was promoting it.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2015, 04:14:24 PM by Paul Gray »
In the places where golf cuts through pretension and elitism, it thrives and will continue to thrive because the simple virtues of the game and its attendant culture are allowed to be most apparent. - Tim Gavrich

Bill_McBride

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #51 on: August 08, 2015, 07:31:05 PM »
Where do the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish go ?


One Scot we know well (initials FBD) loves Orlando but Cypress Point will do in a pinch.   ;D

Dan Herrmann

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #52 on: August 09, 2015, 07:15:06 PM »
Ps. It's a huge nation.   

A friend had Euro relatives visit them in Buffalo.   They went for a drive and called 7 hours later to report that they were STILL in New York State!   

Ronald Montesano

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #53 on: August 09, 2015, 08:30:27 PM »
I'm guessing that Palotta's tort was tongue-in-cheek, given his level of edification.


As for McEwen, I have no idea what is wrong with rooting for anyone...oh wait, I see that in Australia, it means to bang someone. Got it.
Maybe for 2022
~Eden Valley
~Hillview
~Pinehurst (NY)
~Kis 'N Greens
~Pine Meadows
~18 Mile Creek
~Greenwood
~Shawnee
~Leroy
~

Mark Pavy

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #54 on: August 09, 2015, 08:51:37 PM »
One question I have for the Americans:

What's the story with the over use of "great"? 

Daryl David

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #55 on: August 09, 2015, 09:39:35 PM »
One question I have for the Americans:

What's the story with the over use of "great"?


Sort of like the overuse of "brilliant".

Jimmy Chandler

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #56 on: August 09, 2015, 09:47:13 PM »
If given the option at a barbecue joint, choose:  a) pork over beef; b) spareribs over baby backs; c) dry over wet; and sweet tea over unsweet.    Apply sauce sparingly if at all and don't fret over the sides.   Bogey
Agreed with three addendums:

1. In Texas, the best barbecue (aka BBQ) is beef brisket. In Kansas City (or anywhere else they offer them), don't miss the burnt ends. Everywhere else the best bbq is usually pork. Personally, my favorite is usually a pulled pork sandwich.
2. BBQ varies quite a lot by region in U.S. It's best by reputation in Texas, Memphis, North Carolina and Kansas City, but good or better bbq can be found across the south and many other parts, even here in New York City.
3. The dingier the BBQ joint appears, the more likely it has tasty food. Unless eating in a big city like New York, where you can get good, authentic BBQ but the prices will seem outrageous (especially if you've been to a BBQ shack in a small town in the south).


An old, but still relevant and entertaining multi-part series in Slate about American BBQ, An American Barbecue Pilgrimage.

Mike Hendren

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #57 on: August 10, 2015, 09:33:36 AM »
Jimmy, I do have a soft spot for burnt ends.
Two Corinthians walk into a bar ....

J Sadowsky

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #58 on: August 10, 2015, 09:55:59 AM »
If given the option at a barbecue joint, choose:  a) pork over beef; b) spareribs over baby backs; c) dry over wet; and sweet tea over unsweet.    Apply sauce sparingly if at all and don't fret over the sides.   Bogey
Agreed with three addendums:

1. In Texas, the best barbecue (aka BBQ) is beef brisket. In Kansas City (or anywhere else they offer them), don't miss the burnt ends. Everywhere else the best bbq is usually pork. Personally, my favorite is usually a pulled pork sandwich.
2. BBQ varies quite a lot by region in U.S. It's best by reputation in Texas, Memphis, North Carolina and Kansas City, but good or better bbq can be found across the south and many other parts, even here in New York City.
3. The dingier the BBQ joint appears, the more likely it has tasty food. Unless eating in a big city like New York, where you can get good, authentic BBQ but the prices will seem outrageous (especially if you've been to a BBQ shack in a small town in the south).



An old, but still relevant and entertaining multi-part series in Slate about American BBQ, An American Barbecue Pilgrimage.

The best food, particularly for the money, in any coastal American city is likely to be non-Chinese Asian food.

For a true American experience, eat a pb and j sandwich.

And at a bbq, do feet over the sides.  Another uniquely american dish is Mac and cheese.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2015, 10:42:29 PM by J Sadowsky »

Jason Topp

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #59 on: August 10, 2015, 10:56:20 AM »
I once had guests from England who were completely spooked by a thunder storm.  Maybe they do not happen as often there? So:
If you hear thunder or a wierd sounding alarm on the course, go inside.  It is not a huge emergency but lightning can kill you.  You are safe inside.
 

JJShanley

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #60 on: August 10, 2015, 11:01:24 AM »
I once had guests from England who were completely spooked by a thunder storm.  Maybe they do not happen as often there? So:
If you hear thunder or a wierd sounding alarm on the course, go inside.  It is not a huge emergency but lightning can kill you.  You are safe inside.


The U.K. doesn't typically get the prolonged thunderstorms that you see in various parts of the U.S.  In Scotland you typically only get a bolt of lightning or two, then rain. 

Wayne_Kozun

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #61 on: August 10, 2015, 11:07:47 AM »
If you hear thunder or a wierd sounding alarm on the course, go inside.  It is not a huge emergency but lightning can kill you.  You are safe inside.
Or carry a 1 iron.

Garland Bayley

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #62 on: August 10, 2015, 08:27:34 PM »
One question I have for the Americans:

What's the story with the over use of "great"?


Sort of like the overuse of "brilliant".


Kudos David. ;D

"I enjoy a course where the challenges are contained WITHIN it, and recovery is part of the game  not a course where the challenge is to stay ON it." Jeff Warne

Garland Bayley

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #63 on: August 10, 2015, 08:29:38 PM »
Deduct at least two from you inflated R&A handicap.


Bogey's sweet tea thing only applies approximately to formerly Confederate States. The rest of the country drinks it properly without the sugar.

"I enjoy a course where the challenges are contained WITHIN it, and recovery is part of the game  not a course where the challenge is to stay ON it." Jeff Warne

Wayne_Kozun

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #64 on: August 10, 2015, 08:59:56 PM »
By the way, when you order tea in some places they will ask "Hot or cold". 

Bill_McBride

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #65 on: August 10, 2015, 10:27:07 PM »
By the way, when you order tea in some places they will ask "Hot or cold".


Down south it's "sweet or unsweet."   ;D

JJShanley

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #66 on: August 10, 2015, 10:45:15 PM »
If you're a Brit, bring a stash of Yorkshire Tea for safety. 

Jimmy Chandler

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #67 on: August 11, 2015, 06:13:29 PM »

The best food, particularly for the money, in any coastal American city is likely to be non-Chinese Asian food.

This is a great point. However, Chinese food in America tastes very different from Chinese food in England (and, I suppose, in other European countries). I believe it's because Chinese chefs try to modify their foods for the local tastes.


In NY, LA and San Francisco, you can get authentic, regional Chinese cuisine. Go for it! But you have to know what to look for. Elsewhere, "Chinese" food in the US is really American-Chinese food.


Thai food is also usually Americanized. It can be great, but it's less "authentic" than some other Asian cuisines here. If you can find good Laotian or Vietnamese options, those can be amazing meals for every little money.


Lastly, I can't imagine a Brit eating Indian food in the U.S. -- mostly a waste of time since you have fantastic options where you're from.


(There are of course exceptions to every rule I have posted.)

J Sadowsky

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #68 on: August 12, 2015, 09:21:01 AM »

The best food, particularly for the money, in any coastal American city is likely to be non-Chinese Asian food.

This is a great point. However, Chinese food in America tastes very different from Chinese food in England (and, I suppose, in other European countries). I believe it's because Chinese chefs try to modify their foods for the local tastes.


In NY, LA and San Francisco, you can get authentic, regional Chinese cuisine. Go for it! But you have to know what to look for. Elsewhere, "Chinese" food in the US is really American-Chinese food.


Thai food is also usually Americanized. It can be great, but it's less "authentic" than some other Asian cuisines here. If you can find good Laotian or Vietnamese options, those can be amazing meals for every little money.


Lastly, I can't imagine a Brit eating Indian food in the U.S. -- mostly a waste of time since you have fantastic options where you're from.


(There are of course exceptions to every rule I have posted.)


Yes, agree.  And, for the record, you can get great authentic Chinese food in DC (well, Arlington, VA), at Peter Chang's.   


On food, either find a foodie friend or do your research.

Carl Johnson

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #69 on: August 12, 2015, 10:56:12 AM »
By the way, when you order tea in some places they will ask "Hot or cold".

Down south it's "sweet or unsweet."   ;D

To elaborate.  I took my son's west coast in-laws to a barbeque joint in Charlotte several years ago and the first thing the waitress said when she came to table was, "Sweet or unsweet."  Not, "what would you like to drink," or "how would you like your tea."  They were completely flummoxed.  And, by the way, as should be clear from the question, not all southerners like their ice tea sweet.

Jud_T

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #70 on: August 12, 2015, 06:36:03 PM »

The best food, particularly for the money, in any coastal American city is likely to be non-Chinese Asian food.

This is a great point. However, Chinese food in America tastes very different from Chinese food in England (and, I suppose, in other European countries). I believe it's because Chinese chefs try to modify their foods for the local tastes.


In NY, LA and San Francisco, you can get authentic, regional Chinese cuisine. Go for it! But you have to know what to look for. Elsewhere, "Chinese" food in the US is really American-Chinese food.


Thai food is also usually Americanized. It can be great, but it's less "authentic" than some other Asian cuisines here. If you can find good Laotian or Vietnamese options, those can be amazing meals for every little money.


Lastly, I can't imagine a Brit eating Indian food in the U.S. -- mostly a waste of time since you have fantastic options where you're from.


(There are of course exceptions to every rule I have posted.)


I wouldn't go with any hard and fast rules.  I've had great Thai food in Myrtle Beach and crappy steaks in Chicago.  Just get good intel from locals and reliable blogs etc.  There is great food in unexpected places across the country of all types (yes, Indian, North and South) and at all price points as long as you're willing to be adventurous and do a little homework.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 06:39:36 PM by Jud_T »
Golf is a game. We play it. Somewhere along the way we took the fun out of it and charged a premium to be punished.- - Ron Sirak

Paul Gray

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #71 on: August 12, 2015, 07:18:57 PM »
If you hear thunder or a wierd sounding alarm on the course, go inside.  It is not a huge emergency but lightning can kill you.  You are safe inside.
Or carry a 1 iron.


Well someone should congratulate Wayne for this. Good job, Wayne.  :)



In the places where golf cuts through pretension and elitism, it thrives and will continue to thrive because the simple virtues of the game and its attendant culture are allowed to be most apparent. - Tim Gavrich

Mark Chaplin

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #72 on: August 12, 2015, 10:26:41 PM »
Garland the R&A have nothing to do with handicaps unless you are a member of the R&A.

Never had more than a mistaken spat out mouthful of tea in my life, it's the juice of the devil.
Cave Nil Vino

Pete_Pittock

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #73 on: August 12, 2015, 11:47:58 PM »
By the way, when you order tea in some places they will ask "Hot or cold".

Down south it's "sweet or unsweet."   ;D
It makes a terrible Arnold Palmer. Sweet is making inroads in the mountain states.

To elaborate.  I took my son's west coast in-laws to a barbeque joint in Charlotte several years ago and the first thing the waitress said when she came to table was, "Sweet or unsweet."  Not, "what would you like to drink," or "how would you like your tea."  They were completely flummoxed.  And, by the way, as should be clear from the question, not all southerners like their ice tea sweet.

Mark Pritchett

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Re: Ying and Yang - Rules for Euros coming to America
« Reply #74 on: August 13, 2015, 10:31:07 AM »
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