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Sven Nilsen

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #100 on: February 21, 2023, 12:15:35 PM »
Clarkhurst Ranch - This was on the old estate of George, Henry and Thomas Clark, which was known as "Clarkhurst."  The estate is now part of the George Dudley Seymour State Park.  The course appears to have been built in the very late 1920's and had 9 holes.
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

V. Kmetz

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #101 on: February 21, 2023, 03:02:20 PM »

Vin,

Thank you for the addition of Terre Haute golf course, I had never heard of it before... 


Bret


Hi Bret...poking around I found this local Bethel website with as full a picture of doings at Terre Haute as anyone can hope for...hole pictures and everything...


https://www.bethelgrapevine.com/articles/terre-haute-golf-course-




seems it was developed as an owner-constructed estate course, and ultimately opened to the public in the early 60s...where it had a 20-25 year life, coming to a final curtain in 1985, when long-sought approvals for the industrial park came through.
"The tee shot must first be hit straight and long between a vast bunker on the left which whispers 'slice' in the player's ear, and a wilderness on the right which induces a hurried hook." -

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #102 on: February 21, 2023, 10:14:30 PM »
Sven,


Thank you for the information on Glastonbury and Clarkhurst Ranch. 


Vin,


Thank you for attaching the link on Terre Haute.  This is a great find. What an interesting story. Gotta love the shot tracer course tour!


Thanks to both of you for the additions, I am learning a lot.


Bret

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #103 on: February 22, 2023, 12:02:17 AM »
Golf Club of Avon-Avon, CT. FKA Avon Country Club
9 Holes, 3,400 Yards, Par 33:1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Robert J. Ross. Established in 1925.

Golf Club of Avon lists 9 holes in 1930, but it looks closer to 18 holes by 1934.  Tillinghast made a PGA site visit shortly after this aerial and discussed finishing up the course with the local architect Mr. Dodge.  Iím not sure who did exactly what and when, but the original 9 holes is credited to Robert J. Ross.  Todayís course is a Geoffrey Cornish design that utilizes some of the original holes you see in 1934. Cornish also added a new nine-hole course bringing the total to 27 holes today.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Goodwin Park Municipal Golf Course-Hartford, CT
18 Holes, 5,250 Yards, Par 72: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Harry Jackson in 1906 (original 9). Robert J. Ross 1917. 
Established in 1906.


Account of the first golf course at Goodwin Park in 1906:



An early photograph of Robert Jack Ross (2nd from left):




Goodwin Park was the first municipal golf course in Connecticut. The first nine was designed by Harry Jackson in 1906.  Robert J. Ross designed the second nine in 1917 with Robert D. Pryde consulting and Everett Pyle in charge of construction.


In 1934, Robert J. Ross added the course known today as the Short Course making Goodwin a 27-hole facility. In 1937, Ross redesigned the original 18-hole course using new land the club didnít own previously. Todayís design is mostly the routing of Robert J. Ross, with a few alterations over the years.




In 1937, the 18-hole golf course redesigned by Robert J. Ross opens:





1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Goose Run Golf Course (Military), Groton, CT
9 Holes, 2,491, Par 34: Modern Scorecard
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1927

This golf course is a new addition to the original list.  The course is located on the naval submarine base in Groton, but I know very little about itís history.  The course appears to be very similar today to what you see in the 1934 aerial.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 13, 2023, 10:40:28 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #104 on: February 22, 2023, 02:04:31 AM »
Great Neck Country Club-Waterford, CT. FKA New London Country Club
9 Holes, 2,950 Yards, Par 35:1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Charles Brooks. Established in 1925.

I have very little information on Great Neck Country Club.  The club was formerly known as New London Country Club, changing their name in the early 2000's.  I believe Charles or Charlie Brooks became the pro at New London CC after he built the golf course, but I don't have any more information on Mr. Brooks.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Greenfield Hill Country Club-Fairfield, CT NLE
No listing in 1930-1931. 18 Holes.
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1901.

Greenfield Hill Country Club is a new addition to the original list.  I donít have a lot of historical information on the golf course.  The Country Club dates back to 1901, starting as an agricultural club. The club would host an Annual Country Club Fair for the first several years of their existence. Iím not sure when golf was started at the club, but there are stories about Julius Boros growing up on a farm next door to Greenfield Hill Country Club.  He tells a story of how he would jump the fence when he was a boy and play as many holes as he could before the greenkeeper chased him off the course.  Boros began to caddie at the club when he was eleven years old. This course went out of existence before the 1949 aerial.  By 1960, houses were starting to fill the land.

Old postcard photo of the clubhouse:


A great Sports Illustrated story about Julius Boros, written in 1968. Itís a lengthy story, but full of interesting information.  The Greenfield Hill Country Club is briefly mentioned in the story.

https://vault.si.com/vault/1968/03/25/golfs-old-man-river

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.

Greenwich Country Club-Greenwich, CT. FKA Fairfield County Golf Club
18 Holes, 6521 Yards, Par 71: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Lawrence Van Etten. Revisions by Barker, Macdonald/Raynor, White
Established in 1894.

Greenwich Country Club is understood to be the oldest golf club in Connecticut.  The design history is very confusing, with many architects being engaged by the club, not just before this 1934 aerial, but after as well.  The club believes Lawrence Van Etten laid out their 1908 course which includes the bulk of the routing you see in 1934.  Sven recently posted an article about Barker visiting the club in 1911 to work on bunkers.  Macdonald and Raynor were engaged by the club around 1916 to re-bunker the course and get it into a position where it could make a bid for the Womenís National Championship. Robert White, turf consultant for the club in the 1920ís, designed two new holes on new ground. (The two holes at the bottom right of the aerial below). Further changes were made to the routing after 1934.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Here are two routings of the course from 1908 and 1915, showing how little the course had changed in that time. The 6th hole was added by 1915, and the original 17th hole, which they called ďThe AlpsĒ was removed, but the routing remained very similar to the 1908 layout. If you look at the 17th hole on the 1908 map you can imagine how crazy of a hole this must have been.  You were basically playing the 10th hole (you see below) backwards and then you had about 400 yards to go after you got to the top of the ridge.  Itís easy to see why this hole didnít last very long.

1908 Layout

1915 Layout


Here are a few before and after pictures.
Today's 2nd hole:

Today's 2nd hole after bunker work:

The original 10th hole, which no longer exists:

The 10th hole after bunker work:


Grassy Hill Country Club-Orange, CT. FKA Wepawaug C.C.,  Orange C.C.
9 Holes, 3,816 Yards, Par 39: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
9 Holes, 3,867 Yards, Par 37: 1929 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1927.

Grassy Hill Country Club was originally called Wepawaug Country Club and consisted of by far the longest 9-hole course in Connecticut at the time.  I listed two different American Annual Golf Guide listings to show that the numbers they reported were not a typo.  This course had at least three Par 5ís or Par 6ís close to 600 yards.  Grassy Hill today is 18 holes and contains a few of these holes from the original routing.  I think todays 1st, 5th, 6th and 17th holes are original. Todayís 5th hole measures 600 yards. The remaining long holes were broken into two. The 3rd hole, 7th green and 18th holes were built in the late 1930ís to make a 13-hole course at the time.  Eventually, the club bought more land across the street and Al Zikorus designed 6 new holes, dropping one hole from the original side.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial (Showing Northern 12 Holes)

Modern Aerial (Full Course)
« Last Edit: March 25, 2023, 10:55:33 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #105 on: February 22, 2023, 12:43:07 PM »
Green Woods Country Club-Winsted, CT
9 Holes, 2,162 Yards, Par 32: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1902.

Green Woods Country Club was established in 1902 very close to the Torrington/Winchester town line.  The original architect is unknown.  Revisions appear to be made quite often in the early days. The course we see in 1934 is only a portion of the property owned by the club today. Further revisions were made between 1934-1951, with that architect also being unknown.  The course certainly has a Golden Age feel on a few holes with a variety of interesting greens.  The holes that appear more modern, were designed or renovated by Al Zikorus in the 1980ís.  Zikorus added a new 1st hole, which has since been abandoned for a driving range.  The green for that hole remains and was used to extend the length of the original first hole.  From the angle you play today the 1st green slopes away hard from the fairway. Zikorus also added an alternate Par 5 fairway and green to the clubís 5th hole to add variety to an 18-hole round. I used to play in a golf league here and always enjoyed the greens and the friendly people.

Todayís course includes some of the greens pictured in this 1934 aerial.  The two greens piggy-backed over the entry road include todays 9th green (bottom) and todays practice green/1st tee (top).  Todayís alternate 1st green (for when itís too wet), 2nd, 3rd, 8th and 9th greens are still in place.  Todayís bunkerless 6th green is one my favorite complexes, and that was built between 1934-1951.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Modern Layout.  The first hole is above the driving range, the fourth hole is right of the driving range.


Guilford Lakes Golf Course-Guilford, CT
9 Holes, 1,395 Yards, Par 27: Modern Scorecard
Designed by Gardner Wheeler in 1930, Karl Schmidt (1928). Established in 1928.

This course is a new addition to the original list.  This course which started with a 2-hole course was expanded to nine holes in the Summer of 1930 by an engineering student named Gardner Wheeler.  He was 16 years old at the time he designed the course.  This course still exists and it is one of the best maintained 9-hole Par 3 courses I have ever played.  The course was rebuilt or renovated by Al and Michael Zikorus in the 1990ís.  The routing looks very similar today to Gardner Wheelerís original layout with a few modifications and modern greens.

Here is more information on Gardner Wheeler and Guilford Lakes.
https://www.cthickorygolf.org/the-courses/courses-by-architect/gardner-wheeler

The story above leads us to this 1999 New York Times article:



1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Harkness Estate Private Course-Waterford, CT NLE.  AKA-Eolia
9 Holes, 2,664 Yards, Par 35: 1936 Scorecard
Designed by: Unknown. Established in: Unknown

This course was on the private estate of Edward S. Harkness.  Wayne Stiles had worked on the property at some point as a landscape architect, so there is an inkling that he designed the golf course. However, we donít have any hard evidence to back it up, which leads us to unknown designer.  There were revisions made to the course after 1934.  The routing was changed and more bunkers were added.  This course was discussed on Page 3, replies 73 and 74 for more information on the course.

1976 aeticle/interview with a former employee of the estate:



1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial (Showing Harkness Memorial State Park)


A few pictures from Harkness Memorial State Park, showing the old estate and land the golf course occupied. This would have been looking back down the 1st hole, from near the first green.


This is the view on the 4th hole (1934 routing), where you would play out to the point.


The corridor for the 5th hole.


Looking back down the 5th hole, over one of the two bunkers scars that remain on the property.


The beach section near the Par 3, 6th hole.


The second remaining bunker from the 7th hole.


The view of the estate as you walk up the 9th hole.


Looking back down the 9th hole to the point.


Scorecard Cover-Recreated by Scott Ritter, New London Day., November 07, 2021
« Last Edit: March 06, 2023, 12:10:03 AM by Bret Lawrence »

Sven Nilsen

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #106 on: February 23, 2023, 11:01:33 AM »
Goose Run is an interesting case.  Everything I've read notes the course opened in 1951, but its clearly there in that 1934 aerial.


I wonder if the Naval Submarine Base, on which the course currently sits, was expanded at some point around WWII and took over the land on which the course sat.


Sven
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #107 on: February 23, 2023, 09:54:34 PM »
Cogswell Brook Golf Club-Ellington, CT (NLE)
9 Holes.
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1933.

This is a new addition to the original list. Sven discovered this course yesterday.  He sent along this small piece of information and the aerial below. This course was located in Ellington, close to Rockville and no longer exists.

Hartford Courant., June 23, 1933

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.

Harrisville Golf Course-Woodstock, CT.
No listing in 1930-1931.
9 Holes, 1,908 Yards, Par 30: 1960 article below
Designed by John Salvas. Established in 1927.

Harrisville was started and run by the Salvas family.  Aimee Salvas has been noted as the architect in a few publications and the original list, but this story from 1960 claims John Salvas laid out the course around 1927. This story was sent to me from Anthony Pioppi.

Hartford Courant., September 18, 1960


As the story states, the course was extended around 1960. Today, the course occupies a larger footprint than the 1934 course.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial



Hartford Golf Club-West Hartford, CT
27 Holes: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
18 Holes, 6,490 Yards, Par 71
 9 Holes, 2,130 Yards, Par 32
Designed by Devereux Emmet in 1921, Alfred Williams (1915).  Established in 1896.

Hartford Golf Club is one of the oldest clubs in the state, dating back to 1896. The club moved around in the early days eventually settling on a site between Asylum Avenue and Albany Avenue in West Hartford.  As the years passed the club gradually worked their way north, acquiring more land across Albany Avenue.  The golf course first crossed Albany Avenue in 1916, and the design of these 1915-1916 holes (which still exist in some form) had always been credited to Donald Ross.  However, several articles from 1915 and 1916 claim the design and construction of the new holes, north of Albany Avenue were the work of Alfred Williams.

More information on Alfred Williams can be found here with some information on his remaining holes at Hartford.

https://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,64126.0.html

Alfred Williams had studied under Peter Lees at Mid-Surrey in England before coming to Hartford.  He spent time at Garden City and would later construct several courses for Willie Park, Herbert Strong and at least one other design of his own, Maplewood Country Club in New Jersey. In the late teens and early 1920ís Williams advertised Hartford along with a few Strong and Park courses he constructed.

I havenít completely ruled out this could be a Donald Ross design that was built by Williams, but I have yet to see evidence that suggests this was the case. Donald Ross did visit the club in 1917 and perhaps earlier, but the 1917 visit was just to assess whether they should buy the land Emmet eventually designed his course on.  In 1921, Devereux Emmet put together a plan that includes 32 holes.  He had offered two options for todayís 3rd Hole with a Par 4 and a Par 3.  He also designed four holes in the northwest corner as a proposal for how to start and end the golf course, once the clubhouse is moved.  As you can see in the 1934 aerial, the clubhouse had not been moved by 1934 and these four holes in the northwest corner were never constructed to Emmetís plan.  It is interesting that Emmetís first, second and eighteenth holes arenít all that different from what exists today under Rossí plan.

In 1946 Donald Ross put together a 27-hole plan for the Hartford Golf Club.  The club was ready to abandon the land south of Albany Avenue and move the entire course north.  Ross put together a plan that would accommodate the new clubhouse location and he would add a new nine-hole course to the north of the new clubhouse. Ross incorporated many of the Emmet and Williams holes into his 18-hole design, while adding todayís first, second, seventeenth and eighteenth holes while making modifications to a few pre-existing holes. The additional 9-hole course designed by Ross was constructed in 1956.  The Hartford pro at the time was Sidney Covington, who had designed and built nine holes at Wethersfield Country Club in the 1920ís.

There have been many architects to come through in the years since, so I will just say: whatís left is a little complicated.  I have included several routing maps through the years and various aerial photographs to help determine which section of land youíre looking at. One interesting connection I found while looking into Hartford relates to the Clubís first Captain in 1896, named John Carolus Stirling.  John Carolus Stirling had recently moved from Chicago in 1896 and helped get the Hartford club started. Stirling was formerly a founding member and the first President of the Chicago Golf Club.

1901 Layout


1910 Alexander Findlay Layout

1915 Alfred Williams Layout

1916 Alfred Williams Layout

1921 Devereux Emmet Layout

1934 Aerial showing portion north of Albany Avenue. Site of todayís 18-hole course.

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial showing portion south of Albany Avenue. These holes no longer exist.

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial of 27-hole course.

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial showing todayís 18-hole course.

1946 Donald Ross 27-Hole Layout:

Modern Aerial showing todays 27-hole course.


Highland Country Club-Middletown, CT (NLE)
18 Holes, 6,010 Yards, Par 71: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Robert D. Pryde. Established in 1910.

Highland Country Club was founded in 1910 and designed by Robert Pryde. This course has been discussed on here before, so I will redirect you to a prior thread for more information. The thread starts by discussing the Highland Country Club, but gradually turns into a thread on Robert Pryde. I will include a routing map from 1914 for reference.  This course no longer exists.

Old thread on Highland Country Club:
https://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,50804.msg1157637.html#msg1157637

Postcard Photo of the clubhouse:

Story from Middletown Press 2018:
https://www.middletownpress.com/middletown/article/Lost-links-to-golf-courses-unearthed-in-Westfield-12714551.php

1914 Routing with 1934 Aerial below:

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2023, 03:04:10 PM by Bret Lawrence »

V. Kmetz

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Re:1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #108 on: February 24, 2023, 06:10:02 AM »
Tony:
Old Oaks in Purchase, NY was designed by Tillinghast. It was originally a 27 hole layout , but 9 holes were claimed by I-684. I can't seem to be able to manipulate the search function, but it would be neat if we could move just a little west to see if we could peer in on the lost nine.


On breaks from clubhouse jobs and waiting for loops, I actually learned to play on the "lost nine" at Old Oaks, which was called the West Course when I first traipsed around there in 1981-82. While 684 did bring its technical demise almost sixty years ago, the bones of its first four holes are still faintly visible in Old Oaks' northern boundary lands, straddling its service road... a fallow 15-20 acres which only sees dotted employee and caddie parking now.  In my youth, those faint bones were much more telling (albeit some 20 years after its demise) with bunker scoops, green mounding and tee lines still in visible relief...a weather-battered gray flag still stood. speared into the ground on two of those first four holes.  Now, though the hill and dale expanse is still the same, I might be the last one to see and identify those bones. 


What 684 blew up is/was this West Course's 5th, 6th and 7th holes. The lost West Course used to go out and back for four holes in the above-described parcel before its 5th hole headed west and descended to a green sitting in what is the wee angle of land between 684, the 13th tee of Brae Burn CC, and the 8th green and maintenance yard of Century. There too, the faintest visible bones of this 5th green were discernible up until about 15-20 years ago, but now I alone retain the recognition.


The 6th, a ENE returning one shot hole and the 7th which took golfers back up hill to the southwest corner of the clubhouse, were entirely obliterated by the I-684 project.... The 8th hole ran along the southern border of the property through today's outer tennis courts into the top of today's range... the concluding 9th was a short two shot affair traveling back toward the clubhouse.  *** This was/is one of the unique features of this course, an unclosed loop... the first tee was 250+ yards north of the clubhouse, but its return was quite near the locker room, and a further 150 -- total of maybe 400 yards -- from that first tee.


And if the CT aerials can't be toggled to capture, then check out the 1925-26 Westchester aerials or some of their further captures (1940, 47, 54, 60 etc)
« Last Edit: February 24, 2023, 06:21:43 AM by V. Kmetz »
"The tee shot must first be hit straight and long between a vast bunker on the left which whispers 'slice' in the player's ear, and a wilderness on the right which induces a hurried hook." -

Bret Lawrence

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #109 on: February 24, 2023, 09:07:38 AM »
Vin,


Thanks for the detailed information on Old Oaks.


Sven,


Thatís a good point about Goose Run.  I am not sure about the courseís history or the Submarine baseís history. I will have to look further into that course.


I noticed when I loaded the Cogswell Brook Golf Club yesterday that we had that aerial identified as Shenipset in Rockville/Ellington.  I am starting to wonder if Shenipset was still around in 1934?  I found another mention of Cogswell Brook in 1936 which mentions they were located on West street in Ellington.  I think you have identified the correct course, but I donít know if Shenipset was at a different location or if this Cogswell Brook course was formerly known as Shenipset?


Bret

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #110 on: February 25, 2023, 01:50:22 AM »
Highland Golf Club-Shelton, CT
No listing in 1930-1931. 9 Holes.
Designed by Frank H. Gates. Established in 1900.

Highland Golf Club dates back to 1900. The club credits Frank H. Gates with the design of their golf course. I have very little information on Gates, and I donít know when Gates designed the golf course. I have seen his name associated with the Central Golf Association of Connecticut, but that is about all I have on him. Highland Golf Club has a plaque honoring Frank H. Gates for his financial and moral support. The plaque also includes the years Gates served as President of the club in the late 20ís to early 30ís.

This course has been altered somewhat from 1934. Several holes have been added, rearranged or lengthened while a few original holes and greens have been retained.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Hob Nob Hill Golf Course-Salisbury, CT (NLE) AKA-I. Kent Fulton Private Estate
18 Holes.
Designed by Devereux Emmet. Established in 1933.

This course was located on the private estate of I. Kent Fulton. The 18-hole layout was designed by Devereux Emmet and built by Alfred Tull.  This layout lasted about 9 seasons before it was turned back over to nature.  It appears Mr. Fulton was very generous with his golf course, allowing many tournaments to be hosted on his links. In the early 1940ís before the course closed, the tournaments would raise money for the Red Cross.  The course closed in April 1943 and Fulton died the following year.

Devereux Emmet quote relayed from J.G. Estill:
The Lakeville Journal., July 24, 1934


Here is a tribute to I. Kent Fulton shortly after he passed, written by Joseph G. Estill. Estill was a Master at Hotchkiss and served on the golf committee along with Charles Banks in 1922-1925.  The quote posted above is repeated in this tribute.

The Lakeville Journal., June 08, 1944


An article noting the ďSilver MashieĒ tournament hosted annually at Hob Nob:
The Lakeville Journal., July 03, 1940


Another article discussing the course raising money for the Red Cross:
The Lakeville Journal., November 19, 1942



1934 Aerial Showing Northern Portion (Hob Nob Hill)

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial Showing Southern Portion (Hob Nob Hill)

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial (Hob Nob Hill Full Course)

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.

Honey Pot Country Club-Cheshire, CT (NLE) AKA Cheshire Golf Club
9 Holes, 3,000 Yards, Par 34: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1929.

I have very little information on this course.  Sven mentioned this course in Reply 95, with a couple of articles and an aerial photograph.

The course was established in 1929 with the course opening 9 holes in 1930. The name was changed to Cheshire Golf Club in 1940 and today has been developed into housing.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089;11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.

Hop Brook Golf Course-Naugatuck, CT. FKA Naugatuck Golf Club
9 Holes, 2,745 Yards, Par 36: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1902.

Naugatuck Golf Club was founded in 1902.  Naugatuck was the home club of William Burkowski (Billy Burke), where he caddied and learned to play the game. The designer for this course is unknown.  The layout you see in 1934 is very similar to the course that exists today.

Short bio on Billy Burke, including his history with the Naugatuck Golf Club:
https://www.polishsportshof.com/portfolio_page/billy-burkowski-burke/

Old clubhouse photo:

Old photograph of Naugatuck Golf Club:



1934 Aerial showing northern portion of golf course.

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial showing southern portion of golf course.

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial (Hop Brook-Full Course)

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 11, 2023, 03:31:40 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #111 on: February 25, 2023, 10:43:44 PM »
Hotchkiss School Golf Course-Lakeville, CT
9 Holes, 3,312 Yards, Par 37: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Seth J. Raynor in 1923. Revisions by Charles H. Banks in 1929.

Golf at Hotchkiss dates back to 1895. Harperís Round Table published the first routing of Hotchkiss on February 9, 1897:


The golf course expanded and moved around in the early days before Robert Pryde built a nine-hole course in 1911, which he laid out around the school. This course lasted about 10 years before an alumnus, Scott Probasco felt the course was no longer fit for students trying to learn the game. Probasco made a donation and challenged other alumni to do the same.  Hotchkiss brought in Seth Raynor in 1923. Raynor completely redesigned the Pryde course, reversing the routing, building 8 new greens and adding about 700 yards to the golf course. It was reported that Raynor left the original third green intact, because the new road (Route 112) was coming through that section of the golf course.

Charles Banks was a member of the Hotchkiss golf committee when Raynor visited the school to redesign the golf course.  As the story has been told before, Charles Banks eventually left his post at Hotchkiss, jointing Seth Raynor as a golf architect.  Banks left the school in 1925 around the time the Hotchkiss School golf course opened.  Banks was called back to Hotchkiss in 1929 to redesign the third green that was wiped out by Route 112.  At the time of the 1934 aerial, the first hole was todayís 8th hole. To explain the course as itís routed now, Banks designed todayís 1st green, and 9th hole.  Banks reversed Raynorís original 2nd fairway to play to his new green creating todayís 1st hole.  Banks created an entirely new 9th hole by clearing a corridor to wrap back around to Raynorís original 2nd green site.

The course has been altered since the 1934 aerial mainly due to the expansion of the school.  In 1937 a new entrance was built to make the school more symmetrical and reduce traffic accidents.  The new entrance warranted the move of the 7th green to a new location, shortening the hole considerably.  No one seems to know who built this new 7th green in 1937.  Todayís 2nd hole has also been shortened from a sub-300-yard Par 4 to a 165-yard Par 3.  The green and contours appear original, but the surrounds were built up into a Punchbowl when the hole was shortened.

Today's 4th green has been moved to a new location by George Bahto in the early 2000ís and the style fits in with the other greens on the course.  He originally had a hogsback spine in the green, but it was removed within a couple of years due to maintenance issues.  Todayís 1st and 9th holes are much like Banks built them. Holes 3, 5, 6 and 8 are very original to how Raynor left them.  The holes today are small circles mowed within bigger squares that are crying out for some TLC. The course contains many authentic contours in its greens that you just donít see at a lot of other courses around Connecticut.

Article mentions Seth Raynor visited the Hotchkiss school on October 19th, 1923:
Lakeville Journal., October 25, 1923:



Hotchkiss course is being constructed under the supervision of Prof. C. H. Banks:
Lakeville Journal., July 24, 1924:


Hotchkiss School Golf Course expected to open August 15, 1925.
Lakeville Journal., August 06, 1925:



Charles Banks leaves Hotchkiss to join Seth Raynor.
Published in the Lakeville Journal., August 20, 1925:



Charles Banks is hired to redesign two holes at Hotchkiss.
Lakeville Journal., December 12, 1929:



History of the Hotchkiss School Golf Course by J.G. Estill.
Lakeville Journal., July 09, 1934:



1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1951 Aerial

Modern Aerial


Hunter Memorial Golf Course-Meriden, CT FKA Meriden Municipal Golf Course
9 Holes, 2,919, Yards, Par 37. 1932 Municipal Golf Course Report
Designed by Robert J. Ross 9 Holes in 1929. Revisions by Val Flood in 1932.
Established in 1929.

This Meriden Municipal Golf Course was established in 1929.  The first nine holes were laid out by Robert J. Ross. The second nine holes were laid out by Val Flood in 1932, but the extension of the golf course was not completed by the 1934 aerial.  The nine holes we see in this aerial appear to be the design of Robert J. Ross. The course eventually had nine holes added. A few architects have visited to make changes from time to time, Alfred Tull and Al Zikorus being the two names I've seen associated with the course in modern times. Todayís course doesnít have a lot of original holes or features left over from 1934.

I have included a few articles Sven found a few years back that confirmed the course was designed by Robert J. Ross and not Robert D. Pryde as had been suggested previously.

Meriden Daily Record., August 28, 1929:


Meriden Daily Journal., April 07, 1932


18-hole layout of the course prior to acquiring land to the north discovered by Joe Bausch.
Meriden Daily Journal., October 21, 1931


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial



Indian Hill Country Club-Newington, CT. FKA-Maple Hill, New Britain Golf Club, Sequin Golf Club
18 Holes, 6,130 Yards, Par 72: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Robert J. Ross-1923, Robert D. Pryde-1912, John Duncan Dunn-1899. Established in 1899.

Indian Hill has a complicated history. Fortunately, their history has been well documented by the club.  The course we see in 1934 was mainly the design of Robert Jack Ross, who was serving as President of the club at the time of the design.  Orrin Smith was hired to construct the R.J. Ross design.  The course was first designed in 1899 by John Duncan Dunn and known as Maple Hill.  Robert Pryde made changes to the course when it was known as New Britain Golf Club.  The course changed names to Sequin in 1917 and to Indian Hill in 1932. Anyone looking for more information can find it in the Clubís Centennial below.

Link to Clubís Centennial History:
https://ihccgolf.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/centennialbook.pdf

About the only routing the club is missing in the Centennial is the New Britain Golf Club layout.  One of the members tried to recollect the course in the history and he did a pretty good job.  Here is the layout from 1917:




Todayís course has a very similar routing compared to the 1934 aerial. 

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 29, 2023, 03:30:46 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #112 on: February 26, 2023, 11:08:08 PM »
Indian Neck Golf Course-Branford, CT (NLE)
No listing in 1930-1931.
Designed by: Unknown. Established in: Unknown.

I am bringing this course back to the main list. I am not 100% sure this course had disappeared by 1934.  From the little information I have, Indian Neck appears to be a seasonal course tied to the Montowese House in Branford.  The hotel was open for business in 1934, but we have no information on the course at that time. The specific location of the golf course appears in this 1934 aerial. You may be able to spot a hole or two, but itís difficult to make out an entire course. Was this course already closed or was it not yet prepped for the upcoming season?  The information I received on this course (included below) comes from Jonas Peter Atkins.

Old photographs of the course:


Old Postcard showing the Montowese House:


1908 Article announcing the opening of the summer season at the Montowese House.


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.

Innis Arden Golf Club-Old Greenwich, CT
18 Holes, 6,300 Yards, Par 72: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Albert W. Tillinghast in 1920. Established in 1899/1905.

Innis Arden dates back to 1899 when golf was first played on the estate of J. Kennedy Tod. The 1899 courses design has always been credited to Tod, but the club moved to a new site around 1905.  According to the golf guides the club was established at their new site in 1905 as the Sound Beach Golf Club.  I donít have any detailed information on Tillinghast working here in 1920, but he does advertise Sound Beach as one of his recent redesigns for 1920.  Several architects have worked here since 1934.

The clubhouse for the original Innis Arden golf site still exists at Greenwich Point:
Connecticut Magazine., 1900


Friends of Greenwich Point.com

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Keney Park Golf Course-Hartford, CT
9 Holes, 3,017 Yards, Par 35: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Devereux Emmet-9 in 1927. Robert J. Ross-9 in 1930.
Established in 1927.

The first nine holes opened in 1927 and were designed by Devereux Emmet:



The second nine holes were designed by Robert J. Ross and opened in 1930:



Robert J. Ross changed Emmetís 2nd hole into a Par 5 and worked on the 7th hole in 1933:



Early Photographs from Keney Park found at the Hartford Public Library:








1941 Photograph of Keney Parkís original 10th green:

Noer/Milorganite Image Collection, MSU Turfgrass Information Center.
In 2014 Keney Park underwent a complete renovation of the golf course headed by Matt Dusenberry. The renovation has since vaulted the course to the top of the list of Connecticutís best public golf courses.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 16, 2023, 12:56:02 AM by Bret Lawrence »

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #113 on: February 28, 2023, 12:08:01 AM »
Lake Waramaug Country Club-New Preston, CT
9 Holes, 2,500 Yards, Par 36: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1902.

The Lake Waramaug Country Club marks their establishment as 1902. The club history claims golf was played on a four-hole course as early as 1899.  The various golf guides list Lake Waramaugís year of establishment as 1916.  I donít have any information on this course outside of the history found on the clubís website and the information in the golf guides. The designer is unknown, but itís a solid design that appears to have stood the test of time. The routing looks like it was shifted on the northern holes, due to a change in the clubhouse location. Matt Dusenberry was recently working on a renovation for Lake Waramaug.  The modern aerial below is before his work began.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089;11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Litchfield Country Club-Litchfield, CT
9 Holes, 3,029 Yards, Par 36: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Robert D. Pryde. Established in 1916.

The Litchfield Country Club was established in 1916.  Litchfield had two Tom Bendelow courses in the late 1890ís. One golf course belonged to the Litchfield Lawn Club on the west side of town, while the other course belonged to the Bantam River Golf Club (aka Litchfield Golf Club) on the east side of town. The Lawn Club eventually dropped golf from its activities, focusing more on tennis. The Bantam River Golf Club continued on for several years until they had outgrown their golf course.

In 1916, the two clubs decided to merge to form the Litchfield Country Club offering both tennis and golf, among other activities. Alain White donated land and a clubhouse for the club to build their new course.  Alain White is somewhat famous in Litchfield County for preserving over 4,000 acres of land around Litchfield back in the teens.  Today, this land is under the watchful eye of the White Memorial Foundation which was conceived by Alain White and his sister as a memorial to their parents. Alain White served as the first president of the club in 1916. According to a 25-Year Anniversary of White Memorial, Robert D. Pryde laid out the golf course in 1916.

The course follows the same routing today, but there have been a few alterations.  Several tee and fairway extensions have been added to mix up the Par between 9ís. I have been told by older members that the third green had to be completely rebuilt after the 1955 flood.


Bantam River Golf Clubhouse, early 1900ís:

Litchfield Historical Society

Todayís 2nd Hole from the 1920ís:

Litchfield Historical Society.
Map of the golf course:

Litchfield Country Club.
1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089;11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Longshore Golf Course-Westport, CT. FKA Longshore Country Club
18 holes, 6,000 Yards, Par 71: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Orrin Smith. Established in 1929.

Longshore is a municipal golf course today. I donít have a lot of information on this course other than it started as Longshore Country Club in 1929.  The course was designed by Orrin Smith and appears to share many of the holes he left behind in 1929. I believe there have been a few modifications to the course over the years, but I'm not sure who did the work.

Old Longshore Country Club Postcard Photo:


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089;11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 20, 2023, 12:32:21 AM by Bret Lawrence »

Tim Martin

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #114 on: February 28, 2023, 08:25:01 PM »
As a Connecticut native I have found this thread fascinating. Bret has done a tremendous amount of work to keep it rolling and unearthed some incredible information along the way. Iím looking forward to watching it progress.


Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #115 on: February 28, 2023, 10:55:51 PM »
Louis E. Stoner Private Estate Course-West Hartford, CT (NLE)
9 Holes.
Designed by Orrin Smith. Established in 1928.

I have very little information on this course.  Anthony Pioppi recently sent me the articles below. The first article discusses the construction of the estate:



This article mentions Orrin Smith constructed the golf course:



Louis Stoner had a son named Louis. Here, his son is playing another private estate prodigy:



1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089;11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.

Madison Country Club-Madison, CT
18 Holes, 6,152 Yards, Par 70:1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Willie Park Jr.-(9). Orrin Smith-(9). Established in 1900.

Madison Country Club began playing golf in 1900. There are reports from 1919 indicating the Club opened a new nine-hole course, seaside. Madisonís original 9 holes are credited to Willie Park Jr., yet no one seems to have any record of his visit. Madison Country Club is listed as one of Willie Parkís designs in later advertising pamphlets, similar to Country Club of New Canaan.

The club has records stating their second nine was constructed by Orrin Smith in 1930. I am not entirely sure which 9 holes belong to which architect. The club made a few alterations between this aerial and the 2000ís. Most of the changes have been made to holes 2-6 and todays Par 5 14th. Todayís third hole was extended with a new green on new property. One hole was discarded from the original routing and a new hole was designed in its place. Brian Silva came in within the last 5-10 years and completely renovated the course after Irene and Sandy came through. He rebuilt several greens, redesigned todayís 8th hole and modified todayís 14th hole, which has been changed on more than one occasion. The 18th hole was simply changed from a Par 5 to a Par 4 on the scorecard.

Postcard photo of Madison Country Clubís old clubhouse:


Two oblique aerials from 1938 showing Hurricane damage to homes around Madison Country Club:

The aerial below shows todayís 3rd hole all the way to the right. The hole to the left of this 3rd hole no longer exists. This property is filled with houses today. Across the street you are looking at todayís 1st, 7th, 8th and 18th holes.



In this aerial you are looking directly down todayís 10th hole.  The 9th and 17th hole are to the right, the 11th and 16th holes are to the left.


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089;11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Manchester Country Club-Manchester, CT
18 Holes, 5,875 Yards, Par 72: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Tom Bendelow-9 holes (1922); Devereux Emmet-9 holes (1923), Edward Connery-6 holes (1917).
Established in 1917.

Golf in Manchester, more specifically South Manchester dates back to 1897. The course was called the Orford Golf Links and the golf team consisted entirely of Cheney family members; many of whom were responsible for the growth of golf in Manchester and Connecticut. The Cheneyís owned the silk factories that the city of Manchester was famous for.  The first Connecticut Amateur champion was Thomas L. Cheney playing out of the Orford Links and Yale at the time of his victory.. The Orford Golf Links continued until 1916, before they were replaced by the Manchester Country Club.  I have been told that the Orford course was located where Manchester High School is today.

According to the club history, six holes were first built in 1917 and they are credited to Edward Connery, the Scottish pro at the time and a member, J.P. Cheney.  The club has correspondence and records that indicate Tom Bendelow built 3 new holes near the reservoir in 1922, before redesigning the 6 holes course laid out across the street. The club credits Devereux Emmet in 1923 with the design of nine holes on newly acquired property.  Emmetís holes include 5-13 in todayís routing, Bendelowís holes make up the rest (1-4; 14-18).  Tillinghast made a site visit after this aerial was taken, recommending several changes that appear to be carried out. The new location of the 16th hole appears to fall in line with Tillinghastís advice. The 14th and 15th holes, which are back-to-back Par 5ís today, appear much shorter in the 1934 aerial.  The 6th green has been moved back about 50 yards from Emmetís original location and the 8th green was rebuilt after this aerial.

Devereux Emmet's nine holes were opened in 1925.  Here is a scorecard showing the original 9 holes after Bendelow added 3 holes and redesigned the original six holes. Today's corresponding hole numbers are written in pencil next to the front nine. The back nine on the scorecard are the same nine holes duplicated.



Manchester Historical Society; Manchester Country Club : A History

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089;11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 14, 2023, 07:38:14 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #116 on: March 01, 2023, 09:50:52 PM »
Meadow Brook Country Club-Hamden, CT (NLE)
18 Holes, 5,854 Yards, Par 70: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1924.

Meadow Brook is a course we have very little early information on. The original architect is unknown. The golf course was redesigned by William Mitchell in 1947 after the Wilbur Cross Parkway cut through two holes of the golf course. You can see these two holes in the southeast corner of the 1934 aerial. The club continued to shrink as the years went on losing more land to the south. The club closed in the early 2000ís. Today the location is home to Hamden Middle School and Town Center Park.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.

Milbrook Club-Greenwich, CT
9 Holes, 3,305, Par 36: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1923.

Milbrook Club is a new addition to the original list. This is a club I know next to nothing about. The club website suggests their date of establishment is 1923.  The old golf guides suggest a date of 1926.  Anyone with information on this course please feel free to share.  The club still exists with several architects visiting between the 1934 aerial and now.

The course on the 1934 aerial and todayís course share much of the same routing.  It looks like the original 1st and 2nd holes were combined into todayís 1st.  The original 3-7, became 2-6.  A new 7th hole was constructed sometime between 1934 and now. Todayís 8th and 9th holes also appear similar to 1934. There is one extra hole in the northwest corner of the property. Iím not sure if itís a practice hole or an alternate hole for 18?

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Mill River Country Club-Stratford, CT
18 Holes, 6,020 Yards, Par 71: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Thomas Winston. Established in 1923.

Mill River Country Club was established in 1923. The 18+hole golf course was designed by Tom Winton. According to the club, Wintonís first nine holes opened in 1923, followed by the second nine holes in 1925. 

The original Tom Winton routing is mostly intact today, with the exception of one hole. Al Zikorus designed a new mid-length Par 3 12th hole to replace Wintonís shorter Par 3. Wintonís old 12th green remains in the ground as a practice hole today. If youíre looking on the aerial, the hole is located in the northwest corner of the property (close to the snack shack on the modern aerial). Zikorusí new green is directly beneath the snack shack.

EDIT:  Sven Nilsen recently discovered an article that suggests the Mill River Country Club took over the Weatogue Golf Club  property, which already had a nine-hole Robert Pryde golf course. Iíd like to find more information on Wintonís work at Mill River.  Iím not sure which nine is Prydeís and which nine is Wintonís? 

Two articles sent over to me from Sven Nilsen. The first mentions R.D. Pryde designing the new course at Weatogue Golf Club in 1915.
Bridgeport Evening Farmer., August 17, 1915:

The second article mentions Mill River has taken over the dissolved Weatogue Club.
Bridgeport Telegram. September 29, 1923:


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 26, 2023, 08:15:10 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Bret Lawrence

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #117 on: March 02, 2023, 01:56:39 AM »
New Haven Country Club-Hamden, CT
18 Holes, 6,220 Yards, Par 70: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Willie Park Jr. in 1920. Established in 1898.

New Haven Country Club was established in 1898. The club had one of the earliest 18-hole courses in the state dating back to 1900. New Haven has always been a very popular venue for state championships and state opens since these tournaments first began.

New Haven Country Club was looking to improve their golf course after the War. According to the 1948 club history, the club had asked Donald Ross and Seth Raynor to visit the site and submit design proposals, but neither architectís plans were approved. In 1920 the club hired Willie Park Jr. to redesign the golf course. The design we see in 1934 is Willie Parkís routing.  The design we see today is also Willie Parkís routing.  Not much has changed at New Haven Country Club.  The greens were carefully rebuilt about 10-12 years ago preserving much of the character that Willie Park left behind.

Old postcard photos of New Haven Country Club:


Willie Parkís plan for New Haven Country Club:


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Newtown Country Club-Newtown, CT
9 Holes, 2,225 Yards, Par 35: 1929 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by George Sparling. Established in 1915.

Newtown Country Club was established in 1915. Several Newtown Bee articles suggest George Sparling, Brooklawn pro, laid out Newtown Country Clubís nine-hole golf course in 1915.

Gene Sarazen was given an honorary membership to Newtown Country Club when he became a Brookfield resident in the 1930ís. Before Sarazen built a golf course on his property, he often took advantage of his honorary membership, frequently visiting and practicing at Newtown. To show his gratitude, Gene Sarazen once hosted a golf event to benefit the Country Clubís treasury.

Newtown follows a routing today that is very similar to the 1934 design. Many of the green sites are the same, with one or two exceptions. The greens in the modern aerial appear updated and enlarged compared to their 1934 counterparts.

Article suggesting Mr. Sparkling (sp?) from the Bridgeport Country Club was laying out the first 5 holes.  George Sparling was the pro at Brooklawn at the time.
Newtown Bee.,


Newtown Bee., May 25, 1934





Newtown Bee., May 08, 1936:


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Norfolk Country Club-Norfolk, CT
No listing in 1930-1931. 9 Holes.
Designed by Albert W. Tillinghast. Established in 1912.

When the Norfolk Country Club was established in 1917 there was only one golf course in town. Club members would play next door at the Norfolk Downs Golf Club (see listing below). Norfolk Country Club built a clubhouse in 1917 but didnít have their own golf course for the first nine or ten years of existence. The club was actually founded in 1912 using the Town Gymnasium as their original quarters.

When this Connecticut Aerial list was first put together, it had yet to be discovered that Tillinghast designed this nine-hole course. The club has found some internal information that ties this design to A.W. Tillinghast. Tillinghast later made a site visit to the Norfolk courses after this aerial was taken. At that time, Norfolk Country Club was considering buying the Norfolk Downs nine-hole course.  Tillinghast recommended the best way to link up the two courses. Needless to say, The Norfolk Downs course was never purchased, the link up never took place and today Norfolk Country Club is the only surviving course in town. A good portion of the Tillinghast design remains intact.


Pre-golf course photo:


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Iím not sure which Norfolk course this is from, so I will place it between these two listings:


Norfolk Downs Golf Club-Norfolk, CT (NLE)
9 Holes, 2,301 Yards, Par 33: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1897.

The Norfolk Downs Golf Club was established in 1897.  The golf course was a gift of Miss Isabella Eldridge, a local resident and benefactress to the town of Norfolk.  She donated many gifts to the Norfolk towns people mostly geared toward the engagement of activity, recreation and bringing people together.

Norfolk hosted several tournaments in the early days and Miss Eldridge would donate Silver Cups to offer as prizes to the winners. A few of these trophies still exist and they can be found today in the Brooklawn Country Club trophy case. Miss Eldridge passed away in 1926 and the course was taken over by her nephew.  He died shortly thereafter, and the property was leased for a period of 5 years. By 1941, the course folded.  Today the property is a tree farm, the old golf shelter still exists, and a small portion of the land now houses the Norfolk Curling Club.

An interesting early article mentioning Miss Eldridge and Dr. Cobb getting instructions from a Scottish expert. The writer also shares some golf history from an 1897 perspective:



Early photograph from Norfolk Downs Golf Club:


The golf shelter remains on the property today, next door to the Norfolk Country Club:


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial showing Norfolk Country Club (Top); Norfolk Downs (Bottom)

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2023, 03:44:10 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Sven Nilsen

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #118 on: March 02, 2023, 08:52:31 AM »
Bret:


The 1900 Connecticut Magazine article on golf in the state notes Norfolk Downs was laid out under the supervision of Dr. A. E. Cobb.


Sven
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Bret Lawrence

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #119 on: March 02, 2023, 11:15:41 AM »
Bret:


The 1900 Connecticut Magazine article on golf in the state notes Norfolk Downs was laid out under the supervision of Dr. A. E. Cobb.


Sven


Sven,


You are correct and thank you for adding that information.  The reason I wrote unknown is because I have seen a reference to a Scottish expert designing the links while Dr. Cobb (who was a local Norfolk resident) laid out the course. I could never find the name of the Scottish expert. Norfolk Downs is also a unique case in the aerials, because the course is 37 years old at the time.  It looks to me like the course has modern greens and bunkers.  I really donít know if the course we see in 1934 is the same course laid out in 1897? I also donít have information to suggest it wasnít.  Itís a course Iíd like to learn more about. I think one theme we see in these aerials, and you probably know it better than anybody is that the designs from 1900 rarely survived to 1934. 


I will be happy to put Cobbís name in if everyone thinks thatís the appropriate listing, but I think if we leave it unknown, itís more likely to encourage further research to a course that may need it.


Bret

Sven Nilsen

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #120 on: March 02, 2023, 11:24:14 AM »
I think one theme we see in these aerials, and you probably know it better than anybody is that the designs from 1900 rarely survived to 1934. 


Can we assume that once you wrap this up we'll get a follow up on the locations of all of the CT courses that were NLE by 1934?  ;)
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Bret Lawrence

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #121 on: March 02, 2023, 11:42:42 AM »
I think one theme we see in these aerials, and you probably know it better than anybody is that the designs from 1900 rarely survived to 1934. 


Can we assume that once you wrap this up we'll get a follow up on the locations of all of the CT courses that were NLE by 1934?  ;)


Not all of them!  :)


But I will go over every NLE course included on the original list.

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #122 on: March 03, 2023, 12:01:12 AM »
Norwich Golf Course-Norwich, CT. FKA Norwich Golf Club
18 Holes, 6115 Yards, Par 71: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Tull & Tull.  Established 1895.

The early golf guides are all over the place with the year of establishment for Norwich Golf Club.  Golf appears to have been played very early in Norwich.  Between 1910-1915 Robert D. Pryde was reported once or twice a year visiting the Norwich course offering suggestions for improvement. Prydeís golf course was on the same land, but his routing didnít appear to survive the redesign. In those days, the golf course was tied to the Norwich Inn.  Prydeís course went in reverse of today's 16th and 17th holes to accommodate the starting point at the Inn. The Norwich Inn still abuts the golf course property near the 17th tee, but itís heavily screened off, as the course is now run by the City of Norwich.

In the 1920ís Tull & Tull was hired by the club to redesign the golf course.
Tull & Tull consisted of William Tull and Frank Tull.  William was Alfred Tullís father and Frank was Alfredís brother.  Alfred Tull was building golf courses for Devereux Emmet in the 1920's, while Tull & Tull generally built courses for Walter Travis. There is information suggesting Walter Travis visited the course, but for one reason or another he was never hired. Tull & Tull lists both Norwich and Alexandria Bay as their own designs in a late 1920ís advertisement. The pair also include several courses they built for Walter Travis under a separate heading titled: ďCourses ConstructedĒ. The Tull & Tull designed Norwich golf course opened in 1926.

A good portion of the routing is still intact, with a few greens being replaced over the years to lengthen the course.  Holes 1-10 are similar to today.  The 11th green looks like it was moved across the stream to lengthen the hole. The 12th hole may have been shifted slightly to make up for the lost yardage on the 11th hole extension? 13-18 appear to have the same routing, with the exception of the 17th green which was moved back to lengthen the hole.

Postcard photo of the Norwich Inn:


Tull & Tlull Advertisement.
Golf Illustarted., November 1924:


1934 Aerial showing western portion of the golf course:

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerial showing eastern portion of the golf course:

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
1934 Aerials (Full Course)

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


Old Lyme Country Club
9 Holes, 2,309 Yards, Par 33: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1916.

I donít have a lot of information on Old Lyme Country Club.  I have seen reports that the club rebuilt the course after suffering significant damage from the 1938 hurricane.  Edit to the above, the club suffered damage in 1954-1955

The Day., May 25, 1955


The course includes 3 new holes on new land that can be seen as early as 1961.  Itís been reported that William Mitchell worked here in 1949, but the new holes didnít appear until long after he visited the course.  With the extension of the three holes on new land, several holes on the original land appear to be rerouted. A few original green sites and hole locations remain from 1934.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial showing western section of the golf course

Modern Aerial (Full Course)



Orange Hills Golf Course-Orange, CT FKA Rolling Ridge Country Club
No listing in 1930-1931. 9 Holes.
Designed by Robert D. Pryde. Established in 1927.

Orange Hills Golf Course was known as Rolling Ridge Country Club when it opened in 1927.  According to the club, the course only lasted four years before it was turned over to a new owner in 1930.  I have seen Robert Pryde credited with the design of this golf course, but I have no information on the year he was there.

Todayís course was redesigned by Geoffrey Cornish in 1957 and retains a few of the original Pryde holes.  Todayís 1st, 7th, 8th, 17th and 18th holes are similar to Prydeís design in 1934. Todayís 10th hole appears to be a shortened version of Prydeís hole, playing now as a long Par 3.  The 16th green is also a remnant of the Pryde course, while the remainder of the hole is a Cornish design.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archive Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial
« Last Edit: March 13, 2023, 10:33:00 PM by Bret Lawrence »

Sven Nilsen

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #123 on: March 03, 2023, 11:07:42 AM »
A bit of a mystery course that seemingly was NLE by 1934.

Elm Terrace Inn, West Haven, CT

The Inn was located right on the Long Island Sound, with the course extending back beyond along the Oyster River.  The plan below confirms the 9 holes were designed by Willie Park.


I've seen reports of golf being played here in the late 1930's, and the course is listed in a guide to recreation around New Haven from 1941.

Jan. 1922 Concrete -



Ad for the Inn -



Plan of the Course -



1934 Aerial -

« Last Edit: March 03, 2023, 11:21:05 AM by Sven Nilsen »
"As much as we have learned about the history of golf architecture in the last ten plus years, I'm convinced we have only scratched the surface."  A GCA Poster

"There's the golf hole; play it any way you please." Donald Ross

Bret Lawrence

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Re: 1934 Connecticut Aerials
« Reply #124 on: March 04, 2023, 12:24:00 PM »
Paul Block Private Estate Golf Course-Greenwich, CT. AKA Friendship
9 Holes.
Designed by Wayne Stiles & John Van Kleek. Established in 1926.

Paul Block was a newspaper publishing magnate who bought Overlook Farm in 1926.  He transformed the farm into his personal estate, moving into the house in 1929. In a 1931 advertisement, Stiles and Van Kleek list the private 9-hole course for Mr. Paul Block in Greenwich, CT as one of their designs.

The Paul Block Estate was purchased by The Convent of Sacred Heart School, a school for girls in 1942. A small section of the Paul Block Estate Golf Course is today part of Fairview Country Clubís property.  The Par 3 near the pond looks very similar to what Stiles and Van Kleek left behind but was likely rebuilt by Robert Trent Jones. The remaining two corridors shared by both courses have been reversed.

1926 Westchester County Aerial showing the golf course under construction:

The Historical Aerial Photography Collection of Westchester County, Department of Planning, 1926.
1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial



Pequabuck Golf Club-Terryville, CT. FKA Highland Golf Club
9 Holes, 3,105 Yards, Par 34: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by: Unknown. Established in 1902.

Pequabuck was established in 1902 with a five-hole golf course.  Prior to 1922, the club was known as Highland Golf Club.  Herbert Lagerblade was a member here before he moved on to Chippanee. Harry Bartholomew was also a member of Pequabuck and he was largely responsible for the success of the club as it moved into the 1920ís.  Today, there is an Annual Bartholomew Four-Ball tournament which draws players from all over the state. 

The course in the 1934 aerial looks similar to the latest layout below. Today the course has been expanded to 18 holes, using new land and a portion of the course we see in 1934.  The redesign was done by Geoffrey Cornish. Todayís 1-9 follows much of the same routing as their counterparts in this 1934 aerial. Cornish also retained todayís 16th and 17th holes. Two of the holes seen in 1934 have been turned into a driving range. Geoffrey Cornish appears to have rebuilt several of the greens leaving behind only a handful of 1934 originals.

1902 article on the new club:


A second club in town known as Clover Hill, laid out by R. B. Wilson who spent time at Shinnecock in the early days of that club:


An article discussing a potential merger between the two clubs:


Herbert Lagerblade noted as a member of Highland Golf Club:

There were several hand-drawn layouts displayed in the clubhouse a few years back.  Modern interpretations of how the course played based on member recollections.

1902 Highland Golf Club


1928 Pequabuck Golf Club


1934 Pequabuck Golf Club


1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial showing the same portion of todayís golf course:

Modern Aerial showing todayís 18-hole course:



Pine Orchard Yacht & Country Club-Branford, CT. FKA Pine Orchard Golf Club
9 Holes, 3,100 Yards, Par 38: 1930-1931 American Annual Golf Guide
Designed by Robert D. Pryde. Established in 1901.

Pine Orchard was designed by Robert Pryde in 1901. The course appears to have been rerouted since the 1934 aerial. The club experienced damage during the 1938 hurricane, with a section of the golf course submerged under water.

1934 Aerial

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Record Group 089:11a, Records of the Department of Transportation.
Modern Aerial


1938 Hurricane Aerial showing a portion of Pine Orchard submerged under water.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2023, 12:13:53 AM by Bret Lawrence »

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