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1
Golf Course Architecture / Re: Overseas memberships
« Last post by Thomas Dai on Today at 02:29:36 PM »
"I know a few that have purposely joined a “Royal” club as an overseas member for it allows entry into the other “Royal” clubs."
Tim M. -
I am an overseas member of a Royal club in Scotland. The club does have reciprocal arrangements with a small number of clubs around the world (both Royal and not). But I am not aware of any blanket arrangement that allows entry into other Royal clubs either in Great Britain or elsewhere.
DT
+1
I’ve been a member of a couple of Royals over the years and am still a member of one. While there are some inter-Royal Club arrangements it is not correct that all Royal clubs have reciprocals with all the others.
It’s also worth noting that there are non-exUk commonwealth/empire clubs with Royal/Real prefix in countries like Denmark, Holland, Belgium, Spain etc.
Atb
2
Golf Course Architecture / Re: Overseas memberships
« Last post by Ian Mackenzie on Today at 02:21:50 PM »
"I know a few that have purposely joined a “Royal” club as an overseas member for it allows entry into the other “Royal” clubs."


Tim M. -

I am an overseas member of a Royal club in Scotland. The club does have reciprocal arrangements with a small number of clubs around the world (both Royal and not). But I am not aware of any blanket arrangement that allows entry into other Royal clubs either in Great Britain or elsewhere.

DT


+1
3
There’s also a possibility that he thought deeply about everything and never bothered to let on. If his intent was to design and build compelling and memorable golf courses then he succeeded.


Sure.  As long as you are clear that is an assumption instead of positing it as fact.
4
Tom,
All this discussion about "templates" etc. came about because of that threat on Pete Dye selling out on PGA West being a copy of TPC at Sawgrass. 


You could at least stick to your own thread with your own questions.
5
Golf Course Architecture / Re: Template Strategies?
« Last post by Peter Pallotta on Today at 02:10:36 PM »
J -
I find it easier to talk about when I use the term 'principle' instead of 'template'. From Tom's Bobby Jones example: he had a fundamental principle, ie avoid the use of purely punitive hazards, and then he had (at least) 4 actualized principles, as outlined in that quote. It's those principles that make for good golf, always; it's how varied and imaginative and original a use of those principles a given architect makes that separate him from other architects


6
Tommy,
Sad to say I have not seen Ballyhack but it on my must play list.  I know you have seen a lot of golf courses.  Are you sure Ballyhack's holes are all original and not patterned in some way off others?  The 3rd for example sure looks like a Redanish par three to me but again I have not played it just seen photos.  The terraced fairway 4th is not that uncommon but again I need to get out to see it.


Mark, three looks like a redan but it does not play like one. The front right of the green plays like a false front. The shot over the bunker is a little bowl. You really need to fly the shot to the section of the green you want, although some shots to the back pins will tend to roll left.


The terrain makes number four different. I don't know anyone who tries to hit the ball to the right fairway. It is narrow. What it does is keep the ball in play on shots from the tee that drift right. It is in essence a safety net. Longer hitters can knock their tee shots over the bump and have their shots roll down. The second shot is to a green is over a waste area to a three tiered green.


7
Golf Course Architecture / Re: Overseas memberships
« Last post by Michael Felton on Today at 01:59:21 PM »
I'm an overseas member at two English clubs. I could likely add a couple more if I were so inclined, but both would be a lot of work. One of the two I am currently a member of has a healthy overseas membership, but as far as I can tell, they're all expats who were full members and then switched. It doesn't seem to me like something they would go out of their way to do. I don't pay a whole lot for either of them, although one of them has just about quadrupled in cost over the past 6-7 years. The club found out that other similar stature clubs around were charging more than they were so they bumped it up. It's still a reasonable deal (not last year's!) and I would keep it even if I didn't think it was reasonable for the possibility that I move back there and want to become a full member again.


Regarding the Royal clubs - are there any in the UK that you can't just play (given the green fee)? I'd think at most you might need a letter from someone saying you're a member somewhere in good standing, but I think most places will let you play with a handicap certificate. There are places like Wisley and Queenwood where that isn't the case, but I didn't think any of them were "Royal" anything.
8
Golf Course Architecture / Re: Overseas memberships
« Last post by Tommy Williamsen on Today at 01:54:37 PM »
"I know a few that have purposely joined a “Royal” club as an overseas member for it allows entry into the other “Royal” clubs."


Tim M. -

I am an overseas member of a Royal club in Scotland. The club does have reciprocal arrangements with a small number of clubs around the world (both Royal and not). But I am not aware of any blanket arrangement that allows entry into other Royal clubs either in Great Britain or elsewhere.

DT


I was an overseas member of Royal North Devon for half a dozen years. The membership is very inexpensive and allows you to play during member tee times and competitions. When I went to other clubs I had them call for me and I received a discounted green fee, whether it was royal or not.
9
There’s also a possibility that he thought deeply about everything and never bothered to let on. If his intent was to design and build compelling and memorable golf courses then he succeeded.

10
I saw the ball roll in but did not see the drop. I thought a rules official was supposed to be monitoring the broadcast. In any case, this is the appropriate rule and interpretations
7.1d(3)/2 – Player Drops Ball Based on Estimate of Where the Ball Last Crossed Edge of Penalty Area That Turns Out to Be the Wrong PointIf the point where a ball last crossed the edge of a penalty area[/color][/url] is not known, a player must use his or her reasonable judgment to determine the reference point.[/size][/color][/font][/size]
[/color]
Under Rule 1.3b(2), the player’s reasonable judgment will be accepted even if that reference point turns out to be wrong. However, there are situations when, before the player has made a stroke[/color][/url], it becomes known that the reference point is wrong and this mistake must be corrected.[/size][/font][/color][/size]For example, in stroke play[/i][/url], it is virtually certain[/i][/url] that a player’s ball is in a red penalty area[/i][/url]. The player, having consulted with the other players in the group, estimates where the ball last crossed the edge of the penalty area[/i][/url]. The player takes lateral relief and drops[/i][/url] a ball in the relief area[/i][/url] based on that reference point.[/size][/size]But before making a stroke at the dropped[/i][/url] ball, one of the players in the group finds the player’s original ball in the penalty area[/i][/url] in a position indicating that the ball last crossed the edge of the penalty area[/i][/url] approximately 20 yards closer to the hole than the reference point the player had estimated.[/size][/size]Because this information became known before the player made a stroke[/i][/url] at the dropped[/i][/url] ball, he or she must correct the error under Rule 14.5 (Correcting Mistake Made in Substituting, Replacing, Dropping or Placing Ball). In doing so, the player must proceed under Rule 17.1 with respect to the correct reference point and may use any relief option under that Rule (see Rule 14.5b(2)).[/size]
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