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Sean_A

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Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB New
« on: October 02, 2015, 05:50:45 AM »
Discretely ensconced at 3700 feet in the North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains, Roaring Gap Club is rarely seen or mentioned. Despite the substantial size and range of activities, the club offers an uncommon friendly and relaxed atmosphere.  The comely proshop, lockerooms and bar are sublimely located near the summit of the golf course where the views toward Pilot Mountain and Winston-Salem are captivating. And of course, the stately Clubhouse, once the Graystone Inn, nearly rivals the course for the position of prime amenity on the property...but of course I neglect to mention the beach  :) .

Long time member Dunlop White III explains the origins of Roaring Gap. 

In 1925, Roaring Gap originated as a corporate venture for Pinehurst, Inc. and Leonard Tufts. Tufts wanted to create a mountain resort away from the summer heat of the Sandhills to serve as an alternative for his mostly northern Pinehurst clientele. Initially, Roaring Gap was referred to as "the Pinehurst of the Hills" and was considered the "legitimate annex of Pinehurst". The Graystone Inn at Roaring Gap was built to function as the summer counterpart to The Carolina Hotel in Pinehurst. In theory, Roaring Gap would help Tufts solidify clientele year-round and stabilize a trained workforce year-round by avoiding off-season pitfalls inherent with an unsteady client-base and employee turn-over. 

Pinehurst, their department heads, staff and clientele simply mobilized operations to the Roaring Gap annually when the season turned. It's no coincidence that the golf course was designed by Donald Ross, and Tufts was the first President of Roaring Gap Club. Ross's good friend Alex Innis served dual roles at Roaring Gap and Pinehurst, along with a host of staff members, including Palmer Maples, and E.G. Fitzgerald, the Manager of both hotels. Unfortunately, the depression made it economically unfeasible to continue with the project and Tufts pulled out. Naturally, a layout so intimately tied to Donald Ross, Leonard Tufts and Pinehurst, Inc. had to be restored and taken seriously — even 90 years later.


Roaring Gap is an exceptional example of the course keeping pace with the views.  This should be no surprise given Donald Ross was the architect.  Ross had an uncanny ability to set his greens in natural locations which afford a combination of beauty and challenge.  Most Ross courses require an element of experience to decipher the greens; at Roaring Gap this task will take more than a casual game or two before a degree of success can be expected.  However, it is the ever-present slopes rather than contours which test our resolve. The newly renovated greens are dramatically expanded to better showcase the effect of the hills on putting and chipping.  The re-introduction of false fronts and high cut lines sweeping up greenside mounds intensifies the challenge. Despite popular opinion formed because of Pinehurst #2’s turtleback greens, the basic outline for many Ross putting surfaces is saddle rather than dome shaped, making it imperative to approach from the correct angle, even at greens where sand isn’t employed.   

In the recent restoration many greens were lowered about a foot back to grade level thus reconnecting the greens with surrounding shaping.  It is quite a remarkable testament to the Green Keeper, Erik Guinther, that with so much work done to the greens it is hardly noticeable.  A clever two year plan was devised by Guinther and architect Kris Spence to create a homogenous look to the greens. The additional sod needed for green expansion on hole 1 was borrowed from the green sod cut from hole 2. The additional sod needed for green expansion on hole 2 would be borrowed from the green sod cut from hole 3…. and so on. Eventually, there wasn’t anything left to borrow. At that point, the sod needed to cover the greens at holes 7, 8 and 9 were taken straight from the 20,000 square foot green nursery. The rationale being that the club didn't want to segregate a green with sods of different maturities, since it may be readily apparent to distinguish "old" native turf from "new" nursery turf, (even if it was germinated from the same core compositions), especially when placed right next to each other on the very same green. In the end, the "old" turf and the "newly germinated" nursery turf proved to be indistinguishable on separate greens.



To the course.  First, because I am likely the only person on the planet that holds this opinion, Roaring Gap is too hilly to take a position among the truly great courses of the world.  During our game we measured the "total climb" (up and down rather than merely a total difference between tee and green) to be approximately 700 feet. Even if an exaggerated number (as crude equipment was used), Roaring Gap is by any definition very hilly.  Assuming that on average, perhaps 20 feet of elevation change per hole is the upper limits of ideal, it is clear Roaring Gap does not conform to convention.  Be that as it may, the elevation changes do present interesting challenges beyond the severity of the walk, most notably on the 11th!   

When entering the property the road cuts the course in two, thus offers alluring vistas across the property.  It is a shock then to step on the first tee. The entire front nine runs through a forested area, it is the back nine which has the more open flavour and views.  The three shot opener isn't onerous if we take what is given.   


The second is a fine one-shotter whose putting surface is obscured...if it looks flat think again.


After seeing the tree-lined tee shot on the 3rd, it is fair to assume that Roaring Gap does not begin in an outstanding fashion.  Legging left and blind, the hole, however, does require thought and precision due to the fairway sliding right and not quite requiring a driver. We get our first taste of Roaring Gap's green enlargement.  What particularly impresses me is the expansiveness of the green line...it runs up the slopes bringing danger and extremely keen hole locations into play.


More to follow.

Ciao
« Last Edit: September 25, 2020, 04:19:05 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Peter Pallotta

Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-3
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2015, 10:03:01 AM »
This is, so far, an exceptionally good tour. I very much like the longer-than-usual introduction. Nice to see you spreading your wings, Sean, both geographically and textually. (Does that make sense?)
Peter



Jay Mickle

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-3
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2015, 04:25:42 PM »
What a wonderful fun course to play. I played there a couple of weeks ago with a group of hickory golfers and look forward to you insightful commentary.
@MickleStix on Instagram
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David_Madison

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-3
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2015, 06:25:50 PM »
Wonderful course - - played there as well last week. I've played RGC before, most recently four years ago, and the changes and improvements were far more extensive than just the greens. I understand that roughly 1000 trees were removed, wonderfully opening up the holes and the vistas. Neat thing about it is that to the uninitiated it doesn't look like any trees were removed, as it was done so naturally and carefully. The first time I really noticed the clearing was after coming up to the bend in #3 fairway and seeing the Greystone Inn in the distance at the end of the 4th hole. The last time I played there, I don't believe that I really noticed the stately clubhouse until we reached the 4th tee. 

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-3 New
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2015, 01:15:21 PM »
Pietro

Cheers. 

David

Yes, a lot of trees have come out, but I don't know much about the areas. 

ROARING GAP CONT

Continuing the steady climb which started with the approach to the first green, the 4th, named Graystone, is dead bang to rights aligned with the clubhouse.  Indeed, for a time, and agreed to reluctantly by Ross, the 4th did serve as the 18th.  By WWII this arrangement ended, presumably because the quaint facilities near the 18th green were constructed.  It is generally the case with Ross greens that staying below the hole is best, but this is most especially the case when playing an uphill hole. 


A scene straight from Leave It To Beaver.


There isn't anything overtly special about the 5th, but looks can be deceiving. This hole tumbles downhill far more aggressively than it would seem...the large left hand bunker in the distance is in play! 


Walking down the 5th one senses that something spectacular is about to be unveiled...an understatement worthy of the finest English gentleman.


The volcano 6th could well be the zenith of Roaring Gap.  Incredible as it may seem, but the petite green is smaller yet due to the false front and false back.  Hitting the green isn't good enough...one must hit the centre of the green with proper ball control. 




More to follow.

Ciao
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 05:58:12 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-6 New
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2015, 04:44:23 AM »
ROARING GAP CONT

The 7th nose dives in a much more obvious manner than the 5th.  The slope of the fairway will kick balls toward the veiled bubbling brook thus placing a premium on accuracy.   


The further we trek down the fairway the more important the brook becomes.  To have a good chance of a par or better, it is paramount to stay left.  Any shot on the right side of the fairway will be met by the derision of a Donald Ross green.  The green looks innocent enough, but the lay of the land drifts downhill left. 


Below is the true nature of the green. Once again, notice the green cut line well up onto the mounds.  The false front too was recaptured during the renovation.


There is a bit of snag on the 8th.  The tee was moved further back, up the hill, making for an unRoss-like awkward walk.  The very brook that hounded us on 7 moves directly into our line.


In this photo taken not far shy of the 9th green, we can see the rowdy personality of the terrain.  The 8th green is to the right. 


More to follow.

Ciao
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 06:04:31 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-11 New
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2015, 06:08:13 AM »
ROARING GAP CONT

As you likely gathered, the 9th heads back uphill toward the proshop.  Its a short par 4 which shouldn't trouble most golfers.  The 10th is yet another hole which plays significantly downhill.  I can't quite figure out how Ross made it feel like we play so many severely downhill holes without incurring grueling climbs. 


The green bleeds into the terrain in an unnoticeable manner.  However, look how the terrain flows down from the right.  When focusing on just the green it is easy to lose sight of the big picture.  The front left bunker is there for a reason...to induce people to consider playing right and leaving a terrible downhill putt or chip. 


We are now entertained by an outrageous Ross hole.  The tee shot for this par 5 is downhill, but blind. Once over the crest of the hill, it is clear the option of laying up will leave a nasty uphill and blind approach from the left.  It is also clear that trying to hold the green with a long second will require some luck and guile. 


No, balls will not remain on this fairway!


More to follow.

Ciao
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 06:10:53 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Matt MacIver

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-11
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2015, 07:50:18 PM »
Thanks Sean, wonderful course, tour and pictures. I played there late this Spring with my hickories and easily kept up with my playing companions due to the rolling fairways and open greens. They don't make them like this anymore.

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-11 New
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2015, 06:26:10 AM »
ROARING GAP CONT

The final hole of Gap's mountainous middle section, the 12th may be the best of the lot.  A Cyclopean shoulder shunts tee shots left toward tree trouble.  The green is perhaps the most dangerous on the course not only because of its 3 to 4 foot back to front drop, but also due to the effortless manner in which the green sets into the land.




Roaring Gap is a design which can be divided into three sections.  While still hilly, holes 1-5 are noted for the corridors of trees.  The 6th signals a transition into the the very hilly section which runs through the 12th. Finally, 13-18, while still displaying plenty of land movement, is much more open in nature, offering pleasing views without sacrificing any of the interest of the previous two segments. 

The short 13th.


Visually, perhaps the most sapless of Gap's holes, the 14th still requires a canny approach to offer a fairly routine par.




More to follow.

Ciao
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 06:17:15 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Bruce Wellmon

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-14
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2015, 04:11:02 PM »
I'm stating the obvious, but, Roaring Gap is a delight.
Coming up on my favorite hole, the 15th and it's spectacular green site.

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-14 New
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2015, 07:26:34 PM »
Bruce

Thats interesting because I think the best 3 hole stretch is 15-17.  The land is not nearly as dramatic as earlier, but the bunkering is more immediately important while the terrain remains interesting.  I am probably an outlier, but 17 is likely my favourite hole. 

Ciao
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 06:17:49 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB 1-14 New
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2015, 06:17:42 AM »
ROARING GAP CONT

15 requires a bit of a walk up the hill, but as on the 8th, this tee allows for a main feature to remain in play. In the case of the 15th it is the centreline bunker in the midst of a fairway as large as the Mediterranean.  With a scant single play under my belt it can be difficult to know for certain, but I think the best place to be is left of the sand even though signals from the tee indicate right is the "obvious" position. 


Hopefully the reason for wanting to stay left is clear in this photo...the green leans left, away from play down the right side of the fairway.


A shortish, but blind second shot par 5, the 16th shares a fairway with the 15th.  There is loads of space to bail left away from the bunkers. 


Once cresting the modest climb, the green is revealed, neatly tucked in a wee dell shy of the road.   


Perhaps my favourite hole, the 17th is not only beautifully situated, but also a devil of a hole even if on the short side.  Most golfers should consider finding any way possible to approach from head on.  Coming in from the left leaves an obscured shot with blind bunkers on the left flank. 




The home hole is a tough as old leather boots par 3.  For a high percentage of players a driver will be required!  This is a most unusual way to end the round, but I grew up on a Ross course with banger short hole to finish so it isn't uncharted water for me.  Notice how the green sits naturally into the terrain.


The modest house doesn't look as though it has changed since built.  People of a certain age who have spent happy childhood holidays at a lake cottage will be immediately transported back in time.  Of course, there are the honour boards on full view.  One can't help but notice Dunlop White's name engraved in wood...more than a few times.  Dunlop is the last person to seek individual accolades, yet he is one of the most deserving. It was his tireless efforts over the course of nearly 15 years which eventually led to the revitalization of Roaring Gap. Without people such as Dunlop, golf could never be the same game we cherish.  His tenacity, knowledge and generous nature are attributes which I am sure will serve the club and golfers for many, many more years. However, just to keep things in perspective, ask Dunlop about one Mr Arthur T Williams  :D


The modest lockeroom.


Having had about two months to reflect on Roaring Gap, I must admit that it is a course which is very easy to admire.  The melange of holes is quite remarkable and that is clear when we review the highlights.  #s 6, 11, 12 and 15 are only similar in their hilly personality.  The 17th is not like anything else at Roaring Gap, perhaps the flattest hole and most obviously manufactured green site on the course, but if I had to choose one hole to top a list this would be it.  Then there is the matter of deciding upon the highlights. Some would mention the 4th, 7th and 16th among their favourites and I am sure others could name yet more standout holes. 

Roaring Gap's hilliness (from a walking perspective) is mitigated somewhat by the modest 6500 yards of total length. Instead of yardage, Ross injected charm, artfulness and fun into the design.  He would have recognized that to build a course of championship length would only serve to heighten the difficulty of the walk and likely result in a slog.  It is a credit to Kris Spense that the course was not lengthened to a magical number of yards to meet championship standards.  No, Roaring Gap is foremost about serving its members, families and friends.  The club reflects this ideal and is in perfect harmony with the course.  1* 2015


Other courses on the Cuatro Tour.

http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,61874.0.html  Mimosa Hills G&CC

http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,61832.0.html  Lonnie Poole

http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,61993.0.html  Raleigh CC

Ciao
« Last Edit: September 25, 2020, 04:31:59 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

David Davis

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB
« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2015, 07:08:58 AM »
Sean,


As always a wonderful tour. It's hard to add or detract from your tours even having just returned from a lovely visit to NC that included Roaring Gap as well. I'm questioning my attention to detail as I didn't even notice Dunlop's name plastered all over the club champion board but in my defense I didn't spend more than a couple minutes in the pro shop. I caught the course on a wonderfully beautiful fall day with the leaves changing everywhere. So much so that it takes real effort to focus on the golf. What a great place. I conquer with your sentiments about the treelined beginning of the course but didn't feel all too claustrophobic. Sure they could perhaps even take down some more trees there but it was very playable once you catch your breath from all the climbing. I cheated a little as my clubs were being driven as I walked up the hill. The only way I could talk my girlfriend into joining me given we arrived from a very early departed drive over from Wade Hampton and I was to visit Old Town later the same day.


I think my favorite holes were indeed the volcano par 3 you perfectly described and the uphill par 4 12th. I agree 16 and 17 were special as well the view around 17 green was pretty amazing.


It's a must visit course if you are in the area and a wild hilly terrain for golf although given my perspective having just come from playing Mountain Top and Wade Hampton in comparison it was just hilly but still very walkable and extremely enjoyable ;-)


NC is indeed extremely fortunate to have knowledgeable passionate golf leaders such as Dunlop caring for the future of it's wonderful assets. I wish there were a lot more like him or at least I could package that and bring it back to NL with me.
Sharing the greatest experiences in golf.

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Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB New
« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2015, 07:25:04 AM »
David

Thank you.  Part of the hilliness problem was we had just played Raleigh CC in high heat and humidity.  Its a hilly course walking in that sort of weather. However, Roaring Gap takes walking a hilly course up a few more levels than Raleigh.  Thankfully, the design and milder temperature make the walk somewhat manageable.  If it was in the August heat/humidity of Raleigh I would never contemplate walking the Gap. 

For any that know Church Stretton...it is hilly, but not nearly as hilly as Roaring Gap...its total yardage is 5000 yards..par 66...so its much more reasonable as are most severely hilly UK courses.  In the UK, Roaring Gap would be considered a monster...so the climbing was a bit of a shock to my system.  Mind you, I didn't see many other people walking, but I am told walking is very common. 

Ciao
« Last Edit: June 19, 2018, 03:21:01 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Lynn_Shackelford

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB
« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2015, 09:58:56 AM »
Sean great review.  I am glad you had the presence to take the picture of Dunlop's many victories.  I saw it, mentioned it to him and also mentioned Arthur T. Williams.  It is amazing that with perseverance he got not one but two very old clubs, that seldom change, to go through restoration.  I agree there is a build up with the final 5 holes presenting a fab finish.  18 could be argued is a bit of a let down, but in match play it probably doesn't matter often and everyone is eager to get to the 19th hole by that time.  Almost makes me wish I was someone with a name like Arthur T. Williams.  Almost.
It must be kept in mind that the elusive charm of the game suffers as soon as any successful method of standardization is allowed to creep in.  A golf course should never pretend to be, nor is intended to be, an infallible tribunal.
               Tom Simpson

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB New
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2015, 04:09:01 AM »
Lynn

Yes, Dunlop deserves many accolades. 

What did you think of 15?

Ciao
« Last Edit: June 19, 2018, 03:21:52 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

Lynn_Shackelford

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2015, 09:15:49 AM »
Only played there once.  As I recall the 15th at first glance was just a long uphill par 4. I didn't think about it much and forgot about it after I played the 16th.  Holes that you don't see elsewhere, like the 16th, grab my attention more. 
I do remember the large bunker and in fact I think my drive ended on the edge of the bunker.  I also recall the green was severely sloped back to front.  But apart from that it might be a hole that lacks drama in appearance but grows to fuller appreciation with more play.


But the 16th does stick in my mind.  I think I hit a 5 iron just over the hill and it rolled all the way down the hill to the edge of the green.  A fun hole that would never get built today due to lawyers and safety concerns.
It must be kept in mind that the elusive charm of the game suffers as soon as any successful method of standardization is allowed to creep in.  A golf course should never pretend to be, nor is intended to be, an infallible tribunal.
               Tom Simpson

Dunlop_White

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB
« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2015, 07:33:47 AM »
Guys, thank you for recognizing it. My honor board days are long gone!

Hole 16 is unique with its blind second shot and its "punchbowl" green as Ross inscribes on his green sketch for the hole. Rare! The Par-5s (as a collection) were recognized in Doak's original Confidential Guide in a list with the best.

Hole 15 is the longest par 4 on the course. The restored version of Hole 15 and 16 feature expansive, merging fairways without any straight tree lines or rough lines dissecting the two — only windswept native grasses enveloping these expansive fields of play. And the two tiered green was doubled in size in 2013 to its original size, shape and dimensions. And yes, the green is canted left toward the large fairway bunker, not with the center axis of the hole. So challenging the bunker will give you the best look at the green.

   
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 07:43:47 AM by Dunlop_White »

Dunlop_White

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2015, 07:41:51 AM »
The golf course naturally reaches its crescendo at the 17th green perched dramatically on the crest of a 2,800 foot bluff with 75 mile scenic vistas across central North Carolina. In the distance, Pilot Mountain, Hanging Rock and the Winston-Salem skyline are etched in the horizon.  Ross designed knobby humps and bumps around the perimeter of the seventeenth green to break-up the flat horizon line visually and to mimic the foothills below. The large serpentine fore-bunker positioned 20 yards shy of the green dictates the strategies of the hole.

And Hole 18 is a giant par 3 -- 240 yards. Some say a par 3 1/2, especially against the prevailing wind. It's a great finisher, because it produces such a wide spectrum of scores. Birdies and doubles are commonplace. In tournament play, the club has seen big swings and big comebacks at 18 generating much excitement.  There are so many fantastic match play holes at Roaring Gap, including 18 and 9, because Ross designed so many half pars. All the par 5s are truly Par 4 1/2s producing an array of scores on each.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 07:44:35 AM by Dunlop_White »

Sean_A

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Re: Cuatro Carolina Courses: ROARING GAP CLUB New
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2015, 05:56:44 AM »
Guys, thank you for recognizing it. My honor board days are long gone!

Hole 16 is unique with its blind second shot and its "punchbowl" green as Ross inscribes on his green sketch for the hole. Rare! The Par-5s (as a collection) were recognized in Doak's original Confidential Guide in a list with the best.

Hole 15 is the longest par 4 on the course. The restored version of Hole 15 and 16 feature expansive, merging fairways without any straight tree lines or rough lines dissecting the two — only windswept native grasses enveloping these expansive fields of play. And the two tiered green was doubled in size in 2013 to its original size, shape and dimensions. And yes, the green is canted left toward the large fairway bunker, not with the center axis of the hole. So challenging the bunker will give you the best look at the green.


Dunlop

It is interesting that I didn't notice a rather large gap in yardage between the 15th at 411 and the shortest par 5 at a very short 461.  I guess for long hitters the long fairway play comes in on the three shotters.  It must be the wild property which helped me switch off to yardage.  Its also interesting that I think the longest par 5 (16th) is for me the easiest green to reach in two.

Ciao
« Last Edit: June 19, 2018, 03:22:57 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2024: Fraserburgh, Ashridge, Kennemer, de Pan, Eindhoven, Hilversumche, Royal Ostend, Alnmouth & Cruden Bay St Olaf

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