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Mike Hendren

Skinny Bunkers
« on: November 20, 2002, 02:33:40 PM »
This year's Open Championship was ultimately decided by the contenders' ability to negotiate the ring or doughnut bunker to the right of Muirfield's 18th green.  The lies in that bunker were totally arbitrary given the bunker's depth - but more importantly, it's narrow ditch-like nature.  

How rare are such narrow bunkers?  I assume drainage is an impediment to their viability, but by their smaller size they require less maintenance and represent a greater hazard, particularly if faced with a shot from the rear of the bunker requiring a steep backswing.  Also,  I'd much rather play from the back of a wider bunker than have to execute a delicate pitch over a narrower one.  

Any examples of this ditch-like bunkering in the U.S. and if so how about some pictures?

Regards,

Mike
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

JohnV

Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2002, 02:42:29 PM »
There are some at PGA West - Stadium Course.  Some of them twist and turn and almost look like the rattlesnakes that used to populate the desert there.  Sorry, I don't have any pictures.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

Mike_Cirba

Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2002, 02:55:49 PM »
Short right of the 4th green at Inniscrone, Gil Hanse & Co. built a trench-like bunker that is VERY difficult, especially given the steep right to left pitch of the green. If you laid two coffins end to end, you'd have a good idea of what it looks like.

Donald Ross built one on Seaview Bay's 12th hole that's a long, narrow fairway bunker off to the right and mostly blind from the tee on a par four that I believe is called "snakepit".

The leftside bunker on #10 at Pine Valley used to be just wide enough for an angry man and his niblick, and putting sideways was sometimes the best play.  It's been unfortunately widened in the past two years.  
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:11 PM by -1 »

SPDB*

Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2002, 03:40:37 PM »
Myopia Hunt features a number of narrow, trench type bunkers.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

Patrick_Mucci

Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2002, 03:53:18 PM »
Mike,

You'll find both fairway and greenside versions at GCGC.

They tend to be more punitive in nature, hence their existance is linked to those type of courses.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

Yancey_Beamer

Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2002, 04:46:17 PM »
Midvale G&CC (1931) byRobert Trent Jones &Stanley Thompson.This was RTJ's first effort and is located in Penfield N.Y.The greens are generally rectangular and are surrounded with narrow bunkers which lie close to the greens.I have played the course and accept the fact that escapes from these bunkers can be interesting.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

Tony Petersen

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2002, 04:58:22 PM »
I would have to concurr with Mr. Mucci. Garden City Golf Club on LI offers many "skinny", penal bunkers. TOUGH, to say the least.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »
Ski - U - Mah... University of Minnesota... "Seven beers followed by two Scotches and a thimble of marijuana and it's funny how sleep comes all on it's own.

Eric Pevoto

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2002, 07:10:09 PM »
Washout right of the fifteenth green at Hanse and Co.'s French Creek GC--April 2002 This is a good early show of the chunking method used.


October 2002


Tee shot--Not really applicable, but it just looks like fun!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »
There's no home cooking these days.  It's all microwave.Bill Kittleman

Golf doesn't work for those that don't know what golf can be...Mike Nuzzo

Craig Disher

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2002, 09:20:59 PM »
I posted this aerial a while ago. The course must have been the training ground for building skinny bunkers. I'm still looking for an identification. All I know is that it was on the east end of Long Island in 1940.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

Mike Hendren

Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2002, 07:44:51 AM »
Eric,

Cool pics.  The primary difference I see between this wash-out bunker and Muirfield's dougnut is that the former has rolled up sand that insures a decent lie in the middle of the bunker.  Perhaps the term "trench" does better describe Muirfield's bunker since it is essentiallly flat bottomed, thereby yielding the risk that the backswing is impeded by the rear sod wall of the bunker.  

I must admit to a fondness for bunker play, attributable to the fact that, notwithstanding my 7.2 GHIN I hit everything heavy.  I'm one of the few who'd rather be in a bunker or thick rough than on a closely cropped chipping area around the green.  

Dave,

Six feet at the most indeed, perhaps even less?

Patrick,

Thanks for your comment.  As a result, I revsisited the GC course review.  It now ranks high upon my rather short "some day" list.  

The question remains,  why aren't more of these bunkers being built?  Is the penal school dead?

Regards,

Mike

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

Peter_Herreid

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Skinny Bunkers
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2002, 09:47:58 AM »
The front right bunker greenside on #18 at Pacific Dunes has some very "skinny" portions, and can give some very interesting lies...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1056376800 »

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