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Sean_A

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The Quarries of CLEEVE HILL: 2020-21 Winter Tour New
« on: October 01, 2011, 06:42:12 AM »




At 1083 feet Cleeve Hill is the highest point in the Cotswolds with commanding views over nearby Winchcombe to the north, Bishops Cleeve and Wales to the west and Cheltenham some four miles distant to the south.  Indeed, the renowned Cheltenham Gold Cup was first run on Cleeve Hill from 1815 to 1855 before moving to Prestbury Park just north of Cheltenham.  Plenty of horses being exercised are still seen about property.  Covering some 1000 acres, the largely limestone (hence the good drainage) Cleeve Common was cleared of trees about 6000 years ago and is the largest unenclosed wold on the Cotswold escarpment.  The land has been used for farming, grazing and quarrying.  Much of the iconic golden Cotswold stone used for nearby buildings was quarried in and around Cleeve Cloud (a lower summit of Cleeve Hill and the old name of the members’ club attached to the course) and has been for at least two millennia.  It is these quarries which give so many holes their character. 

www.cleevecommon.org.uk


The course seems as if it has been around as long as the quarries, but in fact the original course wasn’t built until 1891.  Old Tom Morris provided the first design, but it is thought only four holes remain, 13 through 16. While all good holes, Cleeve Hill's most iconic hole is the 13th, The Camp. The hole is named so because the green is located on the site of an Iron Age hill fort.  The fort would have been occupied from from around 400BC until the Roman Occupation in 43AD.  See bottom of the map.



The course has already changed by 1913.


The opening hole from the 1913 design....I think.


A photo of what I think is the no longer existing second hole from the 1913 design. The golfers in the distance are walking to a green outside of shot.


A photo of the second showing the green.


One David Brown, an ex-roofer, designer of another Cotswold beauty, Painswick, was in 1891 engaged to “arrange for the preparation and keeping of the greens.”  Mr Brown was famous as the teacher of Queen Victoria and for winning The Open at Musselburgh, his home green, in 1886.  Famously, Brown was pulled off a roofing job to compete in this Open!  Brown later became the professional for Cheltenham GC (wound up in 1935) before his departure to the United States where he would finish second in the 1903 US Open.  Sadly, David Brown went bankrupt in the Wall Street crash and was deported back to Scotland where he died penniless.



The course must have been a bit rough and ready for Braid’s comments after losing a match to Harry Vardon in 1902 were short and sharp; “You get a great view of Cheltenham.” Additional big matches were held in 1905 and 1924.  The international match in 1905 featured Vardon and Taylor against Braid and Herd; all three members of the The Great Triumvirate and the much loved would be fourth member, Sandy Herd.  In 1924 two well known British professionals, Abe Mitchell and George Duncan (recent winner of The Open in 1920) played a match to celebrate the opening of the newly extended course.  As it happens, the 18 year old Alf Padgham was recently hired as the Assistant Professional.  Of course, Mr Padgham went on to become a premier British player, winning The Open at Royal Liverpool in 1936.

It is thought Dr MacKenzie worked on the course and produced new 4, 5, 7 & 9th holes around 1914.  It is unclear to me if any of these holes remain true to Dr Mac's design. However, I must say these holes demonstrate a sense of design skill.  Of course, changes continued. I am not sure when the current iteration was settled upon, but it was not in the too distant past. A hallmark of the design is blind holes, especially tee shots.  The terrain is so hilly that avoiding blind tee shots would have required a degree of construction or long transitions between holes.  As it is, there must be seven blind tee shots, surely too many for any course. However, these somewhat annoying shots are not overly hampered with harsh penalties for inexactitude. 

So, we have quarries, blind tee shots and a knowledge that things come in threes. It may sound very strange for a course with common grazing rights for five farmers to exhibit anything of an exceptional nature, but true it is.  On several occasions it is nothing less than dreamy after cresting a brow; for the greens are one after another exquisitely sited. Second shot courses are often spoken of, but in the case of Cleeve Hill it is nearly as perfect a description of a course as there can be.

A short film from Cookie Jar Golf Podcast.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PRpdtkGhiyk

The card of the course can be deceiving due to its 6083 total yards from the yellow tees. However, upon closer inspection, we note there is only one par 5, resulting in a course par of 69.  Like Woodhall Spa, Cleeve Hill is a rarity among courses in that it is easier to play to one’s handicap by stepping back to the medal tees – measuring 6400 yards to a par of 71. Bruising par 4s from the daily tees, the 4th and 13th are relatively short three-shotters from the back markers. To further complicate matters, the lone yellow tee par 5 comes straight out the gate at #1.  Despite the generous width of Cleeve Hill, positioning is extremely important.


The 1st and 2nd fairways are shared.  In fact, it is quite common to be on the wrong half for both holes.  The uphill 2nd hole turns left and many golfers will experience an approach such as this.


Remarkably, technology has made reaching this green in one a possibility under the right (and rare) conditions.  Consequently, an approach from the high side of the fairway is possible.


Behind the green.


The third continues the blind drive/uphill theme with the approach being a rather rollicking ride.  The green's false front is pronounced and is all the defense this small target requires.  The 4th is a shocker to the senses.  The magnificent setting of the course is fully revealed.  However, all is not as it seems.  The fairway corridor is huge, but for any chance to hit the green most will need to be well left near the 150 boulder.  However, its a slippery slope to being too far left!  Behind the green.


#5 introduces the golfer to the quarries left and rear of the green.  Cleeve Hill is very generous off the tee, indeed too generous in spots, but despite visual evidence to the contrary, this is a far tighter driving hole than it seems.  The golfer needs to position himself to best take advantage of slopes, but gorse awaits for the pulled tee shot.  The wonderful greensite from short right.


The first one shotter, #6 is very fine...as are all the par 3s. 


The 6th with the 5th in the background.


The 7 & 8th were altered sometime after 1990.  I am not sure of the changes, but I suspect it involved moving the holes from the hill right of the current 7th.  That said, due to an outstanding green, it is difficult to imagine the 7th green being new. Playing over a quarry and broken ground, the green sits well down the hill in what appears to be a quarry.  The approach is difficult due to the angled and severely sloped green. To get the best angle one has to make the hole play longer and come in from the left.  A view behind the green from near the 8th tee reveals the sharp false front which covers approximately half the putting surface.


The closing hole for the front nine is a visual delight.  The drive plunges madly down a right to left sloping fairway.  The approach is a bit uphill to a hanging green.  There is a greenside bunker about 5 yards to the right which cuts off the approach from too far right.

View from near 10th tee.


Its been a long time coming, but the second par 3 is worth the wait.  The 10th is one of the new post 1990 holes, a 200 yarder playing down the seam of where two hills meet.  The approach kicks in from the right even though it looks like either side will do. 


The eleventh too is a newish hole running across the valley to yet another raised green.  The design fits beautifully with the existing holes.  A bruiser hole, #12 is long, plays uphill and usually into the wind.  This is one of several drives where large, rugged bunkering would strategically and aesthetically improve the design.  Because 10 & 11 are new, this hole must have played from a different direction, but the current iteration is superb.  The 12th is also an example of some unusually shaped greens.


Cleeve Hill is chocker block full of good holes and it could be the case that 13-16 are the only remaining original holes. The thirteenth is likely to be the one hole folks will remember for a long time.  After another of what seems like endless uphill drives, we pass The Single Beech spotted all that time ago on the 4th tee.  There are memorial plaques in the wall surrounding the tree. 




After passing the tree the hole waddles downhill.  Even if downwind the approach is incredibly demanding. Cheltenham and its famous racecourse lie just below the Cotswold escarpment.  It is here that the famous Cheltenham Festival is held each March.  The biggest prize of the week is the coveted Gold Cup. Less than 15 miles futher south is Painswick Beacon!  Golfers should consider themeselves extremely fortunate to play through such an historical site.

Various photos showing off this outrageous green.  Most folks will end up in a gully with either their second or third.










You guessed it, another blind tee shot awaits on the 14th.  Cleeve Hill is mainly about the excellent green sites.


We now hit a trio of holes which are of such excellence that it makes me ashamed to have waited all these years to visit Cleeve Hill, a mere 45 minutes from my front door.  People simply don't talk about this course!  Like the 6th, 15 plays over a quarry.  The photo was taken from the ladies tee, well in front of the 145 yard men's tee.  I think the club could take better advantage of the quarry if the green were extended to its edge. 


Playing uphill at 185 yards, the 16th ups the anxiety level by several notches. First, a look at the hole from near the 15th tee offers some scale of the property.




Behind the green.


Not to be outdone by the 13th, #17 is an incredible hole.  The blind quarry down the left has to be one of the most harsh, absurd and fanciful blind hazards I have ever come across...and I wouldn't change a thing.  There is a second blind quarry a bit right of the aiming pole.  The green is well below the driving zone and is often blind for the approach. 



Looking toward the green from the left quarry, the 7th is top centre.


Before teeing off on 18, take a moment to read about the area.  This info board is located in the quarry flanking the 17th fairway and behind the 18th tee.




It had to be that 18 couldn't match the previous five holes and that is indeed the case.  Still, this is a good hole which offers a decent chance of a birdie if one can negotiate the gullies striped across the fairway. 




I gush over Cleeve Hill, but it isn't without issues. The conditions are a bit rustic.  Additionally, and more importantly, the course suffers from a dubious bunker scheme.  The powers that be really should consider a complete rethink as to the function they hope the bunkers should serve.  As it is now, the bunkers are near greens when often times the green sites are good enough to be sand free.  It is the driving aspect of the design which needs some bunkering to add interest and variety. 

I do, however, have great admiration for Cleeve Hill and think a good many others would as well.  While #s 13 and 17 are the only All England candidates (mind you that is a damn sight better than many more famous courses), there are many compelling holes and shots.  Cleeve Hill also makes a perfect partner for those other two prizes of the Cotswolds; Painswick and Minch Old.  Dare I say the Stranahan Course at the Players Club would make a fine fourth leg? Regardless, all should make their way to Cleeve Hill and feast on a design which is surprisingly good.  1*  2021

More Cotswold Gems

Minchinhampton Old Course
http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,48765.msg1100536.html#msg1100536

Painswick
http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,51629.msg1181534.html#msg1181534

Stinchcombe Hill
http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,60660.msg1437536.html#msg1437536

Ciao
« Last Edit: May 09, 2022, 05:46:51 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South & Crystal Downs

David Harshbarger

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 6)
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2011, 07:59:59 AM »
Love the green on 1.  Is that like a push up bench as it looks like the green slopes right-left back into the hill.

Also, fom the states, is it common to have sheep and golfers sharing a commons?
The trouble with modern equipment and distance—and I don't see anyone pointing this out—is that it robs from the player's experience. - Mickey Wright

Mike Sweeney

Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 6)
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2011, 09:14:47 AM »
What planet is that on??!! That is really wild. Well done as always and thanks.

Adrian_Stiff

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 6)
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2011, 09:52:09 AM »
Cleeve Cloud is truly beautiful, its pretty close to Painswick and Minchinhampton Old and well worth a little stop off if you like your quirk.
A combination of whats good for golf and good for turf.
The Players Club, Cumberwell Park, The Kendleshire, Oake Manor, Dainton Park, Forest Hills, Erlestoke, St Cleres.
www.theplayersgolfclub.com

Melvyn Morrow

Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 6)
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2011, 11:49:32 AM »

Sean

Cleeve  Hills the home once of Cheltenham Golf Club before its demise and I believe currently the name is owned or associated with Lilley Brook GC which moved away some years ago. Cleeve Cloud GC plays the course now.

The origins of this course was designed in April 1891 by Old Tom Morris. Old Tom arranged for Davie Brown’s brother from Musselburgh to be the Green Keeper.
   
Attached is a reference from The Golfers Guide circa mid 1890’s confirming the information with a photo of the old club house and there is an article in The Scotsman reporting Old Tom’s return from setting up a new 18 Hole Course  on this site dated the 4th May 1891.





Hope that gives you the additional info you require. Just one more small point the Secretary of Cleeve Cloud GC is Richard Salter.

Melvyn


Neil_Crafter

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 10)
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2011, 05:10:25 PM »
Sean
Thanks for the tour. I had seen some old postcards of this course and it looked pretty hilly. Not a bad course to play if you have one leg shorter than the other!

What is little known is that it is another course that Dr Mackenzie consulted to, which might come as a bit of a surprise. And as you mentioned Lilley Brook, which was a new course by Mackenzie post WW1, it is not too big a shock I suppose to learn Mackenzie had altered the original Cheltenham course at Cleeve Hill as well, although his involvement was pre WW1. This is what I have been able to find out:

Not listed by DSH, Hawtree or C&W. The Cheltenham Town GC and the Cheltenham GC both played over the same course at Cleeve Hill. Possibly around 1914 (the club history information is not specific) Dr Mackenzie was paid 10 guineas for surveying the course and providing a plan for further improvements, resulting in the redesign of the current 4th, 5th, 7th and 9th holes. The Cheltenham Town GC later became the Cotswold Hills GC, while the Cheltenham GC closed in 1935. In 1976 the Cotswold Hills GC moved to a new course, leaving the Cleeve Hill GC playing over the old course at Cleeve Hill.

Tom_Doak

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 10)
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2011, 05:22:11 PM »
Sean:

I'm baffled by your three of the seventh green, above.  In the first, you've previously said that you are playing way downhill to the green, but there seems to be a hill rising behind it.  In the second photo, it looks like you are playing markedly UPHILL over the last 30 yards, as you can't see anything over the horizon.

I started to say after looking at your first picture, that I would have put the green up on the little ridge where the sheep are hanging out.  But, after the next picture, I can't tell up from down.

P.S.  You should break up your posts of photos a bit, instead of including them all in one post at the beginning.  I would have included the pictures I referenced, but it was too hard to quote the whole long article and then cut my way back to the bit I wanted!


Sean_A

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 13)
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2011, 06:42:16 PM »
Mike - its Planet Cotswolds.

Ciao
« Last Edit: November 28, 2020, 12:48:48 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South & Crystal Downs

Neil_Crafter

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 13)
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2011, 11:39:57 PM »
Sean
There has been a course on Cleeve Hill for a long time, don't know if it has moved at all though. My suspicion is that it is the same course in the same place that has been used by different clubs that have come and gone.

Adrian_Stiff

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 13)
« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2011, 05:58:32 AM »
Just regarding the history of Cheltenham Golf Club. According to the club history there is nothing to substantiate that Old Tom designed the 1891 course though the clubs history is aware of the fact it was stated in various golf handbooks. The accounts show that no payment was made for design and the club believes that 4 members designed the original 1891 lay out.

Only 4 holes remain from that 1891 route. 13 14 15 and 16. All very good holes.

McKenzie was involved with Cheltenham Golf Club around 1920 I reckon at the time of the founding of Lilleybrook Golf Club, Dr Mac designed this and every hole like Augusta is named after a tree. He made suggestions to improve what we now know as Cleeve Cloud, I think the Cheltenham aspect meant that the Cheltenham golfers wanted to play nearer, Cleeve is a fair way away.

Holes like the 1st are newish, the 2nd has been in and out, these greens look very old but are not. Neil Coles and Brian Huggett advised in the early 70s. The Club was called Cotswold Hills until it moved to its present site, Maurice Little designed that and I have worked with Maurice on some improvement plans for Cotswold Hills. At the time of club moved Cleeve Hill was in danger of going out of buisness, but it kept going and is well regarded by many and is probably only held back by its condition (it has no automatic water system).

The Postcards you see refer to what is now the 18th hole area and the more recent 7th hole which has been abandoned. I have only played the course when the old downhill 7th (back to the clubhouse), the old  uphill 8th has also been lost, these were fine holes but one hole played severely downhill the other returned to an area close to the 6th green, perhaps they were abandoned because of the severe walking. There are some new holes left of what was 10 that Robin Hiseman alerted me too (1990s). These newer holes may be part of a pre war routing and reserected. Hawtrees did this and RH was working for them.


« Last Edit: October 02, 2011, 06:06:38 AM by Adrian_Stiff »
A combination of whats good for golf and good for turf.
The Players Club, Cumberwell Park, The Kendleshire, Oake Manor, Dainton Park, Forest Hills, Erlestoke, St Cleres.
www.theplayersgolfclub.com

Melvyn Morrow

Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 13)
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2011, 06:42:15 AM »

I have read the article that states that Old Tom designed the course but that the author(s) could find no proof to that claim.

Proof is indeed available if one is just to look and starting in the Golfers Guides from 1894-6. Also The Scotsman article published ‘A New English Green’ on the 4th of May 1891 confirming his recent return the week before from laying out an 18 Hole course at Cheltenham.

This information together with some more has been passed onto the Mr I Watkins Secretary of the Gloucestershire Golfing Union.

In the end you have to decide if enough proof has been furnished to complete the history, the choice is yours.

Melvyn

PS MY understanding is that the course has been modified some approx. 3 times, yet I believe it has not moved as Old Tom utilised the quarries as potential hazards.

Adrian_Stiff

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 13)
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2011, 07:31:21 AM »
Im not sure Melvyn. I was actually with Ian Watkins on Friday shame this never came up before though Ian would know less than me since he did not come to Gloucestershire before 1977. I do have an early routing and there were a lot of short holes in those early days that are not there now, it might be a great excercise to try and find the old green and tee pads, that land is still pretty much just grassed. The trouble with old handbooks is it is very easy that they have published incorrect information and very easy to believe it as time passes since no one is around to disagree. Maurice Little who is probably 80 now would be the best source of info, if I bump into him I will ask him. What I am certain of is very little remains from that early routing so it aint no Old Tom now. The 15th is the quarry hole and that is still there. Sean will shortly be posting a pic.
A combination of whats good for golf and good for turf.
The Players Club, Cumberwell Park, The Kendleshire, Oake Manor, Dainton Park, Forest Hills, Erlestoke, St Cleres.
www.theplayersgolfclub.com

Melvyn Morrow

Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 13)
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2011, 01:53:40 PM »
Adrian

First we have the rumour that Old Tom was involved, but later generations can't find any information. Yet it’s interesting that this statement was issued in the last few years re OTM and no proof.

The Golfers Guide has been rather realisable to date, albeit published 4 years after the event. Yet we have the newspaper article clearly stating his return from Cheltenham in April 1891 the month after the club was formed. Also interesting is the comment about Davie Brown's brother being the Green Keeper.

So we have three things putting OTM at Cheltenham, two in writing and one printed a few days after his return. As for any holes left, I just do not know.

Had it just been the rumour then there are grounds to dismiss it out of hand but two separate reports one published at the time in a National newspaper, make it more believable. But as I said you can take it or leave it.

Melvyn



Mark_Rowlinson

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (1 thru 13)
« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2011, 03:54:54 PM »
Sean, You are becoming a classic golf writer/photographer. You are very good. I think we should meet up at Holywell in North Wales, very similar in many ways to this course. Your trip should also take in Bull Bay if you haven't yet been there and we'll throw in Conwy to test out your handicap. Mark.

John Mayhugh

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2011, 10:25:45 PM »
Thanks for the tour Sean.  Amazing that you're still discovering courses like this. Hopefully you will be up for a return visit next time I'm in the area. Can't come soon enough.

Nice looking set of par 3s.  How long is the 6th?

Colin Macqueen

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2011, 10:50:17 PM »
Sean,

Nice read...... verging on Darwinian!    Now I understand that quarries abound but nonetheless this course seems to have fewer bunkers (no bad thing!) than I have ever seen on a golf course. Is that actually the case or are you shots not revealing their extent?

Cheers Colin.
"Golf, thou art a gentle sprite, I owe thee much"
The Hielander

Robin_Hiseman

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2011, 03:58:30 AM »
Sean

I'm glad that you finally made it up to Cleeve Hill and got such a belter of a day to boot.  I've always enjoyed knocking it around up there although it can be maddeningly difficult to score on as it is usually hard and dry, which coupled with the severe contour makes it extremely tricky (but fun) to keep the ball on track.  Your pictures do a fine job of showing it off, but one really has to be there to fully appreciate the sensational views.

We were recently asked by a leading golf magazine to recommend the British courses with the best views.  I proposed Cleeve Hill, amongst others, but they rejected it. I suggest that if the editor of that magazine had been prepared to do adequate research for their feature, that Cleeve Hill would be a shoe in for one the best views in British golf....unless you know different.
2022: Al Mouj; Cleeve Hill, Painswick, Minch Old, Weybrook Park, The Astbury, Silloth, Royal Balfron, Strathendrick, Archerfield (Fidra), The Roxburghe, Stoneham, Woburn (Marquess), JCB
Coming Up: Hayling, Dunes Club, The Loop, Arcadia Bluffs (South), Crystal Downs, St. Patrick's

Sean_A

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2011, 03:16:19 PM »
Neil - the website mentions the original course being at the lower slopes of Cleeve Hill so much of what now exists can't be original.

Mark - thanks for the kind words.

Colin - the course probably has less than 20 bunkers.  In truth, if a proper archie was brought in to create a new bunker scheme Cleeve Hill could be an outstanding course. 

Tucky - the 6th is about a buck 25. 

Doc- Cleeve Hill is without doubt one of the prettiest courses I have ever seen.

Ciao

 
« Last Edit: May 30, 2018, 08:47:03 PM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South & Crystal Downs

PPallotta

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2011, 03:28:32 PM »
Sean - thanks.  A career as a wrter (low-paying but emotionally rewarding) awaits you!

Cleeve's £ spent per prettiest view ration is outstanding - not that I'm so superficial as to notice that or suggest it as a ranking system.

Peter


Tony_Muldoon

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2011, 04:27:54 PM »

  One can see that Cleeve Hill is very generous off the tee, indeed too generous.  Still, the golfer needs to position himself to best take advantage of slopes, but it is hard to know how to do that on the first play.



Mighty fine tour, thanks Sean. 


Robin have you ever played Clyne,?  The overall look and a few of the holes brought it to mind?


Re the quote above I’ve often wondered how enduring the appeal of Quirk can be.   Once you figure out the lines needed to have the ground feed your ball where you want it, is half the fun gone?  Sadly Cleeve will be a play and run stop for me, but one I hope to do sooner rather than later.



on 29th May I am riding 100 Miles to help raise funds for Dementia Research. All donations are welcome.
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ridelondon-tonymuldoon

Anthony Gray

Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2011, 05:01:05 PM »


  Golf as was it was ment to be....fun.


  Anthony


Adrian_Stiff

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2011, 05:18:15 PM »
We have some 4 bed cottages and a 12 bedder in the middle of those courses. I reckon I can do 2 nights accomadation and 4 rounds of golf, Cleeve Cloud, Painswick, Minch Old and The Stranahan for £129. "The Cotswold Quirk" think I will try that for next year. Painswick and Minch are only about 15 minutes apart.
A combination of whats good for golf and good for turf.
The Players Club, Cumberwell Park, The Kendleshire, Oake Manor, Dainton Park, Forest Hills, Erlestoke, St Cleres.
www.theplayersgolfclub.com

Sean_A

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD (finito)
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2011, 02:04:52 AM »
Sean - thanks.  A career as a wrter (low-paying but emotionally rewarding) awaits you!

Cleeve's £ spent per prettiest view ration is outstanding - not that I'm so superficial as to notice that or suggest it as a ranking system.

Peter



Pietro

I understand the low pay, but not as a writer.

Spangles

That is an interesting idea about diminishing returns on quirk (presumably gravity golf quirk?).  Do you have experience with this from another course?

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South & Crystal Downs

Robin_Hiseman

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2011, 04:06:52 AM »
Adrian:  Sign me up for the 'Cotswold Quirk'!  That would be a great couple of days.  Hawtree may have worked on Cleeve Hill but it would have been before my time.  We didn't do anything between 91-96 when I was there.  I'd be interested to join you at CH to do a bit of archaeology and see if we can root out those old holes.  I didn't play those holes up and down the hill you mention, so would like to see those too.

Tony:  Not played Clyne, but walked a coupe of holes with you last year at BUDA.
2022: Al Mouj; Cleeve Hill, Painswick, Minch Old, Weybrook Park, The Astbury, Silloth, Royal Balfron, Strathendrick, Archerfield (Fidra), The Roxburghe, Stoneham, Woburn (Marquess), JCB
Coming Up: Hayling, Dunes Club, The Loop, Arcadia Bluffs (South), Crystal Downs, St. Patrick's

Mark Pearce

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Re: The Quarries of CLEEVE CLOUD
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2011, 04:43:54 AM »
I'm another who'd be up for Cotswold Quirk!
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

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