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Sean_A

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The Kingdom of KINGTON New
« on: August 24, 2007, 07:57:54 PM »


At just under 6000 yards, many will dismiss Kington as far too short and nothing but a bit of fun, though fun Kington certainly is, the course should not be taken lightly.  Hutchison’s fondness for North Berwick, a links famous for its variety and quirkiness, enabled him to value unusual concepts without discarding what was at the time modern design theory.  Opened in 1926, Major CK Hutchison produced a remarkably crafty course which relies greatly on gaining the correct angles of approach, for the greens often fall heavily away from the front or sides making recovery from the wrong position terribly difficult despite appearances to the contrary.  It should come as no surprise that the Major could create such a gem.  He was a well known figure in the game as an amateur (he reached the final of the 1909 British Amateur) and as a serious student of architecture through his membership of Huntercombe, an early Willie Park Jr. ground breaking design.  On a more practical level, James Braid relied heavily on Hutchison’s knowledge during the design and construction of Kings and Queens courses at Gleneagles.  Additionally, for a brief period starting in the late 20s, Hutchison was in partnership with Majors GC Campbell and SV Hotchkin.  The company, Ferigna Incorporated, was responsible for all facets of the golf course business. This “Trinity of Majors” is famously responsible for the creation of Pulborough, a course well known for its combination of beauty and fierce hazards.

Kington can fairly be described as an inland-super-mare.  The sea is miles away, yet the golf at Kington is remarkably similar to seaside golf due to the keen terrain.  There are no bunkers and the course is not overly wide with practically no shaping of the fairways. In fact, Kington is the epitome of why wide is good.  Let the golfer open the shoulders, but if he places the ball in the wrong spot he can be left with a devil of a recovery – often times from quite close to the hole.  Bradnor Hill is among the chief defences with its slopes acting for and against play.  The micro undulations can leave a player confounded on how to make solid contact with anything other than short irons, or indeed the putter. The course climbs the hill for much of the front 9 and affords arresting views of the Brecon Beacons, Malverns and Black Mountains.  The club claims that at 1284 feet Kington is the highest course in England, but that isn’t important other than to impart that wind is another of Kington’s primary defences.  The greens tend to be narrow and many are angled against fairways and/or over deep fall-aways.  While there are plenty of unknowing breaks to be had, the greens are essentially flat. Finally, Kington’s turf is as fine as one could hope to find on most highly rated links.  There is a springiness which encourages the player to be aggressive both on the fairways and greens.





An aerial tour of Kington.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfmCm-ZoK5c&app=desktop

Peter Finch video at Kington.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TouLqFtZzKI&feature=youtu.be

Standing on the first tee one immediately senses he is in for a treat.  A decent drive will make it past a shallow recess which is part of Offa's Dyke Path. This path was created out of what is thought to be an 8th century boundary between Mercia and Powys built by King Offa.  The first three holes make steady progress up Bradnor Hill.  All are good and require a deft touch rather than brute force. 


When the course is keen one can readily see why such width is required.  In the conditions depicted below, a drive down the middle of the fairway with any hint of draw will finish in the left quarry.


Below is a common approach angle for #1 and one of the reasons I think Kington is a wonderful course - this design is 100% percent about the angles of play and how to use gravity to the best effect.  The green is dramatically influenced by grade level slopes.  Because of this the putting surfaces can be surprisingly fast and turn where it seems improbable.




The reader can see the angled nature of the green from the 2nd tee.


The 2nd turns hard right around a higher part of Bradnor Hill.  This higher ground which curves around the 2nd and 3rd greens used to be part of an horse racing track.  It is very easy to hit a drive well past the turning point left or in a deep gulley right.  A good line is the old cock fighting pit which is just in view from the tee. The green moves deceptively hard from front right. 


#3 is a useful par 3 to a shelf green that is deceptively large.  The gentle start abruptly changes on the 4th; still uphill, brutish at 435 yards and usually into the prevailing breeze.  This is one of the few holes at Kington which requires a carry. The second shot doesn't get any easier. The green is set down a left to right slope with two tiers in the same direction. Suffice it to say that a par here is well earned.  One aspect of Kington which is disheartening are the scattering of trees behind some skyline greens.  In the case of the 4th it is a exception because of the lovely tree.




Kington's very own Road Hole is sublime, as are all the 3 pars at Kington.  The surface of the green is blind and the short iron needs to kick in from the left.  As is evidenced by the road..this is farm country.   




One had better know how to flight his ball and control it once it lands or Kington will eat you alive with niggling recoveries.  The 7th is an up and over reachable par 5 with a green split in two by the crest of rise.  The visual clues tell the golfer the green falls from front to back, but mysteriously the putt from the rear of the green seems to be downhill as well.  This may be because the green is near the summit of Bradnor Hill. 

#8 is a superb par 4 which can be driven from the old tees, but the club has committed a serious breach of architectural malpractice by building a new set of tees much further back and right. This addition completely ignores Hutchison's original intent.  From what is now the ladies tee, the hole is reachable, but legs left if the player chooses to try for the pitch and putt birdie.  For those going for the green, anything left all but eliminates any chance of birdie.   More than a few holes have a "gate" which is a free running access to the green for those in the correct position.  Often times this gate is off-centre which creates a dogleg effect even though the fairways tend to be very wide.  Kington is also known to have patches of gorse which cause a spot of bother here and there.




The course continues to wind its way around Bradnor Hill with blind drives, front to back sloping greens and skyline greens as particular features. #9 from the right tee - as tricky as it gets!  Hollows guard the natural kick in area to the left of the green which, like the 8th, runs away from the tee.




The 10th sports another blind drive and side by side two tier green.  #11 is a reachable par 5 with a clever front to back green fed from a downhill fairway. This hole marks the point of a general descent back toward the house.  Yet another formidable short hole, the twelfth is one of the author's favourites. 


There is a gate off-set right and golfers who can't make the carry over the mounding do attempt the running hook.  This picture, taken from the right side and forward of #12 tee, highlights how a player can use the slopes to great advantage.


Behind the green.


After another blind drive which requires one to shape the tee shot into the hill or ride the high side as long as possible, #13 is a terrific par 4 in the middle of Kington's purple patch. A view of the green well beyond the driving area.




Left side of the green.


A look at the rear of the green from #13 tee.


The 14th continues the thrilling golf with this reachable par 5.  More people than not tend to find the ferns when trying a two-shot bash at this green.  An aspect of Kington which many may notice is the often random nature of the rough lines.  It can be hard to discern one's fate when flirting with the ferns. 


The green has a false front, but once past this deception it then falls away from the player.  Brilliantly, Hutchison created a lip on the back left of the green which helps contain approaches if the player gets into position to use the feature.  Otherwise, if aiming directly at the flag and a bit strong, the ball is apt to roll 50 yards beyond the green.

The 215 yard 15th completes the set of very good short holes.




The penalty for coming up short is imaginative as this sort of humpty bumpty land features prominently at Kington. 


A side view of the hollows.


The obscured approach to #16.  This green was significantly softened some years ago.  Bitter debate still rages over whether it was a good or bad idea to level the surface.


The seventeenth is a classic example of why width is so important to creating strategy.  This is a short par 4 with a wide fairway that often plays downwind.  However, as is the theme throughout Kington, one must gain the correct angle or be left with a very difficult approach to this green which slopes toward the clubhouse down the hill.     


A closer look.  Notice there are no long grass stems as in the previous photo. The club has recently started cutting the fairways more often. Time will tell if the upgraded maintenance will eliminate the random fairway lines...let us hope not for that is one of the aspects of Kington which make it so endearing.


We finally come to what I think is the finest finishing hole in golf.  It isn't often that a significant percentage of handicap golfers can stand on the tee of a par 4 and aspire to a 3.  However, on many days this is exactly the goal on Kington's 18th.  Choose a club, take aim at the pro shop, fire away over the quarry and let the fun unfold. 


The green is an extremely narrow target.


Looking back toward the tee and the 1st fairway. 


Bernard Darwin had this to say about Kington: “Wisely, no attempt has been made toward a ‘set’ or stereotyped layout…outstanding in its variety, interest and charm.”  As with other courses such as Woking and Beau Desert, for those who give Kington due attention, a gradual appreciation and admiration will emerge.  There are no less than three All England candidates in numbers 1, 12 and 18 with the last being this author’s pick as the finest finishing hole he has experienced.  One’s handicap may be flattered if he chooses to play Kington on its terms, but without question fun will be had by one and all.  2*  2020

Should one decide to stay in Kington for a night and/or get thirsty, there is a wonderful pub on the outskirts of town.  With its charming front room ambience, the Ye Olde Tavern is aptly named.


While the town is down on its luck, there is still a lot to like about Kington.


Ciao
« Last Edit: December 31, 2021, 12:22:42 AM by Sean_A »
New plays planned for 2022:

Mark Pearce

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Re:Kington - For The Benefit of Ray Ten and Mark P
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2007, 02:26:17 AM »
Wonderful.  Thanks Sean.  I'll be making a short detour on my way home on Tuesday!
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

Mark Pearce

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Re:Kington - For The Benefit of Ray Ten and Mark P
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2007, 07:27:56 PM »
Extraordinary.  From the first fairway on to the approach to 18 it's as if my ball was following your camera, so many of those shots are exactly the shot I had on Tuesday.  Great pictures.
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

Tony_Muldoon

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Re:Kington - For The Benefit of Ray Ten and Mark P
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2007, 11:34:45 AM »
Thanks Sean, inspiring.


When you see courses like this you understand why golf  matchplay. On there it has to be matchplay.

Tony
Let's make GCA grate again!

Mark_Rowlinson

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Re:Kington - For The Benefit of Ray Ten and Mark P
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2007, 07:47:54 AM »
And for those who may be attracted to this part of the world by Sean's wonderful photos, it is one of the most unspoiled parts of the UK.  Shropshire, Herefordshire and over the border into mid-Wales is very special. There's not much golf, but Llandrindod Wells is also worth a bash and I and others have extolled the virtues of Welshpool and Llanymynech, but the non-golfing delights are so many.  Spend a night in a pub/hotel at Bishop's Castle and enjoy the products of the two micro-breweries. Don't miss Ludlow, one of the gastronomic capitals of England (at some cost!). Neither should you miss Montgomery, a beautiful little classical town that you have to 'go to' because it's not on the way to or from anywhere. Clun is an austere place, but it's quite special, as is the drive over Kerry Hill from there to Newtown. Stokesay Castle just south of Craven Arms is a must see, more a slightly fortified manor house than a castle. Make sure you drive over the Long Mynd (throwing in a round of golf at Church Stretton), but neither should you neglect the drive along Wenlock Edge to Much Wenlock with its gorgeous Priory. read your Housman and make sure to take in places such as Hughley (given a steeple by Housman, but it doesn't have one and never did!). You are then on the southern edge of the big industrial archaeology heritage area centred on Ironbridge, which is fascinating.

Don't miss Leominster when you visit Kington. It has a lovely Priory and I remember having some of the best home-made fish cakes I've ever had in a very pleasant (and inexpensive) cafe in the charming little town.

Alternatively, head nearer to Worcester and enjoy the market town of Ledbury with its first-rate organic butchers specialising in meet from classical breeds, the charming spaciousness of Bromyard, the mistletoe markets of Tenbury Wells (nearer to Xmas, of course) and the other-worldliness of Brown Clee. This is a place to get out your Pevsner and visit the little churches - some even Saxon, many Norman and very unspoilt. There are Compostella pilgrimage churches in Herefordshire. And for those who are Elgar fans, Worcester should not be missed, and enjoy the hop fields and oast houses as you go.  By the way, I got hold of a DVD copy of Ken Russell's great Elgar film recently. It's wonderful.

It really is a special part of the world.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2007, 07:50:57 AM by Mark_Rowlinson »

Sean_A

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Re: Kington - For The Benefit of Ray Ten and Mark P
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2009, 08:09:58 PM »
The Kingdom of Kington beckons.  I have updated the review annd invite all to have a look.

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022:

Phil McDade

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Re: KINGTON 1284 Revisted
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2009, 09:56:36 AM »
We finally come to what I think is the finest finishing hole in golf.  It isn't often that a significant percentage of handicap golfers can stand on the tee of a par 4 and aspire to a 3.  However, on many days this is exactly the goal on Kington's 18th.  Choose a club, take aim at the pro shop, fire away and let the fun unfold.



Sean:

Of all the pictures in all the threads, Courses by Country, and My Home Course features posted on GCA, this is my favorite.

I'm not sure how I missed this thread when you first posted it. Thanks very much for bringing it back and updating it.

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: KINGTON 1284 Revisted
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2009, 04:31:39 AM »
Phil

Kington has to be the king of gravity golf.  I can't think of a single hole where a slight misjudgement won't land the player several if not several dozen yards away from the flag or in a hollow.

I have never been keen on mountain golf, but Kington is in a way mountain golf on a large hill. However, what sets it apart from the American style mountain course is the course can be walked. Hutchison kept every climb/descent just manageable and because the course is short with short green to tee walks the effort isn't too taxing - though once finished you know you were on a good walk!

Kington is in the same boat as Painswick and Huntercombe.  Its a throwback to a lost era and should be seen by anybody interested in design history - plus its a damn fine course.

Ciao

New plays planned for 2022:

Phil McDade

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Re: KINGTON 1284 Revisted
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2009, 06:14:19 PM »
Sean:

I just love how this course LOOKS. All those greens benched on the sides of hills, the endless parade of skyline shots, the contrast between the lay-of-the-land fairways and the often elaborate mounding near and around the greens, the long views. I spent half the night last night just googling the aerial, looking at the routing and comparing it to your tour. What was fascinating was that the land, the design, and the routing make for such an interesting course that I forget halfway through that the course is bunkerless. It's not that the course "doesn't need them;" it's as if the routing and terrain might even make bunkers superflous and distracting -- the way a wonderful and sublime piece of architecture doesn't need any bells and whistles, as they would simply detract from the graceful beauty of the original.

I'm assuming there are obvious parallels to Pennard, one of your favorites. What's your take on comparing/contrasting the two, the obvious yardage differences aside?

Peter Ferlicca

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Re: KINGTON 1284 Revisted
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2009, 06:41:28 PM »
Sean, that has got to be one of the coolest looking golf courses I have seen, I remember seeing that 18th hole before, but the whole course has a awesome look to it.  It looks as if you are on top of a mountain playing to the edge on every hole.  The rumples in the fairway probably make every shot interesting.  The par 5 14th has to be the coolest par 5 I have seen, not a single bunker, dives down off the mountain

Then this shot you took from the middle of the fairway, might be the coolest photo I have ever seen.  With the rumpled fairway leading to the skyline green with a huge false front, if this picture doesn’t get your juices flowing something wrong.


Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: KINGTON 1284 Revisted
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2009, 07:02:14 PM »
Sean:

I just love how this course LOOKS. All those greens benched on the sides of hills, the endless parade of skyline shots, the contrast between the lay-of-the-land fairways and the often elaborate mounding near and around the greens, the long views. I spent half the night last night just googling the aerial, looking at the routing and comparing it to your tour. What was fascinating was that the land, the design, and the routing make for such an interesting course that I forget halfway through that the course is bunkerless. It's not that the course "doesn't need them;" it's as if the routing and terrain might even make bunkers superflous and distracting -- the way a wonderful and sublime piece of architecture doesn't need any bells and whistles, as they would simply detract from the graceful beauty of the original.

I'm assuming there are obvious parallels to Pennard, one of your favorites. What's your take on comparing/contrasting the two, the obvious yardage differences aside?

Phil

I think there are many parallels between Kington and Pennard.  

1. Wind (both being raised above the surrounding area).
2. Dominant feature of gravity golf over aerial golf.  In a way, once you get the hang of Kington it is easier than Pennard because of the earthworks around the greens.  These can often be used to bank balls off when you want to play safe or get yourself out of trouble.  The only thing to remember is that you can't get caught on the high side of the hill with thise feature between yourself and the hole.  The great thing is that on loads of the Kington holes on has to go on the high side if he wants a shot at birdie.  
3. Blind/obscured shots (to be expected from a hilly design pre heavy machinery).
4. Many uphill approaches.
5. Deceiving driving lines (often because not sure how far the ball will roll).
6. Preferred angles of approach which accentuate ground game further.
7. Greens flowing with lay of land.
8. Humpty bumpty fairways which are hard to judge for consistent ground game options.
9. Good mix of short and mid length par 4s with the odd long one tossed in.  
10. Excellent sets of 1 shotters.
11. All par 5s reachable.
12. Both are fairly hilly, but within reason.  
13 Equalish number of drives which one must choose to either ride the high side or work the ball into the slope to hold it.  
14. It sounds weird, but both have animal dung to deal with.  The stuff sometimes influences me in what type of shot to hit around the greens as that shit can make you look like you hit a dreadfully weak chip!  
15. Superb long range views.
16. Good variety of downhill, uphill, sidehill golfing.


It really is striking how similar both courses are even though they look completely different.  Obviously, and it sounds strange writing this, Kington's site is more severe especially since Hutchison preferred to mainly attack the hills obliquely (even if uphill/downhill) whereas Braid wasn't too afraid to attack straight up hills a bit more often.  Other main differences are that Pennard has a few holes which restrict play with narrowness which I think is a good thing so long as the rough isn't stupid and Kington has a fair number of front to back sloping greens.  

PF

The neat thing about #14 is that you will swear that after the false front the green runs uphill.  Well, it is quite obvious in the pix the general lay of the land is severely downhill and that is exactly what the back 2/3s of the green does - run from middle to back.  Its a very odd effect that I am not sure I have seen before - which is why its my favourite green on the course.

Ciao
« Last Edit: April 23, 2009, 04:59:34 AM by Sean Arble »
New plays planned for 2022:

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: KINGTON: New R&A Rules
« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2009, 07:58:37 AM »
As is the usual form, the 2009/10 Winter Tour kicked off with a game at Kington.  I think this is the third visit on the trot with very fine weather which most certainly breaks with form.  Anyway, I added a few pix and of course, the new rules which apply to seniors - aren't they lucky?

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022:

Dónal Ó Ceallaigh

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Re: KINGTON: New R&A Rules For Seniors
« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2009, 08:22:43 AM »
Sean, a great presenataion once again!

Since yourself and many others on this site contribute wonderful course descriptions, is it not possible to include these in the "Courses by Country" section. Perhaps, many would have to be tidied up a little, but they certainly warrant a place on the "Courses by Country" section. What is the protocol here?

I think it's a shame to have to search the discussion group to find all these wonderful course descriptions.

Dónal.

Sean_A

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: KINGTON: New R&A Rules For Seniors
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2009, 01:12:41 PM »
Sean, a great presenataion once again!

Since yourself and many others on this site contribute wonderful course descriptions, is it not possible to include these in the "Courses by Country" section. Perhaps, many would have to be tidied up a little, but they certainly warrant a place on the "Courses by Country" section. What is the protocol here?

I think it's a shame to have to search the discussion group to find all these wonderful course descriptions.

Dónal.

D

Thank you for the kind words.  To answer your question, I believe the Courses by Country section is the domain of Ran.  I don't recall anybody else contributing.  He has some work of others in the Architecture Timeline though.

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022:

Jason Topp

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: KINGTON: New R&A Rules For Seniors
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2009, 06:39:51 PM »
Sean:

How long is the drive from Pennard?

Sean_A

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Re: KINGTON: New R&A Rules For Seniors
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2009, 01:53:03 AM »
Sean:

How long is the drive from Pennard?

Jason

I reckon its about 2.5 hours from Kington to Pennard and 3ish via Porthcawl.

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022:

Mark Pearce

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: KINGTON: New R&A Rules For Seniors
« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2009, 04:01:55 AM »
I, for one, am hoping to have a visit to Kington before or after BUDA next year.  I've only played there once but it left a lasting impression on me.  A far greater impression than many more highly rated courses.
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

Mark Pearce

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Re: KINGTON: Its Not Pie In The Sky
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2011, 03:54:19 AM »
I played at Kington yesterday with my wife and three boys, on the way back from a weekend spent in Herefordshire.  Selling Lorna the idea of a round of golf was hard.  However, Kington worked its magic and they all loved it sufficiently that, over a drink and a snack in the clubhouse afterwards and at the suggestion of Cameron (my eldest, 15) we went through our cards recounting how each of us fared at each of the holes.

The boys loved it and it really drove home what a great course this is.  Some observations:

The greens were lightening fast.  Whilst I was sorting things out in the pro-shop the boys went for a practice putt.  When I found them on the practice green the first thing Cameron (a member at Elie and Northumberland and who loves the speed of the links greens at Elie) said was the the greens were "stupidly" fast.  I cannot remember playing a course in the UK with greens any quicker than Kington yesterday.  That added (rather than detracting as it sometimes can) from the pleasure of the round.

The grass bunkers and mounds around the greens really are superb hazards.  Combined with sloping, fast greens they challenge the short game far more than sand.

The turf is an excellent golfing surface.  My wife commented that it was the sort of turf Elie should have!

The use of the hill is simply brilliant.  Every hole requires thought, particularly in a stiff breeze as we had yesterday.

More than anything Kington shows what can be achiecved with imagination, a bit of a hill and an understanding of angles.  The fact that it boasts some of the finest views in British golf just seals the deal.

There was talk in the car on the way home of booking a week near Kington next year......
« Last Edit: August 30, 2011, 08:42:04 AM by Mark Pearce »
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

John Mayhugh

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Re: KINGTON: Its Not Pie In The Sky
« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2011, 08:41:48 AM »
More than anything Kington shows what can be achieved with imagination, a bit of a hill and an understanding of angles.  The fact that it boasts some of the finest views in British golf just seals the deal.

Kington is fantastic.  Great idea to take your kids out there.

How did everyone like the 18th?

Mark Pearce

  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: KINGTON: Its Not Just Pie In The Sky
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2011, 08:47:04 AM »
John,

All loved the 18th.  I played with the twins, who both drove it to the bottom of the hill and had short uphill approaches from the RHS.  Both missed short and right and then proceeded to learn an important lesson in angles!  I pushed my tee shot and pitched on the front left of the green (so I'd have been way too long had I landed it left).  It then hit the face of a mound and stayed front left.  From where I nearly putted off the green and three putted for par.  Cameron, I gather left his drive in the ferns left but still managed to rescue par.  I'm not sure the boys had really enjoyed a golf course as a course as much before, and Cameron loves Elie.
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

Anthony Gray

Re: KINGTON: Its Not Just Pie In The Sky
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2011, 09:13:31 AM »


  Awesome. I would think a 60 degree wedge would be useful for some shots. Looks like a course you could play everyday.

  Anthony


Peter Pallotta

Re: KINGTON: Its Not Just Pie In The Sky
« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2011, 10:06:44 AM »
Thanks, Sean.  I must not be getting enough sleep, because your photos and Mark R's post almost had me crying, the lovliness of it all and the longing for that topography/setting. 

Peter

Sean_A

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Re: KINGTON: Its Not Just Pie In The Sky
« Reply #22 on: August 31, 2011, 11:15:38 AM »
Canary

Kington's greens are usually among the best I play year in and and year out. 

Did you convince your kids to bang shots through the hollows rather than chip over them?

Ciao
New plays planned for 2022:

Jason Topp

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Re: KINGTON: Its Not Just Pie In The Sky
« Reply #23 on: August 31, 2011, 12:09:30 PM »
For those that have not played the course the lumps in the fairway are very small and quite different from those you find in a links fairway. It is more like pasture land than links ground.   As a result, nearly every shot from the fairway is from an awkward lie.  Balls normally wind up in the low points and the undulations make getting at the ball a bit difficult.  Also - the bounce of the ball is more random than one would normally find. 

I am not sure whether or not I would grow to like that aspect of Kington over repeat plays or would grow weary of it.

Sean - what has your reaction been over repeat plays?  Has anyone else played the course enough to have a view on the subject?
 

Mark Pearce

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Re: KINGTON: Its Not Just Pie In The Sky
« Reply #24 on: August 31, 2011, 12:20:20 PM »
Sean,

That's their natural way of playing.  Cameron's first option is to use the putter.  If that isn't available, he'll see if he can use a 7 iron.  Failing that, he'll try the pitching wedge.  The only one of us that used the 60 degree wedge was me and when I missed the 12th on the left I managed to chip in, despite not being able to see the hole.  The boys loved the mounds/hollows around the green and the number of different ways there were of playing any shot.  I think this sort of golf is so much more fun for kids of that age (the twins are 12 and Cameron's 15).
In July 2022 I will be riding 3 stages of the Tour de France,  in the Alps, to raise money for the William Wates Memorial Trust which is dedicated to providing opportunities for under privileged young adults.  To support the Trust, please visit https://fundraising.wwmt.org/fundraisers/MarkPearce/rid

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