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Sean_A

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Superior ST GEORGES HILL GC New
« on: August 22, 2008, 07:50:38 PM »
Few clubhouses have the presence of St George's Hill.  Like the logo, the clubhouse strikes me as a bit ott, but it is very comfortable and provides a great viewing point for the 1st, 9th & 10th tees, plus the 9th & 18th greens.




St Georges Hill may best be known in history by its association with the Diggers.  During the turbulent period shortly after the trial and execution of King Charles I, a group led by Gerrard Winstanley occupied the common land known as St Georges Hill with a view to cultivating it. This radical solution to rising food prices and a general feeling of disconnect with the land among the lower classes would 200 years later be labeled  Communism.  How ironic then that St Georges Hill should eventually become one of the wealthiest gated communities in England. 

In 1911 the concept of a gated community was relatively novel and appealed to the then well established middle classes made up of professionals and entrepreneurs.  It is the great fortune of golfers that the developer, George Tarrant (he also developed Wentworth), decided to include a golf course on the Surrey estate. A well known figure in the Arts & Crafts movement, Tarrant is also associated with Hook Heath, the estate near Woking GC. He designed a few houses prior to the St George's Hill development. Interestingly, after a well publized 1924 match between Hagen/Smith and Duncan/Mitchell Mr Tarrant came up with idea of a providing a trophy for an annual match between between professionals from the USA and England.  The St Georges committee turned the idea down thus leaving the door open for Wentworth to carry the idea forward.  One of the spectators of the Wentworth Match was Samuel Ryder.  Ryder thought the match should be staged again (no doubt encouraged by two English victories) and thus the Ryder Cup was born in 1927, being first played at Worcester CC in Massachusetts. 

After many months of arduous tree-clearing Harry Colt was able to embark on what is arguably his finest inland creation.  The course covers land which is most obviously severe even when viewed from the comfort of the rather redoubtable clubhouse.   However, the undulating terrain is used to great effect in offering challenge and beauty.  True to Colt, many of the holes play to somewhat large uphill greens situated on plateaux and well guarded by sand.  Colt is rightly famous for his par 3s, but I think the strength of St Georges Hill rests with its two-shotters. The diversity of these holes sets the standard for Colt and perhaps for all of the great architects of the Golden Age.               

One of the aspects of St Georges Hill which impresses me the most is its width.  Oddly enough, perhaps #1 is the most confined hole on the course!  One will note the up and down nature of the opener, this is a common theme throughout. 


The far right bunker looks out of sorts.  It is a remnant of when the green was further right.


Like most good uphill approaches, the shot here leaves the player in some doubt as to where the edge of the green is; in this case, the left side. This doubt makes it difficult to be aggressive with left side hole locations.


But there is more room for error than it appears.


The second takes the player blindly over a brow with a ditch some 300 yards out.  Below is a look at the hole from a forward location.


The approach. 


A tricky two tier green short hole, the most difficult hole location to access is on the right, but once on the 3rd green the more challenging putting will be down the tiers to the left side of the green.  The bunkering was recently altered as there is now one large bunker on the left rather than two smaller ones.


The 4th stands out as the awkward hole at St Georges Hill.  The hole may be more interesting from the ladies tees at ~245 yards.  The yardage is often not enough for driver, but still requires at least a 220 yard carry if one is going for the green.  The apron is very deceiving as it is steeply uphill.


#5 is an awkward length as well because of the cross bunker.  The seemless transition from fairway to green makes this uphill approach much more tricky than first glance suggests. 


An odd shaped hole, the 6th fairway protrudes well right. 


The recent bunker work has made the bunkering scheme better aligned with the texture of the property.  The course now feels more of a heathland than previously. The bunker below is fed by the surrounding land.  It is also clear that one can draw a rather unpleasant heathery lie just outside the hazard.


There is a sleek swale shy of the green which visually forshortens the hole.  Playing downhill as well, it is wise to take one club less than the yardage suggests, but many take one more....


A very short par 5, one can have a mid iron to the 7th green.  This seems to be the one hole which doesn't quite settle with me.  Next is the stunning 8th. Though it must be said that once one sees photos of the old bunkering compared  to the current disjointed effort, it must bring a tear to the eyes of Colt fans.  Let us hope the club restores this hole to its Colt heritage which should include restoring the lower right green which may not have survived for the opening of the course! Many greens were altered in the 1920s. In fact, I believe all the greens were altered around the same time, sometimes to soften the slopes and contours. Interesting fact, Ringo Star used to live in a house called Sunny Heights to the right of the 8th.






The course is chocker block full of plateaux greens and knob to knob shots.  On a few occasions, the greens are turtle backed. 


The somewhat blind 9th swings hard left and uphill to a green which runs treacherously left. 


Back in the day.


The approach.




The back nine commences in stunning fashion with a blind longish two-shotter over the brow of a hill.  The hole feels like a dogleg left, but actually plays like a dogleg right because of the severe terrain. The large green dictates the approach.  If the hole is left behind the mound then far right is the ideal driving line.  Otherwise, down the middle works.  Anything less than a superb approach leaves the golfer in three putt territory. A clever mirror system offers a view of the golfers ahead.


What remains after a very good drive.


The 10th is a very good green amongst an engaging if not overly aggressive set of putting surfaces.  It is a great shame some of the greens were softened over time, sometimes by Colt himself.  With the exception of Woking, the London heathland greens are open to criticism for their leaning toward the bland when compared with similarly highly respected courses in the US.  Looking back to the tee.


Another thorny distance hole of some 110 yards, the 11th can leave golfers stumbling and bumbling.


The plateau for the green site is actually quite large.  It would be interesting to know why Colt chose not to use the entire feature in showcasing an unusual green for a short hole.


The 12th is another blind drive, but the splendor of the hole is soon exposed.  There are two radically different tees which make the hole either straight or a legger right.


Another domed green disguised wonderfully by the front left bunker.  Just look at how perfectly the green sits on the knob!


#13 is perhaps the most inviting tee shot on the course. 


If this bunker was set diagonally the grass line wouldn't be nearly as stark.


Approaches such as this were a penchant of Colt.  He seemed to slip in this concept of several bunkers following a diagonal line quite a bit. The left bunker was recently removed which has somewhat reduced the string of pearls effect.


I think this is a new bunker...being flatter, its very much in the New Zealand style.


A rather odd short hole over water, it would seem that Colt tried his best not to get water properly into play on the 14th.  All the same, this is a good hole because of the green.  #15 is a straightaway par 5 with a slight drop and turn in the fairway out near the driving zone.  Cleverly placed bunkers short left of the green attract aggressive shots which fail to stay on the correct line.  Even if one bangs one between the sand, the contours will take the shot well left. 


The tough 16th follows the same direction as 15 and features the string of pearls bunkering. 






The great variety of the back nine continues with the 17th.  Colt took advantage of the bold terrain incredibly well on the back nine and the use of the ridge is an example of this.  Because of kicks left off the ridge, this fairway plays much narrower than it looks!


The approach.


This green has been extended to the left in the recent past.  There is now a great hole location on the left just before the sudden drop.


#18 is a fun finisher.  Again, great use of the land to push tee shots away from the ideal approach angle.


After turning the corner this cracking view of the green opens up.


Not long, but depending on the lie and angle, this can be a tricky approach.  This angle is common.  Remember the horrible slope on the 18th green? The safe bail-out shot right leaves that nasty down-hill putt.


St Georges Hill is well worth a visit simply to see the par 4s...the variety is outstanding.  The great use of the topography sets off what is surely one of the best back nines in England which is kick started by the alarmingly excellent 10th.  Finally, the appropriate width of the course and well maintained tree areas ensures the design can be fully enjoyed and appreciated.  For those interested in history the house is worth strolling around.  A standout feature is the uniquely displayed "board" winners on corner columns.  Anybody going to London should seriously consider St Georges Hill as one of the first ports of call.  1*  2018





Ciao
« Last Edit: February 02, 2022, 04:20:12 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies & Crystal Downs

Paul_Turner

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2008, 08:01:57 PM »
Thanks Sean

I can't believe what's happened to the bunkering at SGH it looks like someone upholstered them! 

And the 3rd does slide from right to left.  There's right to left a tier in it, no?
can't get to heaven with a three chord song

Mark Bourgeois

Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2008, 08:04:15 PM »
Thanks for the pics, Sean.  Can't say if it's true through and through, but bunkers for which old pictures exist do not look like those of today.

Also, I liked 4 Red!  Not my favorite by any stretch, but if you are not going to go for it, the hole location relative to the centerline of the hole will determine where to place your tee shot, which I thought was kind of cool.  It does sound like they moved up the tees to give PG an unfair advantage...

Did you play with a member? He / she would have been able to tell you which famous person lived in those houses!  That monstrosity left of the 4 Blue green is owned by somebody famous (or infamous) to you Brits, I think.

Mark

Sean_A

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2008, 08:13:33 PM »
Thanks Sean

I can't believe what's happened to the bunkering at SGH it looks like someone upholstered them! 

And the 3rd does slide from right to left.  There's right to left a tier in it, no?

Paul

The 3rd does move a bit right to left, but very little.  Its more of a two tier green.   
Mark

I played with the African Animal.

Comfortably the biggest house I saw out there to the left of #12 (I am not having this nonsense of three nines - the Green is the odd nine so far as I am concerned!).

Ciao
« Last Edit: August 06, 2018, 04:32:32 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies & Crystal Downs

Bill_McBride

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2008, 08:25:52 PM »
Was the AA hitting those immense tee shots?  One of my favorite golf memories is playing a foursome with him at Muirfield.  We both hit approach shots from places we weren't accustomed to playing from!  ::)

JMorgan

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2008, 08:39:06 PM »
Lousy scan of #1 during tree clearing (from Some Essays on GCA):


Jim Nugent

Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2008, 03:12:20 AM »
Great review and pictures, Sean.

1.  Why did you play the ladies tees on some holes: were you forced to?  If you'd played further back, would that have made those holes better?   

2.  What are greens fees?

3.  Are the AA's initials PG? 

Paul Nash

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2008, 04:55:15 AM »
Sean
I played another 36 holes at SGH this April and agree with you that the back 9 is far superior to the front 9 - although 6, 8 and 9 are very nice. The ground on the front 9 is not very sandy at all - it feels more clay like, but the back 9 has a much more heathland/ sandy soil. The clubhouse is very nice with a great vista over the course.

This was the second trip that I had arranged and it is excellent value in the off season, which extends beyond the reduced rates at most other clubs, into the second half of April - we payed 76 for 36 holes, bacon and coffe on arrival and a soup/ sandwich lunch - and unlike some other "posh" clubs in the area, the experience from members and staff at the club has been excellent - and a big plus point is their starter who is a real star. I would definitely go back for another trip at 76, but not at their summer rates, which are nearly double the price. All told a nice course with some great holes but also a few average ones - not quite as good as The Berkshire, Swinley, Worplesdon and, esepcially not Hankley.

Sean_A

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2008, 05:52:52 AM »
Great review and pictures, Sean.

1.  Why did you play the ladies tees on some holes: were you forced to?  If you'd played further back, would that have made those holes better?   

2.  What are greens fees?

3.  Are the AA's initials PG? 

Jim

We played the yellows and some were moved forward.  Its hard to say if #s 4 & 5 are better from any other tee.  I can say that the tees we played from are probably quite awkward for many high single digit players because one can't comfortably take driver and swing away.  I would guess that we probably played the course at 6000/6100 yards today.  I think the normal yellows are more like 6300, but the differences were mostly obvious on a few holes.  As I said before, #s 4 & 5 were forward making what I think is a big difference and for me I think it would have been easier to step back.  On #7 it may have been a clever move to push the tees forward because the left bunker on the hill (not pictured) is much more in play than from the normal tees.  It becomes a real risk/reward to try and carry that bunker and have a short iron in plus the angle.  If you layup or can't make the carry you must play right and accept the choice of a bad angle in over the bunkers (as shown in the pic, but from further back) or laying out the left on the second.  All in all, I don't think any of these three major tee changes (shortening the course by ~125 yards, maybe more) made the course any easier. 

I think the green fees are 110 for 18 holes and AA is PG.

Hopefully Philip will chip with his thoughts and pix.  I know he has a good eye, more patience waiting for the right light and a superior camera. 

Ciao
« Last Edit: August 23, 2008, 05:54:33 AM by Sean Arble »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies & Crystal Downs

Paul_Turner

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2008, 07:48:44 AM »
Has the pond on 14 been changed, anyone know?  That second bunker on the left for the 5th tee shot has been added recently too,  it looks a bit busier.

I agree the back nine is better, but really only because the 7th is the weakest hole on the course, I reckon the rest are about even in quality and the 1st is the best opener on the heath, a fitting spectacular start.  Incidentally,  the original green for the 1st was up on that knob to the right (by the sign) but was moved in the 1920s (deemed too severe). 

I'd like to know from others who play the 4th regularly on how they approach that hole.

There is a super collection of old photos in the clubhouse. If only someone could do a proper bunker restoration (for 1913 centenary??) so they match the grand scale of the course.

On the positive side, the clearing out of brush from under the pines, looks great, perhaps the heather will regrow?

St George's Hill was one of the very first big construction jobs,  you can see how much had to be cleared from the pics James posted.  When did Crump travel over to the Uk?  If it was 1912 he would have seen this course in that  building stage, H Wilson too.

It looks very green.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2008, 07:51:48 AM by Paul_Turner »
can't get to heaven with a three chord song

Sean_A

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2008, 08:06:02 AM »
Has the pond on 14 been changed, anyone know?  That second bunker on the left for the 5th tee shot has been added recently too,  it looks a bit busier.

I agree the back nine is better, but really only because the 7th is the weakest hole on the course, I reckon the rest are about even in quality and the 1st is the best opener on the heath, a fitting spectacular start.  Incidentally,  the original green for the 1st was up on that knob to the right (by the sign) but was moved in the 1920s (deemed too severe).  

I'd like to know from others who play the 4th regularly on how they approach that hole.

There is a super collection of old photos in the clubhouse. If only someone could do a proper bunker restoration (for 1913 centenary??) so they match the grand scale of the course.

On the positive side, the clearing out of brush from under the pines, looks great, perhaps the heather will regrow?

St George's Hill was one of the very first big construction jobs,  you can see how much had to be cleared from the pics James posted.  When did Crump travel over to the Uk?  If it was 1912 he would have seen this course in that  building stage, H Wilson too.

It looks very green.

It looked to me like the left bunker on #5 was new and that the shape/position of the right bunker may have been slightly altered.  I know bunker work has taken place recently.  

I don't think #7 is weak at all.  I , just a bit indifferent.  Speaking of #7, I know the bunker about 50 yards short of the green has been worked on as well.  

#1 is a very good starter and perhaps the best hole on the front side, but it is no match for #10 - just a great, great hole.  

I think the par 3s on the front take the cake compared to the back, but that is about all I would give the edge to the front in.  

There is no question that the treed areas have been looked after very well.  Nearly every other heathland course could learn a great lesson here.  This clearing out contributes greatly to the width of the course and thus the enjoyment of playing.  There is loads of heather about, but much of it is not really in play.  The heather really isn't used strategically like on other courses such as New Zealand and Worplesdon.  

The course is very green and slightly soft.  As I said, it feels like a parkland course with heather on it rather than a heathland course.  Mind you, the weather we have had this summer makes it a bit unreasonable to make final judgements as to how the course normally would play.  It has been awfully wet!

Ciao
« Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 09:25:52 PM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies & Crystal Downs

John Kirk

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2008, 08:57:07 AM »
Sean,

For your informtaion, the photo for hole #14 is not presented, because the bracketed image indicator is burdened with an extra 'g', as in [imgg].

I agree that the bunker presentation is inconsistent, especially in the middle of the front nine.

Thanks for a lovely tour.  Nice park.

Mark Bourgeois

Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2008, 09:31:16 AM »

Mark Bourgeois

Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2008, 09:47:06 AM »
Sean if you don't mind I will chime in with a few more pics.

Looking beyond 8 green to 8 tee:



The 10th is an Alps hole, and an excellent one at that. Looking back up the 10th hole:



A look at 12 from front of the tee:



I played the back tees -- Sean, it's clear you got jobbed!  13 from the back tee:



I will echo Sean's comments re the clubhouse -- that it served as a hospital in WWI says it all!

Mark
« Last Edit: August 23, 2008, 10:49:39 AM by Mark Bourgeois »

fred ruttenberg

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2008, 10:19:46 AM »
I am going to London in early September and planning to play SGH.  Is it worthwhile to play the Green nine also?  From earlier posts it seems that it should be avoided.

Mark Bourgeois

Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2008, 10:52:37 AM »
Fred

That's the members' nine. The first two holes are the only justification to play it. Personally, I would rather go around either of the other nines a second time. Mark

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2008, 11:02:14 AM »
Sean,

For your informtaion, the photo for hole #14 is not presented, because the bracketed image indicator is burdened with an extra 'g', as in [imgg]http://.

I agree that the bunker presentation is inconsistent, especially in the middle of the front nine.

Thanks for a lovely tour.  Nice park.

Delete
« Last Edit: March 10, 2010, 04:51:09 AM by Sean Arble »
New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies & Crystal Downs

Paul_Turner

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2008, 12:14:10 PM »
Sean

Considering the 4th a bit more....there is quite a lot of room between the apex of the triangle of the bunker and the back of the green, it's about 50 yards, so you should be able to have a crack at that green with a 3wood or driver.  The green is somewhat holding too, how bad is it behind the green, I can't recall.

I think I prefer the 6th to 7th mainly because of the green and it's nice to have flattish hole and break up the pattern of down into a valley drive followed by a steep uphill approach.  I think Colt wanted to have some holes with bump and run, low flighted options, rather than just aerial.

I like the 5th when I was there but I think that cross bunker being in that state has spoiled it somewhat.
can't get to heaven with a three chord song

Bill_McBride

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2008, 01:29:29 PM »

3.  Are the AA's initials PG? 

Yes!

Mark Bourgeois

Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2008, 01:31:53 PM »
Paul

There's a bunker back left I think. One thing they could do is clear out the left corridor a bit more.

That would make the hole more about placement of the tee shot.

Part of my affection for the hole is down to the lovely look of the green complex.  The entire complex is crowned; the light always falls so beautifully upon it.

I assume you have the Darwin article from shortly after the course opened, the one with a routing map. What comments on the 4th does it contain?

BTW, don't mean to make this about the 4th. How bout the opening run of 1-5?

The uphill first is such a challenging shot to execute right out of the box. Mishits go nowhere into that hill.

Then the bunkering shot of 2 green is quite a challenge for a second shot.

The 3rd, 4th, and 5th are interesting for the juxtaposition of tee shots called for.

The holes seem rather innocent and yet good luck with them if you hope to get a score going.

Mark

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2008, 01:58:15 PM »
Sean

Considering the 4th a bit more....there is quite a lot of room between the apex of the triangle of the bunker and the back of the green, it's about 50 yards, so you should be able to have a crack at that green with a 3wood or driver.  The green is somewhat holding too, how bad is it behind the green, I can't recall.

I think I prefer the 6th to 7th mainly because of the green and it's nice to have flattish hole and break up the pattern of down into a valley drive followed by a steep uphill approach.  I think Colt wanted to have some holes with bump and run, low flighted options, rather than just aerial.

I like the 5th when I was there but I think that cross bunker being in that state has spoiled it somewhat.

Paul

I say the carry is ~220 (from the ladies tee and 240ish from the men's) because the apex just short of the green is quite steep and balls aren't likely to get much roll especially from the downhill tee shot.  The green does rise to the middle, but it doesn't fall off the back so badly.  Its one of those holes that a guy hitting a driver 240ish is often gonna wanna have a go.  Laying up is rather a boring play because its a 5 iron/wedge and I don't think there is much advantage to being on any side of the fairway.  All in all, I think the hole is averagish, but my beef is really how the bunkering looks.  The concept seems good, but I don't think it was pull;ed off particularly well here. 

I am not really enamoured with 6 or 7.  You could be right about the introduction of a flat hole to break up the down/up pattern.  Both are decent holes, but as you say, the green for 6 is better and I like the little valley of sin just short of the green.  St Georges Hill is quite well off if 4-7 is the 2nd cousin stretch (and I do think so) because all of these holes has something about them to recommend.  Thinking about it makes me believe even moreso that the back nine is where the course really scores high points for me. 

Ciao

New plays planned for 2022: Erewash, St Pats, The Loop x2, Arcadia Bluffs South, Lawsonia Links, Shoreacres, Culver Academies & Crystal Downs

Kevin Pallier

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2008, 08:21:36 PM »
Thanks for the pics Sean

I concur with your notion of the B9 being the better of the two.

Philip Gawith

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2008, 09:14:10 AM »
The beast has surfaced....

Sean and I took pics from broadly similar pics so i am not sure i have improvements to offer, but i will check. Like Sean, I thought the course lived up to the hype. He is right to stress the sense of space the course offers, and the excellent greenkeeping with the trees and the undergrowth kept in good check - neither of us lost a ball despite a few wayward blows, and being able to find your ball certainly increases the pleasure of the round. In this respect, at least, i think the course is in better shape than any of its heathland peers - at least the ones i have seen in the recent past. I would think it probably also has more elevation change than any of the other heathland courses i can think of - possibly Sunningdale Old compares, but not as much i don't think.

I agree with Sean re SGH tending towards parkland with heathland features - I played Walton Heath a few days before and SGH certainly plays a lot less firm and fast than WH. Although the course is relatively open, it does still have a lot of tall trees - and the huge houses on the perimeter - and this combination, as well as the green set-up, do make it feel more parkland.

It was a bit frustrating to be pushed so far forward on certain tees, but then that is ofen the way with British courses - the immediate, eccentric assumption that visitors are always hackers! In the case of the 4th it certainly made it a driveable proposition - i tugged a 3 iron, but was pin high (remember, this hole is downhill). According the strokesaver, the front of the green is 227 from ladies, 248 from the mens and 257 from medal markers. I liked this hole -the shape of the bunkering/green made me think of Africa! When you are close to the green has quite a pronounced dome shape which looks intimidating. Strokesaver says the green is 28 yards long so not as much room for error as might be assumed - but there is also the landing area (narrow) in front of that which makes the shot more makeable.

One of the features of the course is the fact that a number of elevated greens make distance judgement difficult and hence it is not easy to get close to the hole - examples would include 1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13....

I did not have as strong a view as Sean about the second nine being the stronger. Put differently, I thought the first nine had a strong and varied first four holes - and i don't think there are any weak ones after that. The most straightforward was probably the (stroke one) 6th, but as Sean's photos show, that also has interest in the form pof a handsome bunker and the "valley of sin" ahead of the green.

I don't think the bunkering is as interesting as on some other heathland courses, but there were certainly a few holes with handsome bunkering complexes - such as five, eight (even in its modern diluted form, still an exceptional looking hole) and thirteen.

 

Paul_Turner

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #23 on: August 24, 2008, 10:48:29 AM »
The lay up at the 4th looks to be much more interesting if the pin is tucked to one side:  the triangle of bunkers comes into effect and even the single one on the left, for this pin position.  There pics are from about 7 years ago and I think by Jeroen Pit who doesn't post anymore :'(






nice roll in the green
can't get to heaven with a three chord song

Mark_Fine

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Re: St Georges Hill
« Reply #24 on: August 24, 2008, 03:32:21 PM »
Forrest and I profiled "That Damend Bunker" as the many of the members like to call it, as one of our 20 famous hazards.  This is the bunker on the #8 hole.  We talk a little about its evolutin and included some old photos of the bunker/greensite.  It was once quite dramatic.  A sketch is also included showing its current size and configuration.  Sorry I can't post them on the Internet (don't have permission) or I would. 

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