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GolfClubAtlas.com => Golf Course Architecture => Topic started by: Sean_A on December 05, 2014, 01:55:51 PM

Title: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 05, 2014, 01:55:51 PM
Onto Seascale, a town of about 2000 people hard on the sea.  While not a town one would confuse with the Riviera, there is a pleasant seafront affording views to the Isle of Man.  Although, a word of warning is due.  Seascale is the only English town of this size I have experience with which doesn't have a pub.  The town isn't dry mind you, there are a few hotels including the rather smart Cumbrian Lodge on the top of the town at which one can wet his whistle, but no pub!!!  What is the country coming to? 

The opening view after getting out of the car is very promising.  Although, we know, having driven around the Sellafield Power Station, that this decomissioned nuclear monstrosity is lurking at the far end of the course.  In the bar I learned from one of the locals that after the war this station produced Britain's first weapons grade plutonium - 329.  Having grown up quite near the Enrico Fermi Nuclear Generating Station and its history of the 1966 meltdown, I was a bit on edge every time we faced north.   

Seascale's opening two holes are not special, but they do use OOB line very well.  Drives to the left of the fairways left the golfer to deal with corner bunkers.  The first hole is decidely better than the second. 
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4578/24930481148_0a285cc0ed_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4578/24930481148_0a285cc0ed_b.jpg)

The course dramatically wakes from its sleepy opening two holes on the third.  We play downhill and around a small field grazing a bull.  This is great use of OOB. 
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4535/24930481008_b5a816a27f_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4535/24930481008_b5a816a27f_b.jpg)

If one doesn't take on the OOB on the drive, he must to one degree or another do so on the second, although with a good angle to the green.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4545/24930481098_c626a95f76_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4545/24930481098_c626a95f76_b.jpg)

These two bunkers await the cowardly play away from the bull.  Further up, there is a hidden centre-line greenside bunker...just for good measure.     
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4578/24930480868_893c95637b_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4578/24930480868_893c95637b_b.jpg)

The fourth heads back up the hill with much of the fairway out right and blind.  Perhaps the most interesting aspect of Seascale is how it works across several levels of terrain and that is most evident on this part of the course. 
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4575/24930480718_240ae60ecc_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4575/24930480718_240ae60ecc_b.jpg)

The next three holes continue to zig zag down the hill.  The short 5th is a decent par 3. The back to back par 5s come next.  The 6th slogs uphill and finishes with a wonderfully sloping green and the 7th at 550ish yards heads back toward Sellafield.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4529/24930480618_514eef5615_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4529/24930480618_514eef5615_b.jpg)

Many of the bunkers are throwbacks to 100 years ago.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4524/24930480548_399af70336_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4524/24930480548_399af70336_b.jpg)

Playing into a low spot near the 3rd green, the 8th is a very good longish one-shotter.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4572/37916678885_00b3a606d2_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4572/37916678885_00b3a606d2_b.jpg)

The side ends with a stunning split level fairway par 4.  On the left is the high fairway, to the right is the blind, low fairway.  If taking the shorter low side one must hit a huge drive or risk being caught in rough and then being left with a blind second.  The high choice leaves the green in clear view and all the trouble lurking left and right. 
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4527/24930480398_1288002fe4_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4527/24930480398_1288002fe4_b.jpg)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4585/24930480498_c491cd99f5_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4585/24930480498_c491cd99f5_b.jpg)

Fine golf continues on the back nine with its opening hole.  This diminutive par 3 packs a punch as the green and wind feed directly toward the water.  The short grass is nearly cut to banks of the burn, something far too rarely done.  This is probably the best short hole I played on the trip.   
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4522/24930480228_9297c93d93_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4522/24930480228_9297c93d93_b.jpg)

One can probably just make out the nose of a bunker to the rear left.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4555/37916678625_7cb27320ec_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4555/37916678625_7cb27320ec_b.jpg)

A long par 4 with a nasty Road Hole type bunker protecting its left flank, the 11th is obviously not pretty, but after many short par 4s on the front nine this is a welcome and well designed bruiser.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4566/24930479968_c7ac5da3cb_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4566/24930479968_c7ac5da3cb_b.jpg)

For mine the weakest hole on the back nine, but the wee shallows shy of the 12th green offer some unexpected interest.  If one plays the "17 hole course" our last shot heading toward Sellafield is also the final par 3.  There is loads more room out left than it appears on the 13th, but the recovery from that angle isn't straight forward. 
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4566/37916678475_443879a5e4_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4566/37916678475_443879a5e4_b.jpg)

We now head back into pure duneland country for the next three holes and all are very good.  The three shot 14th offers a great opportunity for a birdie as its reachable in two.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4531/24930479748_16ba3d7cab_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4531/24930479748_16ba3d7cab_b.jpg)

Incidentally, the high ridge in the background is the thrilling scene of the 17th tee.  It is here we can choose to skip the the punchbowl 15th and avoid that view of you know what.  Remarkably, this tee playing toward the 16th and 15th greens is the same at ~300 yards.   However, Punch Bowl is a fine hole and should not be missed.  Besides, skipping this hole would rob the golfer of playing the proper 16th, an immensely long par 4 covering superb linksland.  It is easy to see why we initially thought the 15th headed toward the clubhouse. 
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4517/37916678405_00f35a0ac5_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4517/37916678405_00f35a0ac5_b.jpg)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4534/24930479608_71c9246c13_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4534/24930479608_71c9246c13_b.jpg)

It is rare to get two truly outstanding holes on a links so little known such as Seascale, but with the ninth and sixteenth that is exactly what this course provides.  #16 is a monumental hole played on the lowest level in the valley.  There is a large dune on the left which climbs well above the sea and the railroad embankment on the right. At 470ish yards and requiring a very precise second, this hole must measure up as one of the most fearsome par 4s in England.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4526/24930479368_f92faafae4_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4526/24930479368_f92faafae4_b.jpg)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4544/37916677995_74db146b9b_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4544/37916677995_74db146b9b_b.jpg)

The centre-line bunker just above a fallaway is the cherry on the cake.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4548/37916678315_7578f4711e_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4548/37916678315_7578f4711e_b.jpg)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4541/37916678235_3a56e025e6_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4541/37916678235_3a56e025e6_b.jpg)

The railway line cuts off the play near the beach, but in attacking the ridge obliquely, #17 brings the disaster of lost ball near what would have been beach squarely into play.  After the heroic drive the approach is rather tame.  Home is an excellent finisher over a roller coaster fairway.  The road is most certainly in play on both the drive and approach.  Most people wisely choose to park the car in the lower lot - tee hee.  One really wants to hit to the plateau beyond this bunker rather than going too far and being left with a blind or obscured approach.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4558/24930479148_bb3da86f36_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4558/24930479148_bb3da86f36_b.jpg)

The flag location is incredibly deceptive as it looks forward, but is in fact at the rear of the long green.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4516/37916678085_c1f313edd6_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4516/37916678085_c1f313edd6_b.jpg)

The green is a long table top affair which generally slopes to the rear.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4577/24930479218_af7456392a_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4577/24930479218_af7456392a_b.jpg)

Behind the green.
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4560/24930478768_abf65a69f0_b.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4560/24930478768_abf65a69f0_b.jpg)

Well, thats Cumbria in a nutshell.  I can honestly say that if one had to choose a course which stole the show, it was Seascale.  Everybody enjoyed the course and thought it more player friendly than Silloth.  You can read that to mean it is an easier course.  Silloth is the better course of the two, but Seascale has a charm which is hard to deny.  I would also add that for my money, Seascale had the best two par 4s and the best par 3 of either course.  The downside is the relatively sedate contouring of the greens and of course, Sellafield.  However, lets not let that take away from what is a magnificent days golf which can be had at bargain prices.  People should be beating down the door to play Seascale at 37.50 including the run of the menu for lunch on a weekend.  That said, I am hesitant to recommend Seascale because most people are looking for more of a championship/better manicured test when they travel.  For these reasons I suggest that if folks find themselves in Cumbria then Seascale is well worth the effort if the drive isn't too far.  2011

Silloth on Solway
http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,48672.0.html (http://www.golfclubatlas.com/forum/index.php/topic,48672.0.html)

Ciao   
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Peter Pallotta on December 05, 2014, 02:21:55 PM
Thank you, Sean. This time, however, besides offering my only compliments I also want to make a request:

Please add to your already excellent profiles some pre/post-round nuances and details. For example, it is interesting to note that Seascale has no pub, and I would've been even more interested to read about your views of the club-house lunch, or your experience at the Cumbrian Lodge. (As you know, I dream of one day having a proper English tour, with stops at places like Canterbury or Seascale at the weekend, where I'd play a quick 9 before lunch at a local establishment; there I'd order Dover Sole, Lamb Cutlets, a Pint of Cider, and some Stilton cheese, and finish with tea taken with scones, clotted cream and raspberry jam.) Please add such culinerary details if/when you are so inclined. I think it would round off your tours quite nicely.

Peter

Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Clyde Johnson on December 05, 2014, 02:43:14 PM
Sean,

Have you ever been to Appleby, I think you would like it a lot?

(It wouldn't be too far behind Seascale as my second favorite course in the county!)
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Paul Gray on December 05, 2014, 05:40:16 PM
Sean,

As ever, sincere thanks for yet another exceptional tour.

PS: Unlike Peter, I have no need for the Bill Bryson like review.  ;D
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 05, 2014, 06:48:34 PM
Sorry all.  In trying to frame the pix properly I somehow created an entirely new thread.  Why the hell Ran can't sort this photo posting business is beyond me, but its a pain in the ass  >:(  Ran - are you listening? 

Pietro

To be honest, I rarely come across food in a GB&I club or restaurant while on tour that is memorable.  I know guys like Chappers and Sheehy drool over the nursery food, but for me its just okay...does the job if inelegantly.  If you want to play golf, play golf and treat the food as secondary.  If you want to eat, treat golf as secondary.  The two don't often mix very well if you seek quality and interest on both ends.

BTW - I don't recall what I ate in the clubhouse or at the Cambrian Lodge, but I do recall the evening meal was better than expected. 

BTW II - It may sound strange, but the best and most consistently high quality food I had on a golfing tour was in Aberdeen.  The average was fairly high at about 50 a night, but that isn't overboard for quality food in the UK.  Its come a long way, but has a ways to go  :o

Ciao
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: John Chilver-Stainer on December 05, 2014, 07:13:24 PM
Great tour Sean.

One other quality one should emphasize about Seascale is the predominance of Fescue fairways and greens.

In 2013 I went up the Cumbrian coast visiting Seascale, Maryport and Siloth. Among other qualities of the courses I was interested to note the fescue content of these links courses.

Both Seacale and Maryport had dry firm fescue fairways and greens.

 Although Siloth had the more interesting terrain I was disappointed to find overwatered and very "green" greens compromising the fescue content.

My conclusion was that Siloth was a victim of it's own success as a championship venue, with the belief that high maintenenace would lead to better greens.

Seascale and Mayport on the other hand possibly do not have the means for high maintenance and have as a result retained their traditonal fine fescue greens - hopefully for a long time to come.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 06, 2014, 03:24:44 AM
John

That is interesting because the rough at Silloth was bloody awful, yet it was far more playable at Seascale. 

Seascale was a very pleasant surprise,  but I am not sure the GCA faithful can look past the power station. 

Ciao 
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Jon Wiggett on December 06, 2014, 03:36:52 AM

Seascale was a very pleasant surprise,  but I am not sure the GCA faithful can look past the power station. 

Ciao 

Sean,

That's because too many even on here are more enamoured with the panorama rather than the substance of the course.

Jon
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 06, 2014, 03:46:37 AM
Jon

Generally speaking I think you are right.  Golfers seem to instinctively want heavy dunes to play through and lovely scenery.  Its hard to blame them though.  I only weened myself off the dune sickness maybe 7 years ago after playing Hillside.  I started to really think about what dunes offer and what they take away from golf.  Its no surprise I should think TOC and Deal have the best terrain there is for golf; all the interesting lies, bumps and rolls without mountain climbing nor being constricted by dune "dune walls".  While Seascale doesn't offer the terrain of TOC or Deal, the routing does cope with the hills in a rather original fashion...very similar to Porthcawl in this way.

Sheehy

There is a bit of difference between a caravan site and this hulking power station  ;)

Ciao
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Ally Mcintosh on December 06, 2014, 04:11:25 AM
Sean, you shouldn't be so black and white about big dunes. I've stated on here before that I'm generally more of a low lying links type person but if there's one thing I've learned since starting to study dune formation in 2008, it is that whilst there is a consistent structure in a system's formation, each system manifests itself in a completely different way with regards to the suitability for golf. That may sound obvious but I've seen "big dune" golf where the main ridges are about 50 yards apart with fairly level dune slacks in between (giving the kind of golf you talk about) and I've seen systems with 80 yards between the ridges filled with mini-ridges and undulations. Plenty of width and interest. In the end, it comes down to whether the dunes can be used in an interesting way to supplement the valley style golf. And even if not, some of those valleys have as much interest as links without big dunes. What is the ultimate crime is the flattering of the undulations in those valleys. That results in what you talk about. Like Hillside I believe?

Back to Seascale. I really like the look of it. It's a real shame it's just out of striking distance for a day trip in the middle of a Silloth stay, otherwise I'd have my group booked in already.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 06, 2014, 04:29:47 AM
Ally

Its often not the dune system, but the design or maintenance practices which create the restricted golf.  I am struggling to think of a single course playing through large dunes which I would call wide.  There must be one or two, but not many.  It doesn't much matter how wide the gaps are if the rough isn't properly controlled...practically everywhere is narrowing fairways.  At Lahinch there is the Klondyke which is very narrow, but rough is well managed to retain many errant shots.  It could  be that so many balls end up on the slope (right side especially) that grass has a hard time growing  ;D In general though, clubs are failing miserably to offer that accommodation.  Hillside is a different story.  Fairways blast through dunes, there aren't natural gaps for some of them.  Its not pretty.   

Seascale [i]is[/i] within easy striking distance of Silloth if staying in Silloth.  Its maybe 50 minutes away.  In summer, its easy to play both in the same day.  For a guy interested in seeing different courses, its a no brainer to stop by Seascale if in Silloth. 

Ciao
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Ally Mcintosh on December 06, 2014, 04:49:11 AM
50 minutes might be just doable. Google Earth had it as 75 I think. And 2.5 hours driving on a middle day of three for my 16 is far outside their expectations. I'd certainly make the effort either way.

Regards big dune golf, you are right that it is rare that you find 18 holes where there aren't at least 2 or 3 that are routed through constricting areas in the system. Which is ok in my book as long as the others offer more width and variety.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Jonathan Davison on December 06, 2014, 05:59:32 AM
Sean,
I am sure some of the rough at Silloth is protected by English Heritage and the club are restricted what they can cut.
Probably this is not the case at Seascale.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Adrian_Stiff on December 06, 2014, 06:03:45 AM
Seascale looks really nice apart the 'one thing' which perhaps pulls it back 3 Doak Points.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Mark_Rowlinson on December 06, 2014, 06:13:14 AM
Thank you Sean. Seascale is a long-time favourite.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Jon Wiggett on December 06, 2014, 12:30:13 PM
Sean,

at Hillside I quite like 1 to 11 and 17, 18 but 12 through 16 are just dire. Despite the large dunes they are simply poorly designed to point of becoming uninspiring. I do believe it would be possible to improve massively on these holes even in their current routing and at little expense (exception being the dire 15th) which would make a huge difference to the course.

Golf seems to be one of the few sports where the look of things outside the plying area is often more important to the players than the playing area itself.

Jon
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Mark Pearce on December 06, 2014, 01:23:10 PM
I must get over to Seascale next summer.  As to the power station, I love the background at Seaton Carew, so I imagine I'll like it.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: jeffwarne on December 06, 2014, 03:28:36 PM
Sean,
great pictures.
I had a 2012 trip to Seascale planned to coincide with Buda 2012 but missed the entire trip ::) ::).
Your pictures are very appealing.
The only picture that was unappealing to me was the one of the last par 3.
As you know I'm usually a sucker for scenrey, but not really big dunes.
Ironically it was your fave Enniscrone that opened my eyes years ago to the greatness that be achieved without the dunes as the dunes holes are not my faves there.
I am a big fan of variety and Seascale seems to have that in spades

perhaps being there live the power station is more ominous.
the terrain looks fantastic.
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 07, 2014, 08:14:17 AM
Sean,

Have you ever been to Appleby, I think you would like it a lot?

(It wouldn't be too far behind Seascale as my second favorite course in the county!)

Clyde

Yes, I have played Appleby...some serious wind there.   Its not a bad course at all and works fairly well as a stop off heading north/south on the M6.  I do recall there was one brilliant hole, a par 3 on the back nine.  The green was narrow with steep banks on either side and a strip bunker blocking the bounce in...very odd looking hole...but excellent.  There were a few other really goo short holes as well.  I can't recall exactly where the course was, but it was in open country...lovely.

Jeff

You would like Seascale. 

Ciao
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Tony_Muldoon on December 07, 2014, 10:31:52 AM

perhaps being there live the power station is more ominous.
the terrain looks fantastic.


A lot of people seem to be obsessing about this.  In my one play I did notice it but more as a "never seen that from a glof course" moment.
When I look back it's not strongly embedded in my memory, but several holes are particularly  9, 16 and 18.

The course is recomended by me and the drive from Siloth is not unatractive.

Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Neil White on December 08, 2014, 01:54:58 PM

perhaps being there live the power station is more ominous.
the terrain looks fantastic.


A lot of people seem to be obsessing about this.  In my one play I did notice it but more as a "never seen that from a glof course" moment.
When I look back it's not strongly embedded in my memory, but several holes are particularly  9, 16 and 18.

The course is recomended by me and the drive from Siloth is not unatractive.


I'm with you Tony on this one.

When I played Seascale the fairly flat field nature of the out and back 11th and 12th was more jarring than the view of Sellafield.

I felt the 9th was the standout hole for dramatic effect - the 10th is a lovely hole - 15th and 16th are great holes making good use of the natural undulations and the 18th green is a stunner sloping away from the line of play.

I really must get back up there.

Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 08, 2014, 07:06:31 PM
Neil

My favourite hole is #3; superb use of OOB.  Truth be told, I think Seascale hits higher notes than Silloth, but it lacks in consistency. 

Ciao
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Niall C on December 09, 2014, 09:35:36 AM
Sean,
I am sure some of the rough at Silloth is protected by English Heritage and the club are restricted what they can cut.
Probably this is not the case at Seascale.

Jonathan

As a former member I'm not aware of any restrictions at Silloth in terms of the play areas ie fairways and rough. I know that about 10 to 15 years ago English Nature (?) gave them a sizeable grant to strip out a lot of the gorse and replant with marram with a view to improving the habitat for the wildlife. When you think about what remodelling they have done with certain holes in the last 20 years eg. 5th, 11th and 18th, then you have to think any restrictions are fairly minimal.

John C-S

I know what you mean with regards to the greens. The club also seems to be fighting drainage problems on some fairways which have become more apparent in recent years. The water table seems to be getting the blame although I fancy that similar to problems that Glasgow Gailes had on some holes, the real issue might compaction. Having said that, I'm no greenkeeper.

Niall
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Michael H on December 09, 2014, 04:23:27 PM
Is this not the perfect bunker?

(http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff114/seanrobertarble/SEASCALE%20GC/060.jpg?t=1308727687)

Thanks, Sean.

Bogey
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Brent Hutto on December 09, 2014, 04:28:15 PM
Is this not the perfect bunker?

(http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff114/seanrobertarble/SEASCALE%20GC/060.jpg?t=1308727687)

Thanks, Sean.

Bogey

Bunker? All I see is some little scraped-up spot where a sheep must have killed the grass or something.

Now here's a *proper* bunker with some good, clean sand in.

(https://www.thegranddelmar.com/assets/Uploads/600X400Gallerygolf23.jpg)
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: John Morrissett on December 10, 2014, 02:09:53 PM
Sean -

Thanks for the great tour that brings back happy memories of my round at Seascale in 2003.  Based on Donald Steel's book, I decided to play there and was quite glad I did.  In fact just last week I told Ran that I was surprised that Seascale (along with Stonehaven in Scotland) was not featured in the Confidential Guide to me.  The fact that none of the four authors had been there shows the depth of courses in GB&I.

John
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 16, 2014, 04:15:48 AM
Sean -

Thanks for the great tour that brings back happy memories of my round at Seascale in 2003.  Based on Donald Steel's book, I decided to play there and was quite glad I did.  In fact just last week I told Ran that I was surprised that Seascale (along with Stonehaven in Scotland) was not featured in the Confidential Guide to me.  The fact that none of the four authors had been there shows the depth of courses in GB&I.

John

John

It didn't occur to me that Seascale wasn't included in the CF.  With Doak mellowing on the little guys, perhaps there should be a place for Seascale.

Ciao
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Sean_A on December 06, 2017, 05:59:49 AM
Tucky's link to this tour on the Holes Playing to Corners...thread had me take another look at Seascale.  I see Doak didn't visit for his CG update, that is a harsh omission. I wonder too if I haven't been too hard on Seascale after looking at the pix.  It falls well short of my top 100 best GB&I courses, but now I am thinking....maybe it is time for another visit.

Ciao
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Niall C on December 06, 2017, 07:32:09 AM
Sean


I'd be more than happy to join you. As I've confessed before I'm embarrassed to say I never played it when I lived down there.


Niall
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Thomas Dai on December 06, 2017, 01:43:37 PM
Looks like there's some interesting stuff at Seascale. A nice looking sandy dune area not far to the south at Ravenglass as well.....shame no course there though.
By UK standards a long way off the usual beaten track through - https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@54.4045418,-3.4904788,1743m/data=!3m1!1e3
atb
Title: Re: A CUMBRIAN COUPLET: SEASCALE GC
Post by: Mark Pearce on December 07, 2017, 09:06:28 AM
Sean, I'd also be interested in a trip to Seascale.  I missed it when the pre-BUDA crowd went there.