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Chris Kane

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #25 on: September 27, 2005, 06:25:38 PM »
Peter Pittock, the MCG is a great stadium (seating around 100,000), but its not the premier cricket venue by any stretch.  Lords (in London) is the home of cricket, and I'd argue that the SCG is a better venue within Australia.

Mike Benham

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #26 on: September 27, 2005, 07:46:50 PM »
How can you not consider Fenway (the stadium) over Wrigley?

The ivy covered bricks pale in comparison to the Green Monster ...

I'll give the scoreboards, centerfield for Wrigley, in the Green Monster for Fenway a tie ...

Subway/El access ... tie

More Day games ... Wrigley

Sosa or Manny?  ... both bums

Seats on rooftops ... Wrigley

Homeruns onto streets ... Wrigley just barely

Neighborhood setting ... tie

Watering holes around the stadium ... Fenway, really, Wrigley's establishment seem to be too contrived ...

It's Fenway for me ...
"... and I liked the guy ..."

Mike Benham

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2005, 07:50:37 PM »
Frog Jumping:  Calaveras County Fairgrounds

Horse Racing:  Churchill Downs

Barrel jumping:  Lake Placid, NY

Cliff Diving:  Acupulco
« Last Edit: September 27, 2005, 08:06:24 PM by Mike Benham »
"... and I liked the guy ..."

Cliff Hamm

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2005, 08:32:18 PM »
From Sports Illustrated:

      
   Century's Best
        

SI's Top 20 Venues of the 20th Century
Click here for more on this story

Sports Illustrated YOUR TAKE
What's your favorite venue? Click here to let us know, and see what some of your fellow users have said.

1 Yankee Stadium
No sports arena in history, with the possible exception of the Roman Colosseum, has played host to a wider variety of memorable events. Two popes prayed here, Johnny Unitas threw here, Jim Brown ran here, Joe Louis fought here, and Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Joe DiMaggio played here. Ground can't get more hallowed than that.
2 Augusta National
Is it the $1.50 ham sandwiches or the peach cobbler? The Crow's Nest or the Champions Room? The pushover par-5s or the murderous par-3s? The soccer-field fairways or the M.C. Escher greens? Is it because there are no pro-ams, no billboards, no blimps? Is it because being inside the ropes actually means something? Is it because every complete player has painted on this same rolling canvas, or because no player is complete until he has?
3 Michie Stadium
Game day at West Point begins three hours before kickoff with the cadet parade on The Plain. It's a scene straight from The Long Gray Line, surpassed only by the view of the Hudson River from the west stands at Michie Stadium. The Corps of Cadets, seated together and dressed in gray and black, evokes memories of when Army was one of the most formidable of college football powers, and cannon blasts shake the 76-year-old edifice to its foundation every time the Black Knights score. It doesn't matter in the least that national championships are no longer decided here.
4 Cameron Indoor Stadium
The undergraduates who pack Duke's antiquated Cameron Indoor Stadium -- those wiseacres with the 1,400 SAT scores -- are as entertaining as the games. (Pity the visiting player who has been in the news for some malfeasance.) No wonder the Blue Devils are 133-17 at home over the last 10 years. It's easy to win when you're playing six-on-five.
5 Bislett Stadium
An oval of crumbling mortar and rotted wood in a residential neighborhood not far from the center of Oslo, Bislett Stadium transforms itself each summer into a cauldron of desperate noise and rhythmic clapping that carries runners on invisible wings. Sixty-one world records have been set on its forgiving, brick-colored track; Lynn Jennings, the 10,000-meters bronze medalist in the 1992 Olympics, once called it a distance runner's Fenway Park. Bislett is scheduled to be torn down and replaced by a new stadium. Replaced but not improved upon.
6 Wrigley Field
It's impossible to feel blue at Wrigley Field, even though your beloved Cubs are losing again. The place has grown a bit larger and, amazingly enough, even more graceful since it was built in seven weeks in 1914 for $250,000. It's a national treasure, a true American original. It's ivy and brick and bleachers and a manual scoreboard and seats so close to the field you can almost hear the infield chatter of Hornsby, Hartnett and Banks.
7 Roland Garros
If you like tennis, the French Open is the best sports event in the world to attend. If you don't like tennis, it's still the best sports event in the world to attend because it's in Paris. In the spring Roland Garros is more at ease with itself than Wimbledon, which is so self-conscious. Wimbledon is in a distant suburb of London; Roland Garros is at the edge of the Bois de Boulogne. And Roland Garros may be the only friendly place in Paris.
8 Lambeau Field
In Green Bay, where the local time is always 1963, the citizens worship their Packers with religious fervor, and Lambeau Field is their ageless cathedral. The benches are aluminum, the grass (when not iced over) is resplendent, and the fans are rabid but realistic without being rude. No wonder Packers players leap into the stands after scoring touchdowns. On a truly cold day you can feel the spirit of Vince Lombardi -- even if you can't feel your toes.
9 Fenway Park
The spiritual blueprint for the dozens of new-old ballparks that have been built in the past decade, our favorite old-old ballpark, built in 1912, doggedly survives as developers plot its demise in the next decade. Babe Ruth pitched here. Ted Williams hit and spit here. Yaz won a Triple Crown here. Batters aim for the 37-foot-tall Green Monster in left because in this park, hitting the wall is always a good thing.
10 Saratoga Race Course
Directions to Saratoga Race Course, by Red Smith: "From New York City you drive north for about 175 miles, turn left on Union Avenue and go back 100 years." With its striped awnings, old wooden clubhouse and grandstand, and paddock shaded by elms, Saratoga transports you back to the days when people came to the races in surreys with the fringe on top.
11 Pebble Beach
Robert Louis Stevenson, a Scot but not a golfer, called the curve of Carmel Bay upon which the Pebble Beach golf course was built in 1919, "the most felicitous meeting of land and sea in creation." Other courses are as architecturally brilliant, but none overwhelms the senses like Pebble Beach -- raw nature is on display here as at no other golf course on earth.
12 Wembley Stadium
The most famous soccer stadium in the world was built in 1923 and that year hosted the English FA Cup Final, the so-called White Horse Final, at which 200,000 peaceable spectators were policed by a lone constable on a white stallion. Since then countless pilgrims have entered grounds as charmless as Cleveland's old Municipal Stadium. No matter: Wembley means big matches, and its mystique lies in a team's just making it here.
13 The Pit
A mile high but 37 feet underground, the Pit in Albuquerque has been the site of many mind-blowing college basketball games, including North Carolina State's upset of Houston in '83 and just about any New Mexico home game. The noise created by fans, which has been measured at 125 decibels -- the pain threshold for the human ear is 130 -- is a palpable force.
14 Boston Marathon Course
For 103 years the hale and hardy and inexplicably optimistic have gathered in little Hopkinton, Mass., at noon on Patriots' Day to run the 26.2 miles to downtown Boston. Heartbreak Hill is actually the last of four hills three quarters of the way through the journey. That climb completed, runners still have six miles to travel before they reach the office towers of the city, where the hale and the hardy will become the lame and the halt -- and victors, all of them.
15 Camden Yards
The best compliment you could give Camden Yards is that it looks old beyond its years. You can savor the game's past as well as chardonnay and shrimp from an upholstered chair in a luxury box. The builders of Camden Yards did retro right -- its success kicked off the biggest building boom in baseball history and brought about the biggest change in the majors since the DH: It made stadium revenue more important to teams than a catcher who can hit.
16 Lamade Stadium
Lamade Stadium in Williamsport, Pa., site of the Little League World Series, has seating for about 45,000, but exact attendance figures are hard to come by since there's no admission charge. For Little Leaguers, it is their ultimate goal, and for all of us former Little Leaguers, it's a monument to a simpler, nobler idea of sport -- and one of the few places on earth where you can get a dog and a soda for a buck.
17 Daytona International Speedway
In 1959, when Lee Petty won a photo finish in the inaugural Daytona 500, drivers were not yet cognizant of the aerodynamic phenomenon that made that race -- and all races on this 2.5-mile oval -- spectacular. It was and is the draft, which has led to many mad dashes for the checkered flag.
18 Notre Dame Stadium
Touchdown Jesus keeps an eye on one end zone, and Knute Rockne watches over the rest of the field. Rockne built his dream stadium and coached here in 1930, its first season, his last.
19 St. Andrews
No bulldozers built the Old Course, where sheep tamped the crabby sod into shape. Legend says bored 15th-century shepherds knocked wooden balls around the place, and the cussing and drinking haven't stopped since. Mary Queen of Scots played here; Old Tom Morris, the first golf pro, gave lessons here 130 years ago.
20 Rose Bowl
The Rose Bowl is more a postcard than a stadium, designed to seduce pasty Midwesterners with the California fantasy. How many Big Ten fans tuned in on those wintry New Year's Days to gawk at the blooming bougainvillea and started packing their station wagons at halftime?

Issue date: June 7, 1999

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Tim_Cronin

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2005, 09:19:00 PM »
No indoor stadium in the history of the world was as loud, as intimidating, as amazing as Chicago Stadium. And that was just during "The Star Spangled Banner."
The building shook. Fans outshouted the Barton pipe organ or tried to and literally hung from the rafters in the upper corners, climbing up from the second balcony to get a better view. It seated 17,154 (I counted the seats for a story) and held about 21,000 including standees. The Db level was measured in the high 120s one night during a Stanley Cup playoff game. (And Bulls fans could be loud too, when they wanted to be, but Black Hawks fans were born loud.)
About the only outdoor venue as loud (excluding engine noise), at least on a per-capita basis, is the 15th-16th green area at Augusta National. A big shot (Nicklaus 1975, Nicklaus 1986, Woods 2005) and the place rocks.
There may only be about 6,000 around the greens, but it sounds like the first lap at Indy, (the best racing facility, thank you, though I confess I have not been to the county fair and endurance race at LeMans, and want to be there, just to see the sights and ride the Ferris Wheel.
Indianapolis Motor Speedway has a half-decent Pete Dye golf course. Does LeMans have a course? Daytona?
The website: www.illinoisgolfer.net
On Twitter: @illinoisgolfer

Tom Jefferson

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2005, 09:21:51 PM »
For surfing, the PIPELINE is it.
Period.  Awesome wave close to shore, perfect sand, da kine wahines.

Tom
the pres

Mike_Sweeney

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #31 on: September 27, 2005, 09:40:15 PM »

Basketball: Philadelphia Civic Center.  Wilt Chamberlain, the greatest athlete of all time.  Michael Jordan couldn't hold his jockstrap.

Wayne, come on Wilt and Paul Arizon probably had more big games in Boston Garden then they did in the Civic Center.
 

College Football: Franklin Field.  Take Beaver Stadium and burn it.  No comparison.  Weightman Hall that closes the horseshoe is remarkable architecture as is the entire stadium.

Maybe the third best field in The Ivy League!

College Basketball: The Palestra, hands down the most historic arena in college basketball and the best place to see great games.

I know it is impossible for East Coast people to understand, but yes Pauley Pavilion built in the 60's in California edges out The Palestra. Where is Lynn S?


PThomas

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #32 on: September 27, 2005, 10:27:27 PM »
Tim - I always thought 16, at least on TV, is the most dramatic stage at Agusta...beautiful with the pond surrounded by people who are surrounded by towering trees...FAR better than 18, for ex

and Wayne:  MJ couldn't hold Wilt's jockstrap????  as Mr. Mucci said about one of my posts:  "Surely you jest"
198 played, only 2 to go!!

Lynn_Shackelford

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #33 on: September 27, 2005, 10:32:03 PM »
In its day, from opening in Nov. of 65 to about 1977, nothing in college basketball could compare to a Bruin BB game in Pauley Pavilion.  You knew you were watching the best, in a great atmosphere.  Especially the 60's when the freshmen played the first game, Alcindor and Walton as warm-up acts.  But put 20 college students in the Palestra, and you would swear you were watching/listening to a game with another 10,000 present.  When you looked at the outside of the place you feel like you are turning back the clock a bit, like walking onto the first tee at Merion or TOC.  Allen Fieldhouse in Lawrence gives you the same sense of history.  Naismith, Phog Allen, Dean Smith, Wilt, they were all there.
There was no NBA atmosphere like Boston Garden.  I regret not having seen Bobby Orr play a hockey game there.  In dirty flithy seats you were looking straight down at the most unique floor in the sport.  You felt like you were on top of the action.  Noticing Auerbach sitting there, Irish priests sitting a few rows away, the crazy Italians yelling at Havlicek behind you, the feel of history was everywhere.  Any person present could tell you the person associated with the retired numbers hanging above.  Number 6 seem to hang a little lower than the others.  A distant second in the NBA was Chicago Stadium and the might stadium organ.  
Isn't Camden Yards the Pete Dye of golf architecture, bringing style and design out of the dark ages and reintroducing classic architecture?
It must be kept in mind that the elusive charm of the game suffers as soon as any successful method of standardization is allowed to creep in.  A golf course should never pretend to be, nor is intended to be, an infallible tribunal.
               Tom Simpson

Kyle Harris

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #34 on: September 27, 2005, 11:21:50 PM »
Lynn,

Interesting you mentioned Camden Yards, thinking on that venue is what got me thinking about this thread, and I drew the same parallel. Now, it seems everybody is going back to the quirky ball park, which is great to an extent, however, a lot of architects seem to "overdo" the quirky factor. Such things as odd outfield angles were built out of necessity.

Jeff Fortson

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #35 on: September 27, 2005, 11:48:43 PM »

Baseball: Yankee Stadiumwrong -- Wrigley, by a mile



Excuse me!?  

Anyone that claims that Wrigley Field has more historical value in baseball than Yankee Stadium needs to be woken up out of that bad acid trip otherwise known as being a "Cubs Fan".

Let's do an analysis of the two teams accomplishments and Hall of Fame ball players.


Cubs    18 Divisional Titles / 10 Pennants / 2 World Championships (last one in 1908)

Pete Alexander 1918-1926  
Ernie Banks  1953-1971  
Lou Brock 1961-1964  
Mordecai Brown 1904-1912, 1916  
Frank Chance 1898-1912  
Kiki Cuyler 1928-1935  
Dizzy Dean 1938-1941  
Dennis Eckersley 1984-1986  
Gabby Hartnett  1922-1940
Billy Herman * 1931-1941  
Rogers Hornsby 1929-1932  
Fergie Jenkins * 1966-1973, 1982-1983  
King Kelly * 1880-1886  
Ralph Kiner 1953-1954  
Ryne Sandberg 1982-1997  
Joe Tinker * 1902-1912, 1916  
Billy Williams * 1959-1974  
Hack Wilson * 1926-1931


Yankees  -  42 Division Titles / 39 Pennants / 26 World Championships
 
Wade Boggs 1993-1997  
Yogi Berra 1946-1963  
Earle Combs 1924-1935  
Bill Dickey 1928-1943, 1946
Joe Dimaggio 1936-1942, 1946-1951  
Whitey Ford 1950, 1953-1967
Lou Gehrig 1923-1939  
Lefty Gomez 1930-1942  
Waite Hoyt 1921-1930  
Jim "Catfish" Hunter 1975-1979  
Reggie Jackson 1977-1981  
Willie Keeler 1903-1909  
Tony Lazzeri 1926-1937  
Mickey Mantle 1951-1968  
Johnny Mize 1949-1953  
Phil Niekro 1984-1985  
Herb Pennock 1923-1933  
Phil Rizzuto 1941-1942, 1946-1956
Red Ruffing 1930-1942, 1945-1946  
Babe Ruth 1920-1934  
Enos Slaughter 1954-1959  
Dave Winfield 1981-88, 1990


I think I don't need to say much more than that.  


Just because Wrigley Field has ivey on its walls doesn't make it the Taj Mahal of baseball.  The only reason there is ivey on the walls is because they have to put something there.  Lord knows they don't have the championships or the players to decorate them with.

There is always next year, right Cubbie fans?


Jeff F.

#nowhitebelt

Doug Braunsdorf

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #36 on: September 28, 2005, 12:03:54 AM »

However, Rec Hall did used to hold all the PSU concerts. I saw George Clinton/Parliament give a free concert there in 2002. Also, Genesis played it in 1978 - have a ticket stub from that.


Something about you at a George Clinton/Parliament concert I just can't see...  ;D ;D
"Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear, or a fool from any direction."

Gerry B

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #37 on: September 28, 2005, 02:11:13 AM »
great topic

for those who know what i do for a living - i have had the great fortune of having visited, attended sporting events or produced live events in the vast majority of the major  venues throughout the world. When one chooses their faves- one must factor in the event that one attended as well.

baseball - as good as wrigley is fenway is much more special in my books. I attended the sox home opener this year and sat on the green monster - it does not get any better. Yes Yankee stadium has the history -but being a Red Sox fan it cannot make my list. I also liked the old Tiger Stadium.

nfl football - have never been to lambeau - heard it is the best hands down -of the ones i have visited - the old cleveland stadium and soldier field were pretty great - saw playoff games at both places in january. Soldier Field was also a great place to stage concerts. Also heard great things about Memorial Stadium in Baltimore.

The worst venue besides the domes has to be the Vet in Philly - hands down. Candlestick Park also gets honorable mention as does 3 Rivers , Riverfront, and Fulton County Stadium. The old Foxboro stadium at least had some vibe even though it was a dump.Heard that Mile High was very intense as well as Arrowhead Stadium.

College Football - again many worthy candidates  - of the ones that I have visited:

i am partial to Husky Stadium in Seattle - seen many games there- incredible setting -too bad the team sucks as of late,

Notre dame is also very special.

Doak Campbell stadium in Talahassee brings back fond memories - saw the 1994 FSU -Florida game when FSU came back from 28 down with 11 minutes to play to tie the game. The place was going nuts. Even though the final score was 31-31 -the Florida fans looked like they had bean beaten 62-0.

Have only promoted a concert at Franklin Field - it is an old gem but cannot comment about seeing a football game or the Penn Relays.

Ohio Stadium is high on my list - great place to do a concert as well.

Clemson's Death Valley was very intense

Michie Stadium at West Point is also a great setting


NBA Basketball - The Boston Garden - I also like MSG - I was a Knicks season holder during the 1990's so witnessed some great nights including:  Jordan's 2nd game back after coming out of retirement in 1995 - 55 or 56 points -was a clinic / the 1994 finals game 5 - the famous OJ Car chase game vs the Rockets and  those Pacers -Knicks playoff games -Reggie Miller did rise to the occasion there a few times.Also some great Heat /Knicks games after Riley jumped ship.

College Basketball -there is only one Cameron Indoor Fieldhouse -but Pauley Pavilion during the Wooden era had to be pretty special. Have been inside the Palestra when it was empty -looked pretty neat but have not seen an event there.

Hockey -The old Montreal Forum end of story - the most tradition, most knowledgeable fans and the best hot dogs. The noise at the old Chicago Stadium along with that pipe organ gets honorable mention. Saw one game at the old Olympia in Detroit -but was too young to appreciate it. Nice neighbourhood - not!

Soccer - Wembley Stadium on cup final day - as good as it gets and high marks to Nou Camp in Barcelona -saw a FC Barcelona vs Real Madrid game there - pretty intense. There is a great stadium in London -Craven Cottage -home of Fulham FC -overlooks the Thames river -nice setting. Scariest place had to be the old Millwall football ground on the isle of dogs in the east end of London - if you wore the visitng teams colours you were taking your life in your hands.
Greatest moment -1989 -Anfield -Liverpool's stadium when my beloved Arsenal had to win by 2 goals to win the league cup - scored the clincher in injury time - you have never seen a home crowd silenced like that evening -I did not say a word for fear of death -Nick Hornsby's book Fever Pitch was based upon that game - the US version came later.

Rugby - the old Arms Park in Cardiff was pretty great

Tennis -Wimbledon - hands down

Cricket - Melbourne Cricket Ground or Lords in London

Boxing -Madison Square Garden in the arena category / in the small hall category -has to be the Blue Horizon in Philadelphia and York Hall in Bethnal Green in the east end of London - as good a vibe as one will ever experience. Even though it is not a great venue did get to see Buster Douglas knock out Mike Tyson at the Tokyo Dome in 1990 - what a shocker.

Overall best venue -Madison Square Garden - there is nothing like it - and the old Philadelphia Spectrum had a certain magic as well - great hockey fans, great concert venue and did get to see perhaps the best NCAA tournament game ever played there- Kentucky-Duke in the early 1990's when Laettner hit the shot to send Duke to the final 4. Also saw Kentucky play Arizona at the Maui Invitational at the Lahaina Civic Center -which held 2400 people - over 5000 kentucky fans made the trip

Horse Racing - Churchill Downs

Dog Racing -Walthamstow in East London

F-1 racing - the streets of Monte Carlo -

Track and Field - Letzigrund in Zurich or Hayward Field in Eugene or Franklin Field(so i am told)

Golf -too many for consideration - but ofr histoery / great moments -ANGC / Old Course have to be considered as do Merion / Pebble / Brookline  to name a few







 

Mark_Guiniven

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #38 on: September 28, 2005, 03:25:38 AM »
Motor Racing: Sorry Shivas but it's clearly the Nordschleife.

Soccer: Wembley.

Rugby: Cardiff Arms Park.

ForkaB

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #39 on: September 28, 2005, 03:29:36 AM »
Interesting topic with currency for me as my alma mater (Stanford) is about to demolish its lovely old 90,000 seater WPA semi-underground misshapen (to accommodate a straight 200 yard sprint area on the track) wooden-bench seated self just to build a 50,000 all-comfy seater that will fit the bums and warped expectations of the dot-com gazillionnaires who will fund it and the continuously lowering standards of "football" played by the team (struggle to beat NAVY and then lose to UC-Davis!!!!).  Whew!  Rant over......

Otherwise, most of the best venues are used-to-bes.

--The Old Yankee Stadium when the momuments were actually a part of center field and there was no organ.
--Tied with Fenway.  Yes, Wrigley is just as funky, but as Jeff demonstrated above, baseball has really not ever been played there, just a horrible mutation called cubby-ball...
--The Old Garden (V.3?) for indoor track and field in the 60's, as well as basketball
--Forest Hills for tennis.  Wimbledon without the crass commercialism and with real tennis fans, not just once-a-year poseurs
--Boxing--Lewiston Maine.  Highest hype per minute of real boxing, ever.
--Boxing, honorable mention--Manila, the Jungle.  More civilised and less funky than Maine but better fights.
--College Football, UC Berkley--great stadium, shame about the supporters.......
--Yachting, Larchmont YC during Race Week
--Putting, Himalayas at St.Andrews
--Basketball, the old Boston Garden.  No contest.
--Rock and Roll, the original Fillmore in San Francisco
--Horse Racing, Bay Meadows when the quarter horses were running
--Dog racing, Revere north of Boston ("Here comes Swiiiiiiifffffttttyyyy!")
--Football, gotta be one of those places in South America where they get 150,000 people in and have a moat and razor wire between the spectators and the field.  It's not for nothing that Brazil and Argentina beat up on the Euro wusses every 4 years in the World Cup.....
--Cricket, dozing off in a comfy chair in a venerable golf club with a glass of port in your hands
--Rugby, who cares.......?
--Figure Skating, anywhere Katerina Witt is (is she still alive and still hot?)

As for the question at hand, for significant golf tournaments, it has to be Augusta, if only for the sound which echos over the course when acharge is being made or lost.  For lesser events, it has to be the Dunhill Cup where I'm going to be able to walk around the Old Course with few other spectators to bother me and a chance to see a variety of golfers and great golf course architecture interact, as they should.


wsmorrison

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #40 on: September 28, 2005, 07:37:23 AM »

Basketball: Philadelphia Civic Center.  Wilt Chamberlain, the greatest athlete of all time.  Michael Jordan couldn't hold his jockstrap.

Wayne, come on Wilt and Paul Arizon probably had more big games in Boston Garden then they did in the Civic Center.
 

College Football: Franklin Field.  Take Beaver Stadium and burn it.  No comparison.  Weightman Hall that closes the horseshoe is remarkable architecture as is the entire stadium.

Maybe the third best field in The Ivy League!

College Basketball: The Palestra, hands down the most historic arena in college basketball and the best place to see great games.

I know it is impossible for East Coast people to understand, but yes Pauley Pavilion built in the 60's in California edges out The Palestra. Where is Lynn S?


I appreciate Lynn's comments and still maintain that The Palestra is the best arena for college basketball, by far.  It may not have hosted many NCAA champions, but it had teams that played in a lot of NIT championships when they subordinated the NCAAs.  Philadelphia among other eastern cities is where basketball started and there's nothing like the Big 5 and Drexel for collegiate sports in a single city.  I'm glad Villanova didn't destroy the Big 5.  The history associated with the Palestra is long and storied.  It didn't start in the 1960s but in the 1920s.  It also hosted the first NCAA championship by the way in 1939.



As for Chamberlain vs. Jordan.  Absolutely no contest.  It really is insulting to the record and the man to make any comparison regarding individual basketball talent.  The distance between Chamberlain and Jordan is equal to the distance between Jordan and the next guy.  A mile apart.  

Chamberlain was surely a better all-around athlete as well.  I bet if Chamberlain went out for baseball he'd hit better than .200 in single A ball.  Chamberlain was world-class in track and volley ball as well.

Which other two stadiums in the Ivies do you feel is superior to venerable Franklin Field?  Look, I don't like the astroturf either but it is multi-purpose and it isn't too bad considering it is plastic.  But the architecture of the stadium is world-class, especially Weightman Hall.

You've been in New York to long Sweeney.  Time for a cheesesteak to bring you back to reality  ;)

PThomas

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #41 on: September 28, 2005, 08:11:08 AM »
Wayne -- I think you've been eating too many cheesesteaks ;)

Jordan won more titles than the Stilt

Jordan was a GREAT free throw shooter, Wilt was horrible

Jordan had a great all-around game, while Wilt, I think, was just inside the paint

pt
198 played, only 2 to go!!

Andy Levett

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #42 on: September 28, 2005, 08:16:45 AM »
Okay, the bickering has gone on long enough  :)

The point of this thread was to get discussion going on my theory that golf courses are the most pure form of sporting venue out there, and that they should easily rank with the best and most storied venues in the country.


I'm not a huntin', shootin', fishin' type but I suspect they possess the "most pure form of sporting venue".
Of those where the hand of man is evident to a greater or lesser extent how about adding the  Hahnenkamm in Kitzbuhel and the Cresta Run in St Moritz?
For team sports surely the answer is 'your' stadium (which provides the obvious answer Old Trafford, shame I can't afford to go there anymore, and begs the obvious question of why anyone would pick old Wembley. Glad they knocked it down.)
The other choice that strikes me as absurd is Indianapolis, though no doubt if you went on a motor racing website they'd recommend you go and play golf at Cartball Country Club  :)

Jay Carstens

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Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #43 on: September 28, 2005, 09:14:39 AM »
Don't forget Allen Fieldhouse.  Rock Chalk Jayhawk, go KU!
Play the course as you find it

Kyle Harris

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #44 on: September 28, 2005, 09:20:35 AM »
Andy,

I agree that we are all going to be homers for the most part when it comes to superlative statements regarding "our" stadiums. Beaver Stadium is like that for me, and to a lesser extent, The Vet and Citizen's Bank Park.

Where do our "homer" stadium choices fit in with our favorite golf courses to watch golf or play?

For example, if access wasn't a problem, would you rather see golf at Augusta or playoff baseball at Fenway?

Mike Vegis @ Kiawah

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #45 on: September 28, 2005, 09:24:46 AM »
The Big House is a 14 inch wide seat 110,000 person waiting to be a fire hazard hole in the ground. All the utilities are on the 60th row, the turf was awful and now artificial, and the tailgating is done on the golf course or the other side of Ann Arbor. Hardly in the top ten in the country, let along number 1.

Agree regarding the Shoe at OSU though, with Beaver Stadium at PSU in second. However, Penn State's tailgating is superior since it happens in the two square miles around the stadium.

Neyland Stadium at Tennessee is another favorite, as is Camp Randall.

They play football at State College?  Not after Noverber 19th they won't!  ;) Go Spartans! ;D 8)

Mike_Sweeney

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #46 on: September 28, 2005, 09:36:40 AM »

I'm glad Villanova didn't destroy the Big 5.  

Wayne, they may still play the Big 5 games but the Big 5 was hanging by a thread long before Rollie went to Vegas.  :)


As for Chamberlain vs. Jordan.  Absolutely no contest.  It really is insulting to the record and the man to make any comparison regarding individual basketball talent.  The distance between Chamberlain and Jordan is equal to the distance between Jordan and the next guy.  A mile apart.  

Chamberlain was surely a better all-around athlete as well.  I bet if Chamberlain went out for baseball he'd hit better than .200 in single A ball.  Chamberlain was world-class in track and volley ball as well.

Because of the different eras, it is difficult to compare, I would call it a tie as Jordan had better competition, IMHO

Which other two stadiums in the Ivies do you feel is superior to venerable Franklin Field?  Look, I don't like the astroturf either but it is multi-purpose and it isn't too bad considering it is plastic.  But the architecture of the stadium is world-class, especially Weightman Hall.

No plastic turf at Harvard Sadium or Yale Bowl, and Franklin Field used to have a large number of supporting poles in the site lines.


Mike Benham

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #47 on: September 28, 2005, 10:18:55 AM »
--Horse Racing, Bay Meadows when the quarter horses were running

Quarters haven't run in awhile, the little 9-holer on the inside is long gone and soon, the entire property will be a Transit Center Community ...
"... and I liked the guy ..."

Kyle Harris

Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #48 on: September 28, 2005, 10:28:04 AM »
The Big House is a 14 inch wide seat 110,000 person waiting to be a fire hazard hole in the ground. All the utilities are on the 60th row, the turf was awful and now artificial, and the tailgating is done on the golf course or the other side of Ann Arbor. Hardly in the top ten in the country, let along number 1.

Agree regarding the Shoe at OSU though, with Beaver Stadium at PSU in second. However, Penn State's tailgating is superior since it happens in the two square miles around the stadium.

Neyland Stadium at Tennessee is another favorite, as is Camp Randall.

They play football at State College?  Not after Noverber 19th they won't!  ;) Go Spartans! ;D 8)

Apparently, MSU can't play football in State College.

Last two game scores for PSU v. MSU at State College:
2004: 33-13
2002: 61-7

 ;D

Mike Vegis @ Kiawah

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re:Venues of Sport
« Reply #49 on: September 28, 2005, 03:56:40 PM »
The Big House is a 14 inch wide seat 110,000 person waiting to be a fire hazard hole in the ground. All the utilities are on the 60th row, the turf was awful and now artificial, and the tailgating is done on the golf course or the other side of Ann Arbor. Hardly in the top ten in the country, let along number 1.

Agree regarding the Shoe at OSU though, with Beaver Stadium at PSU in second. However, Penn State's tailgating is superior since it happens in the two square miles around the stadium.

Neyland Stadium at Tennessee is another favorite, as is Camp Randall.

They play football at State College?  Not after Noverber 19th they won't!  ;) Go Spartans! ;D 8)

Apparently, MSU can't play football in State College.

Last two game scores for PSU v. MSU at State College:
2004: 33-13
2002: 61-7

 ;D

Third time's the charm!   8)  Notice the margin of victory getting smaller...

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