News:

This discussion group is best enjoyed using Google Chrome, Firefox or Safari.


Jon Cavalier

  • Karma: +0/-0
Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« on: November 14, 2014, 05:12:31 PM »
For my 250th post on GCA, I hope you'll allow me a bit of self-indulgence.  The course I am posting about -- Eastward Ho! - has been well documented here, and was the subject of an excellent and exhaustive profile by Ran several years ago (viewable here - http://golfclubatlas.com/courses-by-country/usa/eastward-ho/ ) which was replete with great photos of the course.   Many of you have played there, and a variety of photos are available on this site.  In fact, the Club's website has a wonderful course tour of its own. But after playing Eastward Ho this past Sunday, I wanted to do this photo tour if for no other reason than to have it to remind myself what a wonderful experience this place was.

Homeward Bound at Eastward Ho


I was in the general area on Sunday for a round at Wannamoisett at the generous invitation of GCA member Chris DeToro.  On my way up to the course that morning, I noticed that Eastward Ho was a mere 90 minutes further along, and having missed an opportunity to play there a few months back, I decided to try to head over there later that day.  After a very enjoyable round at Wannamoisett, and having been well and duly throttled by both Chris and the course, Chris headed off to Boston and I headed over to Eastward Ho.

Lone Tree at Fifteen


The place is, in a word, wonderful.  I arrived at Eastward Ho at around 2pm on Sunday, and with sunset for Cape Cod creeping up to before 4:30pm, I knew that I had limited time to get a round in.  I also knew I would need to take a cart.  But no matter.  The weather was perfect, and I enjoyed every minute of my time on the property.  I have had the great pleasure and fortune of playing some of the most "charming" golf courses in the east this year -- Myopia Hunt, Garden City, Maidstone, Fishers Island, etc. -- and Eastward Ho, in my opinion, belongs on any list of such courses.  It's an exciting, fun, playable and unique golf course that deserves more than the share of accolates that it currently receives.  I can't remember having such an enjoyable time on a golf course.

I hope you enjoy this tour.

Eastward Ho!
Set in Chatham, Massachusetts, the drive to Eastward Ho takes you through some beautiful countryside.  The anticipation builds as you get closer to the course, and you begin to get glimpses of coves and small bays.  It's a quiet, peaceful area - ideal for golf.

The course was designed by Herbert Fowler and opened for play in 1922.  The course is laid out in a figure 8 routing, with the front 9 on the northeastern side of the clubhouse, and the back 9 to the southwest.  As Ran notes in his profile, the course sits on a glacial moraine, which resulted in some one-off landforms rarely found in the United States.



The Scorecard
The course plays to a par 71 over 6,372 yards - short by today's standards, but as the 71.7/135 rating and slope indicate, the course is no pushover.  I thought the mix of holes and the terrain compensated well for the lack of overall length -- the course played longer for me than the yardage on the card.





Hole 1 - 380 yards - Par 4
Some courses, Maidstone and Fishers Island for example, hide their charms until several holes into the round.  No such wait is required at Eastward Ho!  As soon as you pull into the small parking lot, the first hole and ninth fairway are visible to the right of the gorgeous clubhouse, and you know immediately that you are in for a special round.


Doglegging slightly left, the first plunges down into a valley and then back up the a green at the top of a long hill.


Looking back toward the clubhouse from the first green reveals the tumbling nature of the land.



Hole 2 - 350 yards - Par 4
After crossing a small road to the second tee, the player is confronted with a tee shot over Crows Pond to an elevated fairway and a partially blind landing area.  


After cresting the hill, most players will have only a delicate wedge into a green defended by a banked fairway and collection area to the right and a small but deep bunker short left.


As is so often the case at Eastward Ho, a look back down the fairway from the green shows the astonishing ground features that are present on almost every hole.



Hole 3 - 326 yards - Par 4
Walking across the small road from the 2nd green to the 3rd tee reveals one of the most incredible views that I have ever seen on a golf course.  To the player's left, the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th holes are visible, as is the expansive bay to the right of the 7th green.  The excitement for the player is palpable as he knows that these four holes remain ahead.  


The tee shot on the 3rd is over a valley, and again the landing area is obscured.  This hole is reachable for longer players, and that fact coupled with a blind landing zone make for an exciting combination.


Those that don't go at the green will likely have a half-wedge to a small green that is well-guarded by both bunkers and slopes to all sides but the front.


Looking back up the 3rd fairway from the green - note the tiered decent from the crest of the fairway.



Hole 4 - 182 yards - Par 3
The first par 3 on the course, and perhaps the prettiest, the 4th green hugs the cliff long and right.


The beautiful setting for the 4th green.



Hole 5 - 525 yards - Par 5
The 5th hole at Eastward Ho begins one of the most remarkable series of holes that I've had the privilge of playing.  The terrain over which these hole play is unlike anything I have ever seen before, and the expanse of this section of the golf course is literally breathtaking.


The heaving 5th fairway.


The approach to the 5th green, which sits so close to the 8th green that on first glance, it appears to be a shared green.


The 5th and 8th greens.  The surrounding banks create an amphitheater effect.



Hole 6 - 421 yards - Par 4
The 6th hole at Eastward Ho is one of the most spectacular par 4s in American golf.  Plunging sharply downhill through a valley created by some of the most severely sloping fairways you'll ever see, the 6th plays shorter than its yardage but is far from easy.


The stunning approach to the 6th green requires a shot to a raised green.  Absolutely beautiful.


The view back up the incredible 6th fairway.  Hard to believe that a golf course was built over this land over 90 years ago.


The elevated 6th green sits hard on the water's edge, providing panoramic views of the bay and the small islands in the distance.



Hole 7 - 181 yards - Par 3
The second par 3 at Eastward Ho calls for an uphill shot to a green sloped back to front.  The putting surface is not visible from the tee.


While short is the preferred miss, due to the slope of the green, deep pot bunkers guard the short sides of the green.


Looking back from the elevated 7th green provides one of the best views on the course, with the 7th green, the bay, and Strong Island in the background.



Hole 8 - 348 yards - Par 4
A stiff par 4 running uphill along the bay to the right, three bunkers set into the hillside provide both a target and a hazard off the tee.


The many hazards surrounding the raised 8th green are not visible from short of the fairway bunkers.


The absolutely stunning view from the top of the ridgeline above the 8th green affords views of 6 of the 9 holes on the front.



Hole 9 - 396 yards - Par 4
The 9th meanders downhill back to the clubhouse and toward a green set on a small ridge fronting the clubhouse.  


Framed by the gorgeous clubhouse, the 9th is an excellent green, though the only unoriginal putting surface at Eastward Ho.


The view from behind the 9th green reveals how the fairway rolls seamlessly into the green.



Hole 10 - 208 yards - Par 3
The 10th takes the player around the clubhouse to the southwest side.  The green is benched into the side of a large hill.  Another fine par 3.


Wide view of the 10th green and the clubhouse.



Hole 11 - 485 yards - Par 5
A very short par 5, the 11th appears rather benign off the tee.


But once reaching the crest of the hill, the player is confronted with an abrupt plunge down the roller coaster fairway.  While many players can reach this green in two shots, there is little margin for error as the fairway is bordered closely by trees and vegitation on both sides.


The incredible 11th fairway.



Hole 12 - 333 yards - Par 4
If Eastward Ho has a weak spot, it is to be found at hole 12 and 13.  These two short par 4s are inland and deliver the player to the furthest part of the back 9 to begin the home stretch.  They are fine holes, but they are subtle as compared to the rest of the course.


The short approach to the raised green at 12.


A more gently rolling fairway.



Hole 13 - 336 yards - Par 4
The landing area is blind to the tee at 13 - the green is marked by the aiming post to the left center of the frame below.


The 13th green at the far end of the property, before turning for home.



Hole 14 - 371 yards - Par 4
After finishing 13, the player turns back toward the clubhouse for one of the most spectacular finishing stretches on the east coast.  The 14th plays downhill the entire way to a fairway sloping hard right to left.  A draw off this tee will run forever.


I, unfortunately, did not hit a draw, and so had a short iron into this gorgeous green.  The middle of the 14th fairway is yet another remarkably beautiful spot at Eastward Ho.


As is the 14th green near sunset.



Hole 15 - 153 yards - Par 3
A stunner of a short par 3, the 15th is tucked into a nook along the edge of the bay.




A ridge cuts the 15th green from left to right.


A beautiful setting for golf.





Hole 16 - 380 yards - Par 4
The 16th turns back to the southwest and runs slightly uphill and parallel to the 14th.  


The view from the 16th green back down toward the tee, the 14th and 15th greens, and the bay.



Hole 17 - 537 yards - Par 5
In my opinion the best of the three par 5s at Eastward Ho, the 17th hole begins with a tee shot over a small rise which obscures most of the fairway.


The second shot is over a sharp dip and rise - the green is reachable for longer players if the ball can be carried over the depression in the fairway.  The clubhouse barely peeks over the right shoulder of the green.


The green is built to catch and direct long running approaches that can scale the far wall of the fairway depression . . .


as seen in this shot from behind the 17th green.



Hole 18 - 460 yards - Par 4
The longest par 4 on the course starts simply, with a tee shot through a wide chute to a fairway that appears to bank left toward the clubhouse.  What comes next is ...


. . . simply amazing.  Most tee shots will carry this rise and tumble down to the flat area at the bottom of the fairway, shortening the hole.  Before that, however, the player cresting the 18th fairway is presented with one of the finest views in golf.


The approach on 18 is demanding, as the hill on which the green sits is quite steep, and very close to the gorgeous clubhouse.


Looking back from the 18th green at the fairway and the bay, at sunset, made me happy to be a golfer.



In the end, Eastward Ho was one of the most enjoyable rounds of golf I've ever played.  Being out on this course, alone, as sunset approached on a perfect November afternoon was an amazing experience.  The club staff was very nice and extremely welcoming, the few members that I ran into were most hospitable, and the course was in beautiful condition.  As I made the long slog back to Philadelphia that evening, I continually replayed scenes from the course in my mind.  Although I only spent a few hours there, it is a round I will always remember quite fondly.  

Sunset at Eastward Ho!


Eastward Ho is a unique experience, and I cannot imagine anyone not enjoying this golf course.  
« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 10:17:34 PM by Jon Cavalier »
Golf Photos via
Twitter: @linksgems
Instagram: @linksgems

Scott McWethy

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2014, 05:26:24 PM »
Another incredible thread Jon.  I truly wish you would partner up with some of these clubs and when they put a history book together, they can use your photographs.  They really are phenomenal and as a viewer, I appreciate looking at how these holes look and play.  Thanks again.

Will Lozier

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2014, 05:35:52 PM »
Thanks Jon!  Lovely tour with fantastic pics - color was amazing and they seem to take in the natural surroundings more than most pics on this website do (I liked that). 

I would weigh in with these two thoughts.  I've never played Eastward Ho but 12 looks anything but subtle!  The other thought I had was how much the greensite at the 6th reminds me of that at Bandon Trails 13th.  Cheers

Jon Cavalier

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2014, 05:43:02 PM »
Another incredible thread Jon.  I truly wish you would partner up with some of these clubs and when they put a history book together, they can use your photographs.  They really are phenomenal and as a viewer, I appreciate looking at how these holes look and play.  Thanks again.

Thanks Scott.  I am glad you enjoyed it, and I appreciate your kind words.


Thanks Jon!  Lovely tour with fantastic pics - color was amazing and they seem to take in the natural surroundings more than most pics on this website do (I liked that). 

I would weigh in with these two thoughts.  I've never played Eastward Ho but 12 looks anything but subtle!  The other thought I had was how much the greensite at the 6th reminds me of that at Bandon Trails 13th.  Cheers

Thanks for the comments.  I am glad you enjoyed the photos - its a beautiful place.  As to your comment about 12, its a fair point, as at most courses, the 12th would stand out.  At Eastward Ho, however, it gets a bit lost in the context, as you are inland away from the water and you've just played 11 (and take a look at that fairway).  If nothing else though, 12 and 13 provide a bit of a break from the stunning views and the wildly rolling fairways, and allow the player a breather before the wonderful finishing holes.
Golf Photos via
Twitter: @linksgems
Instagram: @linksgems

Paul Gray

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2014, 06:42:29 PM »
Thanks for the tour, Jon. Exceptional tour.

I apologise in advance for the utter naivety of the question but what's the amazing orange grass? I belief on your side of the pond you have something which is referred to as heather but isn't actually related to the stuff we have over here. Is that what I'm looking at? It looks as if you could actually find a ball in there, much like our stuff, and that it would also provide an appropriate penalty without completely taking a player out of the hole which, again, is much the same as our heather.
In the places where golf cuts through pretension and elitism, it thrives and will continue to thrive because the simple virtues of the game and its attendant culture are allowed to be most apparent. - Tim Gavrich

J_ Crisham

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2014, 07:43:15 PM »
Eastward Ho is not only one of the greatest but most enjoyable courses on the planet. The 1st hole sets the tone- what an opener! The topography is sporty- great speed slots abound. The 10 th is as fun/hard a par 3 as I've seen. Firmly in the top 3 in Massachusetts in my book. Vastly underrated on a national level . Why is Eastward Ho not top 25 USA ?

Stephen Northrup

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2014, 08:22:52 PM »
Having played Eastward Ho! from the gold tees earlier this year, I think the only thing holding the course back from "top 25" status is its lack of length. From the golds, a few too many par-4 holes were of the "drive and pitch" variety, which had I been pitching better might have resulted in a very low score. But the variety of holes and the magnitude of internal elevation changes within the holes were unlike anything I've seen in the U.S. -- even the 5 or 6 "drive and pitch" holes were unlike one another.

Great pix, btw!

K Rafkin

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour New
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2014, 08:37:13 PM »

anyway...

Eastward Ho! is on my shortlist (which is getting fairly long) of US courses i need to see. What an incredible piece of land!  So many great holes on the water.  Im always interested in the holes that dont get to be on the water.  These holes sometimes end up after thoughts, or get sacrificed in one way or another for the holes that get to be on the water, but that doesn't appear to be the case here.

« Last Edit: June 03, 2015, 09:25:28 PM by K Rafkin »

PPallotta

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2014, 09:20:24 PM »
Jon - I can't thank you enough for posting that. Your work is exceptional.

The course looks simply OUTSTANDING!!!

(I don't think I've ever used that word before, and certainly never used it in all caps).

I've been reading the Confidential Guide and have the ratings in my head. Maybe that's why Eastward Ho strikes me as a course where if you missed even one hole you'd be missing something truly special.

Your excellent photography must have something to do with it, but goodness gracious I can't remember ever being so surprised and delighted and taken aback at every single tee, and at every single approach.

Thanks again.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 09:22:05 PM by PPallotta »

Malcolm Mckinnon

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2014, 09:45:34 PM »
Jon,

It is one of the best seaside courses here in the US. I can't think of any other that has such dramatic motion in it's land, almost like angry seas in a perfect storm. The views over Pleasant Bay and the Atlantic are to die for.

My favorite hole is number 6. Too bad the pin was on the upper tier. The lower is much dicier as a short approach rolls way back down the hill while a long approach to the upper tier leaves a put that can easily go off the green and back down the hill as well.

FYI, Geologically all of Cape Cod is glacial Moraine as is all of Long Island, NY.

Thanks for the photos!

Heck, now I may have to come up with something really cool for my upcoming post number 500 and the season here is coming to a close.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 09:54:03 PM by Malcolm Mckinnon »

Jim Nugent

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2014, 10:20:16 PM »
Kyle Harris used to post outstanding photo tours, and now Jon has taken up the mantle. 

Does the course have room to stretch out... is that a good idea or not... and would the club have any interest in looking at that?

John Percival

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2014, 06:34:05 AM »
Jon,
Great pics and very descriptive hole notes.
EH seems like the perfect locale for hickories.
Does the club encourage them or have an event for them?

Thomas Dai

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2014, 07:04:34 AM »
Another absolutely cracking photo tour Jon and what a fabulous looking course Herbert Fowler produced.

It would be interesting to see photos of the course during construction or during an earlier period in it's life.

atb

Bryan Icenhower

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2014, 08:10:17 AM »
I am a hug fan of Eastward Ho! - one of the most under rated courses I have ever played.

Does the course have room to stretch out... is that a good idea or not... and would the club have any interest in looking at that?

IMO - they don't need to.  They do have a bit of land where they could stretch 16 and 18.  Not sure the club's desire, someone with more knowledge may know the specifics.


Hole 6 - 421 yards - Par 4

This picture doesn't do the severe slope enough justice. This layman was amazed they could get seed to stick long enough to grow back in the day with the weather conditions out on the cape. 

Hole 13 - 336 yards - Par 4



They removed thousands of trees when Foster came in, just wish they could remove the trees behind this green.  Can't help but imagine what a great skyline green this was/could be.  There are some sort of regulations precluding removal of tress withing x feet of the water.  Again, there are others that are much better to answer specifics.

Eric Hammerbacher

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2014, 10:26:38 AM »
Jon,
Great pics and very descriptive hole notes.
EH seems like the perfect locale for hickories.
Does the club encourage them or have an event for them?

I believe they have a member event called the Old-School Open where the guys break out the persimmon woods and balata balls.  Not sure about hickories though.

Jon- great photos as usual, you have a knack for making it seem like you are the only one on these courses.  It really adds to the mood of the photos, and it shows that you put a lot of thought into the compositions.
Keep the tours coming!
"All it takes, in truth, for a golfer to attain his happiness is a fence rail to throw his coat on, and a target somewhere over the rise." -John Updike 1994

jeffwarne

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2014, 10:35:34 AM »
Thanks for the tour, Jon. Exceptional tour.

I apologise in advance for the utter naivety of the question but what's the amazing orange grass? I belief on your side of the pond you have something which is referred to as heather but isn't actually related to the stuff we have over here. Is that what I'm looking at? It looks as if you could actually find a ball in there, much like our stuff, and that it would also provide an appropriate penalty without completely taking a player out of the hole which, again, is much the same as our heather.

Peter,
That's called blue stem.
the "orangeness" is due to late fall and a bit of the fantastic fall lighting in the pictures.
Generally is a brown looking plant-Shinnecock is  surrounded by it, and is much more native and durable than the fescue that you see so symetrically surrounding many modern courses .
The Bluestem tends to establish more slowly so it seems to be used less often at newer courses
"Let's slow the damned greens down a bit, not take the character out of them." Tom Doak
"Take their focus off the grass and put it squarely on interesting golf." Don Mahaffey

Jeff Taylor

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2014, 11:40:51 AM »
Besides the golf ball in the 9th green, there is not even a hint of a human being in these images. What more could a photographer want when given a setting like this. The composition of these shots is their strength. I am guessing some of the images are cropped or shot in panoramic mode. Either way, you made excellent choices.
From my monitor these images appear over-saturated, Did you perform any post production changes to color? Are these jpegs straight from the camera?
As for a comment about lack of length, I recently played the TPC course at Avenel Farm. They have a blended set of tees to avoid just that kind of criticism. More courses should consider this approach. 

Tim Martin

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2014, 12:04:20 PM »
Jon-As always you knock it out of the park with your photo tours. For such a wonderful golf course it had one of the worst logos in golf. It is nice to see that someone realized that as it has been completely changed as evidenced by your opening post. Here is the old one from a pullover I bought in 2011.






Paul Gray

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2014, 12:58:51 PM »
Thanks for the tour, Jon. Exceptional tour.

I apologise in advance for the utter naivety of the question but what's the amazing orange grass? I belief on your side of the pond you have something which is referred to as heather but isn't actually related to the stuff we have over here. Is that what I'm looking at? It looks as if you could actually find a ball in there, much like our stuff, and that it would also provide an appropriate penalty without completely taking a player out of the hole which, again, is much the same as our heather.

Peter,
That's called blue stem.
the "orangeness" is due to late fall and a bit of the fantastic fall lighting in the pictures.
Generally is a brown looking plant-Shinnecock is  surrounded by it, and is much more native and durable than the fescue that you see so symetrically surrounding many modern courses .
The Bluestem tends to establish more slowly so it seems to be used less often at newer courses

Jeff,

Thanks for answering my question.

I was struck by the fact that it looks excellent but, most importantly, appears to be very functional. I'm always interested in native grasses or plants that can act in the same way as our UK heather.

Thanks again.

Don't even mind being called Peter!
In the places where golf cuts through pretension and elitism, it thrives and will continue to thrive because the simple virtues of the game and its attendant culture are allowed to be most apparent. - Tim Gavrich

Greg Taylor

Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2014, 04:00:48 PM »
Another great photo tour of a golf course that looks to play...

No issue for me in short par 4's so long as there is a challenge to the tee shot or better short iron to green... or the green itself.

Another "sleeper" that could hold court with the top tier...

Thanks again for posting these pics and the tour!

Pete Lavallee

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2014, 04:18:15 PM »
Golf's Most Beloved Figure played a hickories match against Brad Faxson just after the Keith Foster restoration; perhaps he'll chime in.

Just as Pasatiempo is the planet's longest 6500 yard course, Eastward Ho! Is the longest 6400 yard course I've ever played. It is a true testament to Fowler's routing and use of the wild terrain. Strange that the only other course on Cape Cod to employ this type of glacial terrain is the 9 hole Highland Links. I expect raters can't get past the yardage on the card, but even if this course was neglected it would have so much going for it. The club has righted the Ship and Eastward Ho! now displays the beauty Fowler instilled 92 years ago to perfection.

Thanks Jon for the tour!
"...one inoculated with the virus must swing a golf-club or perish."  Robert Hunter

Ronald Montesano

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #21 on: November 15, 2014, 06:04:40 PM »
12, 13 and 16 are reminders that every pulsating, heart-throbbing experience needs pause.

My life nearly ended on 18...on an evening similar to yours, Jon, I motored down the fairway in the increasing gloaming when I caught a glimpse of a few signs. I slowed down to read them and noted that they directed me to the left. Good thing, or I would have launched off the cliff to the fairway below.

I'm going to call Jon "The Almanac" from now on. Mark, Joe and other photographers on the site know that 90% of the experience is the type of day you catch. Jon has a knack for catching these courses on days of brilliance, which makes the tours that much more remarkable.

Some of the nags on this DG went full-force against photo threads a few years back, which led to the hiatus of many of our lens men. Scratching my head, I think it has been that long since I've put one up.
Maybe for 2022
~Eden Valley
~Hillview
~Pinehurst (NY)
~Kis 'N Greens
~Pine Meadows
~18 Mile Creek
~Greenwood
~Shawnee
~Leroy
~

Jon Cavalier

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #22 on: November 15, 2014, 08:11:50 PM »
Besides the golf ball in the 9th green, there is not even a hint of a human being in these images. What more could a photographer want when given a setting like this. The composition of these shots is their strength. I am guessing some of the images are cropped or shot in panoramic mode. Either way, you made excellent choices.
From my monitor these images appear over-saturated, Did you perform any post production changes to color? Are these jpegs straight from the camera?
As for a comment about lack of length, I recently played the TPC course at Avenel Farm. They have a blended set of tees to avoid just that kind of criticism. More courses should consider this approach. 

Thanks for the comments guys.

Jeff - thanks for the comments. When I'm playing golf and shooting photos, I always try to avoid capturing people in the shots. But on this day at Eastward Ho, I didn't even have to try. The only other players I saw were standing on the first tee, and they let me play right through. I saw no one else on the course for the rest of my round. It was wonderful.

If the pictures look oversaturated on your screen, you're probably talking about the green colors. I do very little post processing of my images - I hate it. I think that effect is probably a combination of the camera (which is extremely sensitive to light) compensating for the late afternoon sun and dusk combined with the Velvia simulation that I was using thay day. But I should note that the course itself was also VERY green, and the light in some spots was gorgeous. The course looked more or less like what you see in the pics - even the orange Blue Stem.
Golf Photos via
Twitter: @linksgems
Instagram: @linksgems

Tommy Williamsen

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #23 on: November 15, 2014, 08:45:18 PM »
I have been asked half a dozen times to play there but it's never worked out.  It just looks remarkable.  Thanks.
Tom Williamsen
Where there is no love, put love; there you will find love.
St. John of the Cross

Jeff Bergeron

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Eastward Ho - An Appreciation and Photo Tour
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2014, 04:58:26 PM »
Thank you Jon! Spectacular!

Tags:
Tags:

An Error Has Occurred!

Call to undefined function theme_linktree()
Back