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1
Golf Course Architecture / Re: Westlake Golf Course
« Last post by Forrest Richardson on Today at 07:40:43 PM »
I've been to Westlake and thought it was an interesting "In between" course in terms of yardage. Ted Robinson, Sr. was never afraid of "alternative" length courses, and he saw no need to reach any particular yardage. It's a fun course with a robust following. I hit balls at the range with my daughter and some friends just two weeks ago. We waited 30 minutes to get a spot on the artificial pad tee area ó it was packed with no shortage of players. There was also a mobile club repair trailer there, and that speaks volumes on the interest in the course and facility.

Is it the greatest design or maintained course in the area? No. Is it popular, and does it serve a need? Yes. Could it be better? Of course. It's tired and I do not think much has been put back into it. Perhaps some infrastructure and areas of turf removal. Mr, Robinson built solid courses, and they have lasted many years.

When we did Olivas Links and Buenaventura I had eight local courses to visit and "compete" with, at least in my my client's eyes. Westlake was one and I recall my client saying, "It's simple and people like it...so, go see it even if it doesn't seem special." I appreciated that advice.
2
Colin, I think the best way is via his website:  http://andrewgolf.com



3
This is a first under dress code for women.

Women: Collared and non-collared golf shirts, collared sleeveless and racerback golf shirts. Shorts and skorts must be tasteful and be long enough to not see your bottom at any time standing or bending down.
4
Would you hire him to design a course for you? Just asking.
atb

Not after seeing what he did to Chambers Bay.


Or Erin Hills :P


You can blame him for the setup but he wasnít the architect. Being tasked with setting up these courses one specific week a year for the greatest players on earth is no easy feat. Especially when the USGA ethos has been to try to keep the winning score around par.


Tim:


Erin Hills was Davis' personal playpen. All the changes made to its original design and layout -- the lost Dell (which, I didn't think a great version of the type, but nonetheless original to the first design), the neutered blind 17th approach, the advent of all those bunkers -- were done with the intent of hosting a US Open, and Davis ran the USGA (and directed many of the changes) while all that was going on.


But he didnít make the course soft. Mother Nature did that. Erin Hills has a lot of defense, but that got neutered a lot by the June weather in Wisconsin, donít you think?  One might quibble with some setup decisions but the soft turf made the course easy prey.
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Golf Course Architecture / Re: Westlake Golf Course
« Last post by jeffwarne on Today at 07:11:31 PM »
I haven't played the course, but I have walked across it many times en route to my hotel.
Very nice area, and the kind've area that makee me wonder why California gets such a bad rap.(fires aside-which were rampant jsut vbefore the times I was there)
A bit unusual to buy your range balls before your lesson.

I've spent a good bit of time with George Gankas there working on my game and interviewing him several times on my show.
Very fun place, friendly people and a hotbed of jr . golf talent working with George and the other pros there.
They've had to go to restricted flight balls from all his kids launching balls into the freeway 300 plus yards away.
I could've been using a ProV1...


I spenr a bit of time in the area and rotated beteween there, Seoule Park and Rustic Canyon-all very friiendly and high quality golf.
I would definitely return to the area.(a large geographic area)
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Only a Scrooge wouldn't be glad to see someone pursuing what he/she loves. I don't know Mike D at all, but I'm happy for him taking this next step in his working life. But this is a discussion board, and there is Mike D the person and then there's "Mike Davis-USGA" -- championship set-up man, promotor of public venues, and organizational guiding light on all things rules & equipment related. And it's *that* Mike Davis it seems appropriate to discuss here, ie what type are architect might he be? given his past professional decisions, what's his vision for the game and its fields of play, and his ethos and ideals re: design in the current environment?

7
I just read an article by Gary van Sickle declaring a reboot for the rule.
https://www.morningread.com/news-opinion/feature/2020-09-23/these-2-revised-rules-could-use-another-ruling?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Morning+Read+09-24-2020
I like the new ruling. It does speed up play. If there is a culprit it is five inch rough.
Don't like the rule.
Walking back certainly slows the game in competition.(Have yet to play in an event where the 2 stroke local rule is enacted)
Unintended consequences unfortunately rule the day.
It becomes quite slow when a savvy competitor learns not to start the search until all players in his group are available.
Rather than playing their own ball while an individual begins the search, players now wait until all balls are found as 3 minutes goes fast if you begin the search by yourself.
I've had officials deter my caddie(who is out front) from starting a search until all players and caddies arrive, to increase the odds of finding it in the 3 minutes.
previously he would've found it and had the yardage available upon my arrival.
Never heard of that before with 5 minute rule.(time could easily expire if caddy starts search before you arrive-ultimately it slows down play in higher level(no 2 shot drop option)competition by freezing caddie from starting search until help arrives.
IMHO. over the course of a competitive round, it SLOWS play, by delaying the START of a search.
There was way too much other low hanging fruit to go after rather than the 5 minute search rule-if they truly wanted to speed play.
the same thing happened with the 5-minute rule in effect.


The two US Open searches could have been caused by lack of spectators seeing the ball.  Harris English search seemed to be in an open area of high rough where later TV showed ball flight hitting trees.
8
Forrest,
I have always enjoyed Ian's writings (even his Christmas poetry!) and, for me, his extinct golf architecture blog was second to none. I, time and again, pleaded with him and hoped he would distill his "blog" into an architectural thoughts and ideas book. To no avail as it happens but if he reads this you never know his conscience might be pricked and he will set to!! In reality from what he has said on this forum he had other fish to fry and I guess this Stanley Thompson book was one of them. How does on contact Ian now that he is not on a blog or this forum?
Cheers Colin
9
Golf Course Architecture / Re: Ardfin opening finally confirmed...
« Last post by Tony_Muldoon on Today at 05:57:27 PM »
As a matter of interest, if you were slumming it and wanted to see this course, what's the cheapest it would cost you (assuming you're not a rater) ?


Niall


without looking it up, an arm and a ........


As both are slightly essential for golf, I find that this is a temptation I can resist, Oscar. ;)


Good luck to those who are more curious than I am.
10
Would you hire him to design a course for you? Just asking.
atb

Not after seeing what he did to Chambers Bay.


Or Erin Hills :P


You can blame him for the setup but he wasnít the architect. Being tasked with setting up these courses one specific week a year for the greatest players on earth is no easy feat. Especially when the USGA ethos has been to try to keep the winning score around par.


Tim:


Erin Hills was Davis' personal playpen. All the changes made to its original design and layout -- the lost Dell (which, I didn't think a great version of the type, but nonetheless original to the first design), the neutered blind 17th approach, the advent of all those bunkers -- were done with the intent of hosting a US Open, and Davis ran the USGA (and directed many of the changes) while all that was going on.
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